Was a good day today in the bee yards, except for the mud.

Discussion in 'Beekeeping' started by alleyyooper, Jan 5, 2007.

  1. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper keeper of the bees Staff Member Supporter

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    We did a check today, was over 50F . We still have all our colonies alive including the 6 single deeps I'm experminting with. I also have 5 nucs that are a part of the expermint , still alive. We will be adding pollen patties in Febuary and doing spilts in May. I am planing on raiseing most of our own queens from our long term non treated bees.
    Still going to get about 10 Minnesota Hygenic queens and 10 more of the New World Carnies.

    :D Al
     
  2. Timber

    Timber Well-Known Member

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    Hi Al, We having a warm winter here, in the 50's.
    I've got some singles hives that are down to.. if we ever get a hard freeze I don't think they'll make it.
    What concerns me, it very warm couple weeks ago I've saw yellow jackets fly in and out. About mid Oct was the last time I've open the hives, small colony good storage of pollen and honey. But thinking the yellow jackets were robbing. How much, don't know. Last Thursday did see bees normal and active.

    I have them wrap but thinking of dropping in some patties. Seeing warming temperatures wondering if this will help.

    BTW mud, yeah....playing in it now. Wish it's good for something :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

    Timber
     

  3. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper keeper of the bees Staff Member Supporter

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    At this time of year is better to use feeders with as thick of syrup as you can make. Or better yet a candy board.The candy boards lay on top of the top bars where the girls can get it if and when they reach the top bars and are out of honey. If you start feeding syrup you have to keep it up.
    Even though the queens will start laying soon, if they havn't all ready, you don't want to give them pollen patties for a quick spring build up to soon. We place the pollen patties in the last week of Febuary. In a normal spring the weather breaks so we can start feeding 1:1 syrup in mid March. We have colonies more than ready to split in the first or second week of May.
    :rolleyes: This warm weather has messed up my expermint some.

    :D Al
     
  4. BasicLiving

    BasicLiving Well-Known Member

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    In the 70's here today! Absolutely gorgeous. Our new bees are really happy today. We didn't open hives, but walked up to each of them and our little Russians came up to greet us. They buzzed about so happily! I'm really getting attached to these little gals. They are about 1/4 mile from our house, but I went out to our picnic table and found one dead in a citrona candle the lid had blown off. Not sure what happened - the candle hasn't been lit in months. I almost cried.

    Starting tomorrow, it's supposed to be colder, but still warm for January - in the 40s during the day.
     
  5. Mutti

    Mutti Well-Known Member Supporter

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    how do you make your pollen patties? We have in years past but don't remember the formula. Also, are you trying to develope your own line of mite-resistant bees? Never heard of these type queens. We so enjoy your informative posts--and your great pics! DEE
     
  6. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper keeper of the bees Staff Member Supporter

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    The Recipe...
    To make about 306 pounds of pollen patties
    ( About 306 - One lb. patties) requires:
    three buckets of 67% sugar syrup,
    ***we use honey**
    one bucket of white granulated table sugar and
    two buckets of soy flour
    two buckets of yeast
    1/3 of a bucket of pollen
    Mix in a cement mixer.

    The above has to be weighed so you can divide the amount you want to mix. the one below is easier. We add honey B healthy to the mix.

    Mix 5 lb pollen substitute with 1/2 gal (*Soy flour). 2:1 syrup (sugar: water), (*We use honey) pour out about 1/2 inch thick and let stand overnight. Cut and feed. This is fine to freeze if it makes too large a batch to be used right away.

    When mixing, add the pollen substitute gradually if you don't want to lose most of it when you start to stir since it's so powdery. Plan on a great upper body workout when you work to get it all moistened. I put mine out on sheets of waxed paper, covered with another sheet and patted it to about the right thickness. Left all on the kitchen cabinet overnight, then cut it with a large knife and put into freezer bags paper and all since the paper keeps the pieces from drying out completely.

    We now press the patties on freezer paper with a 20 ton press and a homemade form I made with a 2"x12"x4' plank. They don't seem to chew up the freezer paper as fast so the patties stay together better.

    :) Yes I am trying to make queens from bees we saved from different places where they had no treatments for at least 3 years. I place the nucs with the queen cells in our yards with New World Carnolian's for the drones.
    I am still ordering a number of the New World Carnolian queens. Not sure if we are going to order any SMR Carnolian queens as we have in the past.

    :) Kare has taken 95% of the bee pictures in the last 2 years. I'll tell her you enjoy them.

    :D Al
     
  7. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper keeper of the bees Staff Member Supporter

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    I forgot Tim Has a method he uses on his web site.
    http://www.honeyrunapiaries.com/16.231.0.0.1.0.phtml

    We only place the patty on one sheet, then place them on the top bars pollen patty down. We found no need to use two sheets or seal them. Any extra I place in a sealed 2 gallon pail, free at a local bakery.

    :D Al
     
  8. Mutti

    Mutti Well-Known Member Supporter

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    why do you use the Carnolian queens? more productive? or are you trying to raise mite resistance? what about the hygenic? never heard of this type. We've always had Italians or Buckfast but very interested in using minimal medications and do live in an area with no other beekeepers(or havers) for miles. Thanks, Dee
     
  9. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper keeper of the bees Staff Member Supporter

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    We are useing mostly the SMR & NW Carnolian queens because we find them just as productive as our Itialians and much more mite resistance. I believe they are more hygenic being the reason.
    The Minnesota hygenic line has some very good reviews so I would like to try them and possiably let our queens mate with those drones.
    The US buckfast line of bees is over 20 some years old from B Weaver in Texas. I have read many reports of the new queens from there producing hot hives. I would buy Buckfast queens from Monro Honey in Canada, their line is from breeding stock they get from Denmark each year.

    You may be surprized where there other bee keepers in your area. We just discovered there are 2 colonies just a few doors down from My inlaws in town.

    :D Al