VW TDI's possibly discontinued in US

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by halfpint, Mar 27, 2006.

  1. halfpint

    halfpint Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My husband just took his Jetta TDI in for replacement of the Timing belt and was joking with one of the clerks that he probably needed to get another TDI as our son drives it most of the time. The clerk told him that VW is discontinuing the TDI in the US for next year (2007 models) and they don't know when they will resume production, so if he wanted one to get it now.

    So if any of you are planning to get a VW TDI you might want to get it now. I checked some web sites and apparently this news appears to be getting out and many are expecting the cost of used TDI's to go up.
    Dawn
     
  2. wilderness1989

    wilderness1989 Well-Known Member

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    Our old 2000 gas VW Golf is chuggin' along fine, 42 mpg on the highway. But thanks for the information.
    :cowboy:
     

  3. fantasymaker

    fantasymaker Well-Known Member

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    yep had the same problem with my 81 chevette
     
  4. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Got to drive 40 - 120 miles to get to foriegn-branded dealers. May I ask what a TDI is, never heard of it? Anything make it special? 'Jetta' I've seen a few, but do the initials do one anything special?

    --->Paul
     
  5. flannelberry

    flannelberry Pure mischief

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    TDI - is the VW turbo diesel engine
     
  6. idahodave

    idahodave Well-Known Member

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  7. cfabe

    cfabe Well-Known Member

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    Blame the EPA for making the diesel emissions requirements stricter in 2007.
     
  8. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Ok, the diesel.

    Emissions & efficiency are on a real tug of war in the USA. The emissions people are winning almost all the time, but I'm not sure that the decreased efficiency is worth the cost these days.

    --->Paul
     
  9. ozarkcat

    ozarkcat Well-Known Member

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    That's the thing that cracks me up, because it's one of the smaller diesel engines on the market - I think it's a 1.8 or 1.9, and gets an obnoxiously high gas mileage - I want to say 45-55 mpg in the Jetta wagon I was looking at earlier this year. I'd really love to see one in a larger VW as an electric hybrid, just to see what it could do, y'know?
     
  10. HermitJohn

    HermitJohn Well-Known Member

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    Goofy people running the zoo. Any car that can get real world average 50mpg or better shouldnt be subjected to emmissions requirements. Think about it logically. A car that gets say 25mpg but lower percentages of some chosen emmissions (there are many not tested for) is still pumping out a much higher total VOLUME of exhaust so higher total amount of emmissions.

    Our present crazy emmissions standards were based on % so big cars which we were making a lot of in early 70s could continue. If we had set caps on total amounts of emmissions per mile on a particular vehicle, those would have been history immediately (light trucks didnt come under emmissions standards as early as cars) as would SUVs today. Now stupid '70s era laws that tried to protect the domestic automotive industry in transition have become a holy grail for the greenies without realizing that support of such laws perpetuates big gas hog vehicles to continue to be used as personal passenger vehicles.
     
  11. fantasymaker

    fantasymaker Well-Known Member

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    It galled me to no end that I couldnt get a diesel jeep in this country after the 80s. the dealers would bald face lie that they didnt make them anymore cause they cost to much and people didnt want them all the while Id be seeing them down at the docks going overseas! in fact the last new jeep cherokee I rode in was a diesel
     
  12. diamondtim

    diamondtim Well-Known Member

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    fantasy69maker,

    The Jeep Liberty comes in a diesel. I know because I test drove one about 3 months ago.

    Diamondtim
     
  13. WanderingOak

    WanderingOak Well-Known Member

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    The TDI can not be sold new in many 'green' states (NY and CA being two that I know of), because they won't pass local emissions standards.

    From what I understand, our emissions standards are not as stringent as those within Europe. Aren't we still using 'dirty' (hi-sulphur) diesel fuel in this country? Supposedly, the diesel fuel that we use now will destroy catelytic converters, which are standard on most European diesels. I have heard tell that one we switch over to a cleaner diesel fuel and catalytic converters, the emissions for diesel vehicles will drop through the floor. Then again, as munged up as our fuel distribution system is (as KatRita showed us), I am not suprised that we haven't switched over yet.
     
  14. daytrader

    daytrader Well-Known Member

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    Our VW Gold Has the TDI. Talk about a great vehical. 62 mpg adverage on its 130k engine. Still getting great milage. Not bad for 9800 bucks brand new.

    The emisions on this car are great. It passes every year in Mo.

    I know there are new regs for Commercial Diesals and for diesal fuel, but havn't seen buch for car and pick up truck engines.

    I almost feel its because they get to good of milage and cut into the gas companies pockets.

    Our VW has the service done at the local dealer in Fairview Hights.

    They can not keep diesals on the lot. They are back ordered on them.

    The sales rep told me that they are differant clients then gas engine folks.

    He was telling me he dosn't have to try and sell them a car. They come to buy oneand know what they want.
     
  15. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    There is always a trade off.

    Producing low-sulfur diesel takes a _lot_ more equipment & refining at the plant, and you get this pile of sulfur to deal with.... It costs money & reduces efficiency of the whole process. Basically, the fuel now costs a lot more.

    Old engines used the sulfur for lubricating the injector pump. Going from over 100 ppm to under 15ppm is going to kill a lot of old diesel engines. Either a spendy lube will need to be added to the fuel, or bio-diesel added at 5%, or we stack up a lot of dead engines that woulda had a lot of effiecent life left in them. Any of those options is going to cost money - lots of it.

    So, it's not so easy as snapping one's fingers & say we should have ultra low sulfur & everything will be fine.

    There is a lot of overhead cost, new technology cost, fuel formulations cost, and retrofitting costs that will show up as inflation in our fuel supply system.

    Well, already has, as you pointed out, but maybe didn't realize. :)

    --->Paul
     
  16. idahodave

    idahodave Well-Known Member

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    Low sulfer fuel mandated in 2007...grab your wallet and kiss it goodbye

    Diesels won't make US standards by using only low sulfer fuel, but it gives the manufactures a chance to tweek the emissions controls so they can.
     
  17. daytrader

    daytrader Well-Known Member

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    Dielas fuel emissions have already dropped to the floor.

    Notice the next time you are running around a truck.

    I remember the days of black smoke and vary bad fumes. Now, the diesals run cleaner then the gas engines.

    We are still the only continent that uses gasoline as the primary fuel. Go figure.

    Heck, we import processed gasoline and export diesal fuel.

    I feel many Americans are not aware of the properties of diesal and the factors that improve the enigine life and such.

    I purchased a box truck last month with 125k on it. The guy selling it to me cut himself WAY short. By many thousands.

    I got a 20 foot deisal box truck for 700 bucks. It needed 1 new battery and a tire with a oil change.

    To buy this truck any were else would have cost 7k easy!

    He kept stressing the 125k. How it was do a sell because of the high milage!

    I tryied explaing to him that 125k is just broke in. He didn't want to hear it. he also changed the oil every 3k. I told him it only needed oil changes every 15-15k.

    His loss my gain. He bought a gasoiline driven 16 foot box truck.
     
  18. kmaproperties

    kmaproperties Well-Known Member

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    bought my diesel truck in 99 when fuel was 40 cents cheaper than regular. now I pay 30-80 cents more than regular, lost my advantage on fuel milage.
    still get 5-8 miles/gal more than gas burners, but the price dif wipes out most of it
     
  19. halfpint

    halfpint Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We run about 38-45 mpg in our Jetta (don't do a lot of long distance highway driving, but have gotten over 50mpg when we did), and around 18-22 in our minivan. So diesel would have to cost more than 2x gasoline for it to be more expensive for us.

    With a diesel truck, if you are towing with it you might have a greater advantage since your mpg won't drop as much with a diesel as with a gasoline engine. I know several people with gas suburbans or trucks, and when they tow their trailers their mileage goes down significantly. We have a 350 diesel that we tow our trailer with and our towing mpg usually only goes down by 2-3 mpg - we usually get 16-18, and towing we get about 14-15mpg.
    Daytrader, I had to laugh at your purchase. We bought a Ford Escort Diesel once for $1800 - because it was a diesel (book value on the gas at that time was over $6k). It only had 30k miles on it and was in excellent shape. The head cracked at 45K but Ford replaced it for free and we ran it to almost 90K miles when it drowned in a flood. Insurance paid us $2500 for it and we had not done anything to it besides new tires, fuel and routine maintenance.
    Dawn
     
  20. daytrader

    daytrader Well-Known Member

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    The low sulfer fuel is ALREADY inplace. The engines to burn in 2007 ARE NOT. This is no differant then in 2002 and 2004 when the new engines had to comply.

    Cat JUST made it under the button. They paid MILLIONS in fines YET were still able to sell the engines that did not meet the min requirments.

    Notice at the next deisal pump you are at. "NOTICE LOW SULFER FUEL, ITS AGAINST FEDERAL MADATE TO BURN THIS FUEL 500PPM SULFER IN 2007 OR NEWER ENGINES".

    So like in years past. There will be a run on 2006 and earlier modles.

    YOU CAN STILL BUY a brand new 2005 or even a 2006 BEFORE emisions engine.