Want to breed PIGS???

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by barnyardfun, Mar 26, 2005.

  1. barnyardfun

    barnyardfun Happy Homemaker Supporter

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    Hello, I am new here and I wanted to ask a question........

    I am thinking of raising some pigs, breeding, and sending a few off to butcher. I have never raised pigs before so I need some help. Here is my questions....

    Is there a breed that is better for begginers??
    How many should I start with?
    What age should I get them at??

    One thing I am really concerned about is that most people I talk to tells me I don't want to breed pigs and trust me I have heard some horror stories.....like mama pigs eating her babies (I really don't want to see that!), piglets always excaping, etc.

    I also heard that you do not want to butcher a boar because it's meat won't be any good and you don't want a sow because if she is in heat when butcher her meat won't be any good!! HELP!! What do I want to get then???

    Can someone please give me some ideas on this subject. I really do want to try to do some breeding, to me it seems it would be more profitable.

    Thanks for any help you can provide.
     
  2. RedneckWoman

    RedneckWoman Well-Known Member

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    As for breed I would say it would really depend on what you want the most of. Pork chops, bacon, etc. I have three different breeds right now and the temperment and everything is pretty much the same (my experience someone else may have had different experiences with various breeds). At times my Yorks do seem to be a little rowdier than the Hamps and PCs though.
    There is really no point in keeping a boar unless you have a few sows. Some one might want to correct me here but imo I would say about five sows to justify keeping one boar?
    If you want to breed right away I would suggest six month olds. They can breed at five or six months but I know of some people that like to wait a little longer. If you want to work with them a lot so that they are really tame like pets I would suggest six weeks.
    There are those that have had terrible experiences but they really aren't a common everyday occurance. Good fencing/housing is a must for any pig because they all will escape if given the opportunity.
    The boar meat thing is an age old argument that will never end lol. Personally I have butchered my own intact boars and never had smelly or bad tasting meat but there are others that swear it stinks, tastes bad, etc. So, if you are breeding you can castrate your male pigs to be for butchering. I have never heard of the bad sow meat thing and never butchered a sow so I can't comment there.
    As far as profit goes pigs are known as "mortgage lifters" for a reason so there is money to be made in pigs.
     

  3. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    This is a personal decision. I started with a boar and a sow and have always enjoyed breeding and being involved with the piglets from birth. I actually enjoy pigs- I don't just raise them for food. I've heard others say that there is no sense in keeping a boar for a couple of sows but when one lives in the middle of nowhere and faces other obstacles to breeding, I think keeping a boar is good sense. After they are grown they dont eat that much anyway, in my experience with wild pigs. Mine ate a cup of grain per day and all the grass I raked in there. Very worthwhile for me.
     
  4. BDB

    BDB BDB

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    I agree with you red not worth keeping a boar unless you had a bunch a sows we have no grass up here in northeast in winter like FLA so it cost more to keep em for the thirty dollars it cost for the semen and suplies to AI em its worth it as long as you dont have mean or rowdy pigs
    as for the moma pigs if you get a bad one put her in the freezer and start over for there pens for years i used pallets nailed together you can usually get them for free after your done with um just burn em up
    the breed is up to you like red was sayin look around and see what fits your needs good luck
     
  5. barnyardfun

    barnyardfun Happy Homemaker Supporter

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    :) Thank you for the advice! Anyone has anything else keep it coming!!

    We went to the sell barn last night and bought us three little piggys. Unfortunatly I have no clue what breed they are! :eek: They are white and that is about all I know! Two of them were gilts and the other was a little boar but unfortunatly he looks like he was cut right before he came to the sell!! Oh well. I am going to fatten him up to eat and try to find the other two a mate! :)

    Thanks again for all the information! You guys are the only reason why I am going to go ahead and try to breed pigs. I think I will really like it but EVERYONE around here seems to think it is a horrible idea!! But I am my own person so I am going to give this a try. Thanks again for all the help.
     
  6. BDB

    BDB BDB

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    people always tell me im crazy to but if you enjoy what your doin dont worry what they say good luck with your piggys
     
  7. Mike in Pa

    Mike in Pa Well-Known Member

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    It won't be profitable I don't think ... best is you'd break even. Hope you don't mind learning to cut 'n rip. When you have little ones you'll have to learn how if you want to sell the males as feeders.
    I had this idea very recently but decided not to. I even had an uncut male. When I made the decision not to I had to cut him myself ... not fun but I'd think you'd get used to it.
     
  8. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    Just an input. If you get small pigs at this time, you timing may be off when the sow farrows in relation to the weather. The task for having good surviving litters becomes more difficult if cold weather arrives the same time as the pigs. If you were to buy a couple of market gilts you would be right on target with the timing. You will want to count the teats on the gilts and breed the ones with no less than 12. The gilts should be mature prior to breeding and not on their first few heat cycles. It is imperative that the sow be mature enough to have lots of milk.
     
  9. Matt NY

    Matt NY Well-Known Member

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    Thirty dollars? Where?
     
  10. BDB

    BDB BDB

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    I purchase semen from international boar semen i just AI one gilt it was like ten dollars a dose i used two doses it was under ten dollars for the tubes and lube the thing that cost me the most is shiping to my area
    shiping is like fifty dollars but its still worth it to me than feeding a boar year round
     
  11. bethlaf

    bethlaf Homegrown Family

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    everyone has different preferences, on wether or not to keep a boar, personally, i will keep a boar, thanks to another member on this board i know how to do ai ,
    so i can if i so choose , but i think its more important to try and keep your farm an independant system whenever possible, so thats the main reason i keep a boar same reason why i have a buck goat, my own buck rabbits and roosters ...

    we have right now a york sow and a york/hamp barrow,
    we are getting two old spots and some tamworths
    we are working on bigger pastures for the pigs, so we are going more towards the older breeds , but keeping some of the york genetics because of thier fast growth and large size
    incidentally , our sow is due to farrow, and about half her piglets are presold