:waa: Pouring out fresh milk

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by Haggis, Apr 29, 2005.

  1. Haggis

    Haggis MacCurmudgeon

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    The kids have all of the milk they can use, the two calves only use 1 1/2 gallons a day, we let the little Milking Devon heifer dry off, and still we are pouring out milk. Our 2 Jerseys being milked are giving us around 11 gallons a day and Dorsey hasn't yet maxed out on her production.

    The Jersey/Milking Devon bull calf is taking a gallon a day, and the premature pure blood Milking Devon bull calf is only taking 1/2 gallon a day. I can't believe the little guy is still kicking. Daughter had been feeding him 6 times a day, then down to 4 times a day, and now 3 times a day. Day before yesterday she had mild stroke; or so her doctor said. She is speaking with a slur and one side of her face is all wierd; it seems the calf may be coming home. I had hoped that she would get him down to being feed twice a day before he came home, but if she's going to have a heart attack on me, I suppose he could come home sooner.

    Yesterday morning we poured off the morning feeding for the calf at home and then poured the rest out to the chickens. Today we did the same thing, and most likely will again tomorrow.

    It doesn't really bother me to give milk to the chickens, but when I think of how many gentlefolk out there could really use some milk for their kids; then it kills me.
     
  2. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    Ask around, ministers, social workers, ect; they may know of someone local that could use the extra. Or add some homemade ice cream to your diet, maybe learn to make cheese, or yogurt, ect.
     

  3. farmmaid

    farmmaid Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Buy another calf...Joan
     
  4. darbyfamily

    darbyfamily Well-Known Member

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    mozzerella cheese is really easy to make, one gallon doesnt make much cheese though, so I long for the days when we have "too much" milk...I save the whey after the cheese is made and give that to the chickens...they love it! and the kids love the fresh cheese!!! YUMMMMY
     
  5. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

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    Get a pig....




    Jeff
     
  6. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    You beat me to it Jeff :) The excess milk can be poured into 40 gal. drums where it will keep for several months if needs be. It turns to curds and the pigs love it as do the chooks.

    Seriously though Haggis, if what you were saying on another post about milking up to 8 cows over the year, you are going to have to find an outlet for the milk albeit rearing calves, feeding pigs or distributing it around the neighbours - or a combination of all. I feed 8 sows, 2 boars, the cows own calves, the odd lamb and an extra 2 - 3 calves over the year plus what is taken for the house. When my cows are at the height of their lactation I can have 1,000lts of milk in drums after everything has been fed so it gives some indication of how much milk you will be looking at.

    Cheers,
    Ronnie
     
  7. Haggis

    Haggis MacCurmudgeon

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    It is in my plans to have 6 to 8 milking cows. My Grand-Darlings are still small and don't drink a lot; yet. My children are still learning to make use of an unlimited amount of milk for something other than drinking; they're being creative, but have a way to go. It just happens that at this time the milk production is ahead of my long term plans for using it.

    I know that most families of four can use the milk of one cow; if they exploit the milk to the fullest. I have 5 children who in turn have spouses, and a total of ten (coming on eleven) children of their own.

    One of my children asked my the other day just how much milk and how many eggs did I think a family could consume, and I responded with, "What do you know of custard pie with a meringue topping or quiche?"

    Hopefully we will be able to find someone within driving distance who has day old Holstein bull calves for sale on a regular basis. It would be nice to raise some beef for the children and their families. It sure would help with the extra milk.

    There is a fellow down in Illinois who has Old Spotted Hogs at $250 each weaned, and is supposed to have 6 gilts, and a young boar for sale in June. With luck, once one has bought into the breed, one would only need to import a young pure blood boar from time to time. It will grieve my heart to pay so much, but these hogs are said to thrive on grass, hay, skimmed milk, and whey. There is no grain here other than what is imported from the South.

    In the meantime, the chickens, peafowl, and even geese drink what we pour out.
     
  8. Mel-

    Mel- Well-Known Member

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    haggis,

    so sorry to hear about your daughter! is she going to be ok? my fathers cousin had a stroke that only effected one side of her face but she was years older than your daughter! I am assuming since I think you've mentioned you're only in your 50s or 60s.

    wishing her the best luck.
     
  9. Haggis

    Haggis MacCurmudgeon

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    Thanks for your concern, I really appreciate it.

    She is our 5th child and born in 1977. The poor thing suffered for years with cancer and had another go this last winter. I think they got it all, but that's what they said last time. On top of that she has super high blood pressure and all but refuses to take the medicine. The Doctor said that's what caused the stroke. She was over for a little while today, and is still having a lot of trouble speaking. Her smile is messed up a bit too. She kind of smiles on one side and is stoic on the other.

    While I was typing this she called to tell me about the little bull calf, Jack. She said he moves up to twice a day feedings startng tomorrow, but that's her style. When she was pregnant with my Grand-Darling Angus the Doctor told her that she had to get an abortion or die. She said she had rather die than kill her baby to save her own life. She's tough as nails, but she's had to be.
     
  10. SilverVista

    SilverVista Well-Known Member

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    Bless you, and your daughter, you're all fighters! Not to question the dr's, but is there any chance this is Bell's Palsey? It mimics stroke, but usually limited to the face. In fact, by coincidence, there was a thread on it -- I think in Country Families -- last week or so. It seems to be stress-related, and your daughter sounds as though stress may be something she's just sort of learned to live with.

    Do you eat pork, and have a place for a few pigs? There's nothing like milk-fed pork, and the conversion ratio of feed to marketable meet is one of the most efficient among livestock. Kids in this area who raise project pigs always have a waiting list of customers.

    Best wishes to you,
    Susan
     
  11. Haggis

    Haggis MacCurmudgeon

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    The Doc did a CAT Scan and an MRI on my daughter and found areas with dead brain cells. He seems certain it was a stroke.

    It's been a hard week on some of my daughters, our first daughter (oldest child)called with the great news that there would be another member born to the MacEanruig clan, and with the bad news that her ovaries and uterus are covered with small tumors. Now, our fourth daughter (fifth child) has had a stroke.

    We are looking for some pigs but have found nothing; nothing other than the fellow in Illinois mentioned above. I would guess that each of my children and their families could eat 2 top hogs a year without much problem.
     
  12. mamabear

    mamabear Well-Known Member

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    Haggis,
    I wish you were closer. My sons can go through milk about as fast as those hogs folks are suggesting. Cheese production sounds pretty good. I'd be willing to get some from you if you do.
    Have a great evening.
    mamabear
     
  13. Ken in Minn

    Ken in Minn Well-Known Member

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    Hello Haggis
    Sorry to hear of so much illness in your family. Hope all works out well for you and yours.
    As far as the excess milk. Sell it out as pet food. what the neighbors and friends do when they get it home, is out of your control. Lots of people doing that these days. Wish I could find some one around here who had excess milk. I would get it for my -------- pets.

    Hope all turns out well.

    Ken in Minn
     
  14. jerzeygurl

    jerzeygurl woolgathering

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    I read in a homesteading cook book about canning milk but i cant get my little ole mind arround how it wont curdle, but i guess factories do it all the time. A simple Quesso blanco vinegar cheese is easy and versatile can be use like meat cause it wont melt. i use it as bread crumbs and like tofu or meat in stir fry. or its great on sandwhiches. One thing though its much better from whole milk.