Warts in puppy's mouth?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Ravenlost, Jan 4, 2005.

  1. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My Border Collie mix, Bonnie, is six-months-old. She has what I can only describe as "warts" growing on her gums...a few on the outside of her mouth and DOZENS of them on the inside of her mouth...especially along the back of her mouth (crease of the lips). They don't seem to bother her at all...just look like fleshy pale bumps. Is this something we should be concerned about? Our other pup (a Border Collie/Blue Heeler mix) had a few of these when she was Bonnie's age, but they're gone now.

    What is this? Will Bonnie's also go away on their own? She's going to the vet next week to be spayed and I plan to ask him about them. Her inner lips in the back are just covered. YUCK. :(
     
  2. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    I don't know, but possibly some virus? Could be something like papilloma, and maybe they could be permanent, or it could be temporary. I am guessing that A vet would need to see this and do some pathology on a sample to know for certain.
     

  3. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thanks moonwolf. I looked up papilloma online and from the photos and descriptions I found that's exactly what it is. Since she has so many I will definitely talk to the vet about it when she goes in next week. At least I don't have to worry that she'll spread it to us, the cats or the older dogs.
     
  4. Oregon Too

    Oregon Too Active Member

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    Have them checked. Don't want to scare you, but here is what just happened to me. My GSPs are always coming up with bumps, until last week nothing big. We just remove them, and always they've been fatty cells. GSPs are somewhat prone to them and skin tags as they age.

    Noticed one that I didn't like (otherwise, my girl was feisty as ever) - first vet thought it was nothing. Second vet aspirated it, removed it, and its a mast cell tumor. Thankfully, grade 1, and wide margins removed so surgery hopefully has gotten all of it. Mast cell tumors are just plain evil - there is no guide for appearance, can vary. Grade 1=survivable (surgery usually removes all, and is all that is needed), Grade 2=maybe, Grade 3=not at all hopeful. They can show up anywhere on the dog. Until last week, I had NO idea. All dogs have mast cells - if there is an inflammation or wound, they release histamines to repair and heal. But when these cells go out of whack and turn cancerous, look out. This thing was probably the size of a pencil eraser, and had been there a month. Just pink looking, average -like a skin tag on steriods I guess.

    From here on out, no bump on my dogs will go without a vet check. Bumps that are mast cell tumors sure don't give you any meaningful warning of just how bad the prognosis could be, if not caught early. Yours do sound like warts, so probably no big deal. But this one we had was nothing bad looking, no pain, no nothing. And its a killer. I did read that they can form in the mouth as well, which is why I wanted to give you a head's up for a check of them, just to make sure they are only the no-big-deal kind of bumps that dogs get. Good luck - hope you can post back on what the vet finds out.
     
  5. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'm glad you caught it in time Oregon Too! I'm pretty sure after what I read that this is the papilloma virus. It's common in dogs under age two and is passed from one dog to another. Tippy had a few when she was younger and I'm sure she passed the virus to Bonnie. Tippy's warts are all gone now. I'm just concerned because Bonnie has so many of them (although it doesn't seem to bother her...she's lying down at the food bowl chomping away right now. I have never seen this pup eat standing up!).
     
  6. GoldenMom

    GoldenMom Well-Known Member

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    I think you're probably on the right track with the papilloma virus. I imagine that with in a few weeks she should be all healed up. It would be extremely unlikely for for something bad like a mast cell tumor to develop in a six month old puppy. I would still definitely have your vet check them. Hope she heals quickly from her spay-I'm sure she will. The hardest part will be keeping her quiet for the several days following the surgery.
     
  7. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Tell me about it GoldenMom! It is so hard trying to keep a Border Collie calm and restful...and in the house! Luckily Bonnie is a big lazy girl...not like her high-strung sister Tippy.
     
  8. Oregon Too

    Oregon Too Active Member

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    Thanks, glad its gone too. From what I've read, roughly 85% of these type tumors are in dogs 6-8 or older, and the remaining 15% are in dogs under 3 years of age, with Boxers and Boston terriers leading the list of breed predisposed to mcts.

    My other gsp (her brother) had a wart under his ear, which is coming off Friday when he is in for a teeth cleaning (he's had it for years, never changes, no vet's been bothered by it, but right now I am in the mood to eliminate all bumps).

    Warts are also a problem with young horses - I wonder why in the young ones way more than in the older horses? I have seen a band of yearlings, where one gets some on his muzzle and/or ears, and danged if many of the rest don't show up with the same. They seem to end up going away on their own, at least from what I've seen.
     
  9. Critter183

    Critter183 Well-Known Member

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    Has she been kissing toads again? Naughty dog! :)
     
  10. GoldenMom

    GoldenMom Well-Known Member

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    It's because wart in young critters are usually viral. Don't ask me how the first one came up with it (probably survived in the soil or something from a previously infected animal), but that one passes it on to the rest. Once the virus is cleared from their systems they're generally immune. That's why you don't typically see contagious warts in older animals.
     
  11. Oregon Too

    Oregon Too Active Member

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    Thanks for the explanation, Goldenmom. I'd always noticed it because there is nothing uglier (well, of course there is, but you know...) than a pretty group of babies with an outbreak of warts all over their little heads!