Wahoo?

Discussion in 'Plant and Tree Identification' started by zealot, Jul 30, 2006.

  1. zealot

    zealot Soli Deo Gloria

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    Recently I found Wahoo in a tree/plant ID article in the state Conservation Dept. magazine. It looks like a tree we have here, but the pictures mostly showed the flowers and fruits, and the trees here are not in flower or fruit.
    I did notice that the leaves on the tree here, although having little or no scent on the tree, are aromatic when cut. Does this fit the description of the wahoo tree?
     
  2. tillandsia

    tillandsia Well-Known Member

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    Did the article give a scientific name? I googled "wahoo tree" and several different species popped up in the results.
     

  3. mistletoad

    mistletoad Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Wahoo is Euonymus americanus - the leaves on ours are noticable only by their scarcity. We basically have twigs and then in winter you see the beautiful berries. I have never seen one larger than a bush - how big is your tree?
     
  4. Wildcrofthollow

    Wildcrofthollow Well-Known Member

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    Euonymus americanus, wahoo or, here, burning bush. Is indeed a bush. It can be quite large tho and I suspect that some folks would be willing to call it a tree. Beautiful red in the fall (hence the burning bush thing). It is native here in VA, I think. I have only rarely seen it in the wild and then was not sure if it had not been planted as part of an old homestead.
     
  5. caballoviejo

    caballoviejo Well-Known Member

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    Its a common understory species here in MS. The roots are bright orange and the stems of the plant are green all the way to the ground. Strawberry bush a common name for E. ameriana also.

    I've never noticed a smell to the leaves but then I wasn't checking for it either.
     
  6. zealot

    zealot Soli Deo Gloria

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    I looked up wahoo in the dictionary and it listed three species.. I'll have to look back for the scientific name. Rather confusing.
     
  7. tweety

    tweety Tweety

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    I found 2 "Wahoo" in my Field Guide to Trees of Eastern US.
    One was a Burningbush and the other was an Elm, Ulmus alata, also called Cork Elm or Winged Elm.
    The elm is a more southern tree, S. Virginia to Central Missouri and points south.
    The Burningbush is more northern, N. Arkansas across to northern NC and north to the Great Lakes. They are not likely to grow in the same area. The one in this book is called Eunonymus atropurpureus (meaning dark purple) I have one in my yard, I like the look of the berries, they have 4-lobed purple capsules that split open to reveal an orange seed inside. The birds like them and plant the seeds all around, so I am always pulling little Wahoo trees out of the flower beds. It is considered a small (20 ft) riverine forest tree and likes moist low areas. Incidently it is not the same thing as the Burningbush that is sold as an ornamental shrub which may be the E. americanus refered to in the other posts.
    "Wahoo" is a Native Indian name, and obviously was attached to several different plants in different areas.
     
  8. zealot

    zealot Soli Deo Gloria

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    This is NOT an elm! We have lots of elms and I know what they look like.