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Can some one tell me about "the walking onion".?
I'm in mid Indiana and have a small plant that came from a bulblet this summer. Will it over winter outside? Should I bring it inside?
Any other info would be useful.
Thank you.
 

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I just picked all the bulblets off my mature plants the other day and will plant them as soon as this darn rain stops. I'm in the Northeast z4 and they winter over for me with no protection.
Mickey
 

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Bonnie, you only have one? Poor thing will get lonely all by itself! Don't you think that you could use a few more? I've probably got 2,000 of the Catawissa bulbils. Easily that many or more from a smaller multiplier pearl onion. In all, 6 different varieties of walking onions here. All are quite winter-hardy. In fact, I'll be digging up the Catawissa area in a week or so and start over planting just the largest bulbs. No idea yet as to what I'm going to do with all of the bulbils but I'll think of something!

Martin
 

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Martin, I caught you. Is an Egyptian onion the same as a walking one? Same family? How can I tell what I have? I was given a few "E" starts years ago; they flourish or nearly perish depending on whether I give them space or bother to move new plants.

katy
 

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Katy, Egyptian onions indeed are walkers. Generally, the true Egyptians have just one cluster of topset bulbils. Catawissas are a slightly larger strain of the Egyptians and will send up at least two tiers of bulbils, sometimes even three. The "Cats" also seem to grow twice as fast as the Egyptians.

There's also a white version which produces more plants per bulb or bulbil. Those started from bulbs may make 7 or 8 separate plants and each will have its own set of bulbils and split off into separate bulbs. When started from bulbils, as many as 4 or 5 may sprout from a single set.

They are all the same family, Allium cepa, (Aggregatum Group).

Martin
 

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Hey Martin I would love a couple of your extra bulblets. When we moved I left my walking onions and I miss them-kathy h
 

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Kathy H, I'll be more than happy to oblige. E-mail me with an address and I'll rush some Catawissas off to you. That also applies to anyone else who may want some. I've got more than I can ever use and still haven't cleaned out the bed where there's a few hundred more. There's still plenty of time to plant them, even in zones 4 & 5 although the window is becoming narrower.

Martin
 

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I have some Egyptian Onions that I traded a daylily start with John from Wisconsin years ago. I am starting a small garden that has just stuff from my forum friends in it. Never got a chance to ask john about the daylily before he died :waa:
 

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I have no idea what kind I have. My BIL gave me several onions, not the tops, and I planted them. They do walk! I planted them in a raised bed but they pop up every where. They are best used in the Spring and Fall. They die back in the winter and again in the hot summer months here but right now I have foot high new onions out there. Its nice to have green onions early and late. I let the ones I plant mature for winter use. They are strong tasting onions though. A little goes a long way!
 

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Bonnie & Kathy, your packages are in the mail! Bonnie can start looking for them about Wednesday and probably Thursday for Kathy.

Corky, you've got a "walker" but didn't mention if it's a topsetter. There aren't too many true bulb multipliers other than shallots and potato onions. An exception is the i-itoi onion which is strictly for scallions, multiplies like crazy, and does go dormant in hot weather.

Martin
 

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Martin, my walker,( around here they are called winter onions) does both. It multiplies from the bulb and has topsets that fall over and root. These onions grow quite tall. The bulb is white and very strong tasting. My DH loves to eat them. I use them in cooking. I think they are a little tough just to eat.
These scallions are not big or dark brown like I have seen at festivals where a vender is selling them.
 

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Corky, don't you think that those white ones need some red Catawissa neighbors for variety?

Actually, there are not very many tall white multipliers. Most were simply given the name of the farm or area where they were "discovered" and may all be the same. I have at least 3, and possibly 4, different white ones. (I still need one more season to determine if two are simply regional variances or very close relatives.) Another is a large one and grows as tall as a normal Egyptian, two feet or more. However, it is sweet and will send up 8 or 9 shoots from a single bulb and 4 or 5 from just a topset bulbil. I hope to have a lot of them to share next year as all are in the ground and growing right now.

Martin
 

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These suckers grow up to three feet tall before they topset. And NO!!!!!! :eek: thank you anyway, I don't need any more walking onions. Nice try! :haha:
 
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