water capacity of pipes

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by leaping leon, May 1, 2005.

  1. leaping leon

    leaping leon Well-Known Member

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    Over a year ago I saw a chart (found it by accident) giving the water capacity of differnt sizes of pvc pipe for instance "x" size of pvc holds "y" amount of water in "z" length. I can't find it now, although I've used several different word combinations on searching online. Anyone know how I can find this? If not online, a book or a chart from a pipe supplier would be great, too.

    I know I could figure this out, using my math-gifted teenager, but she's got a job now. I would like a "cheat sheet" showing the capacity of several different sizes of pipe, ranging from 1" up to 6".

    I'm in the early phases of designing a water system that will rely upon a solar pump, and am thinking of using pvc pipe as part of the water storage system; also need to know the filled weight of different sizes of pvc (I can figure that out once I have the capacity numbers.)

    Thank you for any info you can provide.
     
  2. mtman

    mtman Well-Known Member

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    if i remember right a 6 inch well casing holds about 1.6 gallons a foot so i guess 3 inch would be half of that and so on iff i remember like i said
     

  3. mtman

    mtman Well-Known Member

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    im sry its 1.5 gallons per foot of 6 inch
     
  4. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    Pounds of water = pipe length in feet X pipe diameter in inches2 (squared) X 0.34, from the Ace Hardware Referance Book.
     
  5. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Too cold & tired here to give the right formuila, but cutting diameter in 1/2 does _not_ cut volume in 1/2, that is totally wrong!!!! You need to involve pi. It's not a linear equation.

    --->Paul
     
  6. mtman

    mtman Well-Known Member

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    o it seemed like it would work
     
  7. WanderingOak

    WanderingOak Well-Known Member

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    The volume of a cylinder is pi (3.1416) x radius squared x height. For a pipe that would be pi x (1/2 diameter) squared x length of pipe (in inches). That will give you the volume in cubic inches. There are 231 cubic inches in a gallon, so if you divide by 231, it will give you the number of gallons that the pipe will hold. If you are mathematically challenged, here is a website that will automagicly calculate the volume in square inches: http://www.mathepower.com/english/zylinder.php . Just enter the pipe diameter in the base field, and the pipe length in the altitude field.