Homesteading Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm getting started on a renovation of a small 80 year old house in Tennessee. When I removed the various interior layers of the walls, I found there was no exterior sheathing - just boards installed like clapboards, and I could see daylight thru the cracks. Found some hornets and such but not as many as I would have expected.

I'm looking for options to make this close to right. Probably will end up with vertical board and batten style vinyl siding. I'm thinking a rain barrier over the clapboards, then strapping that I can shim if needed to straighten things out if needed and then the vinyl siding. I'd really rather not remove the clapboards and put up sheathing, that would cause the house to be open to the weather more than I want. All new windows and doors so wall thickness is not really an issue.

I guess I could install sheathing over the clapboards??

Any suggestions?

Thanks, Bob
 

·
Be powerful. No other option exists.
Joined
·
41,609 Posts
Do not use vinyl. It doesn’t hold up to hail, and it isn’t fire resistant.

Do you mean plywood sheathing? Or a manufactured product?

I alway recommend a fiber cement exterior for fire protection.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
418 Posts
I would rip it off add sheathing and install windows with house wrap ?
Nothing tricky at all .
Buy the time you try to fix the walls get the windows in and get it water proof
then you get to fool with all the window and door jams .
I would just do one wall at a time easy peeze you won’t be sorry .
How long could it take ?
Pull off the siding and add the sheathing one side a day 4 days worth of work and it al good
no fooling around .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,986 Posts
I'm getting started on a renovation of a small 80 year old house in Tennessee. When I removed the various interior layers of the walls, I found there was no exterior sheathing - just boards installed like clapboards, and I could see daylight thru the cracks. Found some hornets and such but not as many as I would have expected.

I'm looking for options to make this close to right. Probably will end up with vertical board and batten style vinyl siding. I'm thinking a rain barrier over the clapboards, then strapping that I can shim if needed to straighten things out if needed and then the vinyl siding. I'd really rather not remove the clapboards and put up sheathing, that would cause the house to be open to the weather more than I want. All new windows and doors so wall thickness is not really an issue.

I guess I could install sheathing over the clapboards??

Any suggestions?

Thanks, Bob
Need pictures really bad. This may be structural siding. Yes, there is such a thing. It may be balloon frame. It may be that you need to take it off as mentioned and install something else.

Box and plank house= no studs at all. It consists of horizontal boards on the interior nailed to vertical boards on the exterior. This makes a very strong 1 1/2" thick wall ( or more the older it is) that will withstand tornados. Think modern day SIP construction but with no insulation.

Balloon frame=(at least the "country" way) building the floor frame, then studding it up off of the floor beams instead of the subfloor. ( I feel this is what you actually have but need pics) They build many of these in timber country in the USA right after WWII because of shortage of money and, well, everything else. You can pull the siding off and redo but you will need to fill that void between the floor and the wall with some kind of fireproof insulation. (Did I mention I used to be a HERS rater?) Otherwise, you will have a fire hazard. The wall cavities act like a chimney in a brush/wildland fire and will go between your walls without this fire block. The hornets may be getting in this way from the bottom.

Either way, you can install over it but check these conditions out and go the extra mile.

Vertical is the best way every time. If a tree dies in the woods but doesn't fall down it will not rot much for years or even decades. Once it falls horizontal it will rot in years. Trees (and wood) is not designed by nature to run horizontal. It is designed to run vertical. How many board and batt houses have you seen that were over a hundred years old with no new siding? How many horizontal siding houses have you ever seen the siding that lasted 100 years? I have seen none and believe me, I have actively looked for them.

Best of luck to you.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top