walking onions

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by bugstabber, May 15, 2005.

  1. bugstabber

    bugstabber Chief cook & weed puller Supporter

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    I need a little information on how to grow walking onions. I read the old threads, but I still have questions. I just bought two quart bags at a yard sale yesterday. I plant them, they develop tops. Do they grow tops all summer or just one shot? Then, do I plant a few random bulbs in the fall to grow for next years crop? Thanks for the help.
     
  2. Windy in Kansas

    Windy in Kansas In Remembrance

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    You plant the bulbs you have purchased. The onions come up in the standard fashion with green tops, think of chives only larger.

    You can havest some of these as green onions if you wish, eating the bulb and some of the green top.

    When the growing plants start to mature they will start setting bulbettes (sets) at the top of the green stalks. It is the bulbettes falling to the ground that supplies next years crop, IF left alone. Hence they move over or walk as the bulbettes fall to a new location a few inches from the old parent plant.

    The bulbettes can be harvested and planted elsewhere, such as the ones you bought.

    Speaking of green onions, I sure could use a bread and butter and green onion sandwich about now. Mmmmm!
     

  3. suelandress

    suelandress Windy Island Acres Supporter

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    Unless you are really good about picking all the bulbettes, you don't have to worry about replanting. Those things are prolific!!!
     
  4. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    Those things that form on top of walking onion stalks are called bulbils, not bulbettes!

    Two quarts of bulbils is almost commercial quantity. If they are Egyptians, they will multiply 15X. Catawissas are at least 30X. Heritage Sweet would easily be 100X. Those numbers are the quantity of bulbs and bulbils you'd have to plant the following year. If the Catawissa and Heritage Sweet bulbs are left in the ground, they'll divide and produce large clusters of plants within several years. Here, they are at their peak right now for large scallions and quite popular at farmers markets.

    Martin
     
  5. Bruce in NE

    Bruce in NE Well-Known Member

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    The variety I have, I don't even bother using anymore because the taste is, to say the least, unremarkable -- both greens and bulbs..
     
  6. suelandress

    suelandress Windy Island Acres Supporter

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    LOL And here I thought adding "ette" to the end of a word made it small :p
     
  7. bugstabber

    bugstabber Chief cook & weed puller Supporter

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    Thanks for all the help! Buying that second bag was an afterthought. I'm planning on taking them to work and sharing.
     
  8. bigeasyjock

    bigeasyjock New Member

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    I will note also that if usin' as a cooking onion use 'em young as year + old bulbs at woody.
    Mike