Vogelzang or Drolet wood stove

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by gccrook, Oct 9, 2006.

  1. gccrook

    gccrook Well-Known Member

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    Anyone have any experience with these wood stoves sold by Northern Tools?
     
  2. seedspreader

    seedspreader AFKA ZealYouthGuy

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    If you go to the alt.energy board (look a little farther down) you will find a post about folks who have built using the Northern tool kits.
     

  3. neolady

    neolady Well-Known Member

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    What model Drolet? I am on my second (and last) one. I am not happy with either one of them.
     
  4. Tater'sPa

    Tater'sPa Well-Known Member

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    I've used several different lower priced models for hunting cabins or work shops and they do fine but if I were thinking of something for the home I would go to higher end stoves.
    The kit stoves sure go through the wood but they do make a great mail box!
    [​IMG]
     
  5. veme

    veme Well-Known Member Supporter

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    How about a Hitzer?
    They are made in the USA - not in China and are UL Listed.
    We went this past week-end to look at coal & wood stoves. Hitzer seems to be VERY well made.
    Real no nonsense.
    They are made by the Amish, and the dealer we saw was Amish and sells to mostly Amish.
    http://www.hitzer.com/

    veme
     
  6. gccrook

    gccrook Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, guys. After looking a little closer at their specs, I realize the Vogelzang are not what we want, and the Drolet don't seem to be as good either. I am also looking at the Englander brand locally, and they look pretty good so far. Have looked at all the expensive ones (Lopi, Avalon, Buck), but they are just to expensive for our budget.
     
  7. kmaproperties

    kmaproperties Well-Known Member

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    have a friend who put in a vogel 2500 add on furnace, it heats his 2000 sq. ft. house in northern ohio, not sure how much wood he goes through though.
     
  8. ginnie5

    ginnie5 wife,mom,taxi driver,cook Supporter

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    we have a vogelzang....bought it last year. we're heating about 1050 sq feet with it. I wish we could afford something better....it will not bank all night. It does heat nicely but we go thru what I think is too much wood....escpecially since we're not up north. I have about 3 cords of wood ready for this year. 1 1/2 dry and 1 1/2 green.


    edited to add this is the only stove we found that we could actually put in the fireplace and run the pipe up the chimney........with 8 of us and this small house there leterally is no other place to put the stove. I have plans though that when we finish the addition of tearing out this fireplace and putting in a stove that is freestanding.
     
  9. veme

    veme Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Oh no!! I just put the price list in the burn barrel!!!
    This heater was $710
    http://www.hitzer.com/model82.html
    His price was about $40 higher than Lehman's. We thought that it was okay because he has 6 kids :) & has to work of his farm during the week as a carpenter.

    Lehman's probably has the best price (they are high on everything else!!) that I know of.

    veme
     
  10. shaycool

    shaycool Well-Known Member

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    I bought this one last year for abut $1400
    http://www.hitzer.com/model30-95.html

    I burn about 40lbs of coal per day average and the house stays at 70 degrees.
    The only complaint I have is that the optional blower is loud

    Sorry for the thread drift
     
  11. Alex

    Alex Well-Known Member

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    We got the highest efficiency wood stove we could. You will burn less wood and it will last longer.

    We have 1060 ft2 total. Our outdoor temperatures can be forty-below for two or three weeks, and winter is 7 months.

    Our Blaze King is an 82.5% catalytic wood stove, with dual air distribution fans (which we rarely use – mainly for start up.) Our room temperature is thermostatically controlled [a bimetallic adjustable knob controls the inlet air for up to 47 hours (on warmer days/nights) of continuous burn time using one wood load.

    I like the big diameter wood it can take -- less splitting -- it burns great.

    Speaking of start up, literally start up is once a year. Depending on wood quality, clean the ash into the ash drawer only every two or three months.

    [​IMG]
    We protected our floor from sparks with 16 x 16 cermanic tile. We have clearance reduction panels sides and back, only 6" to corner.

    We bought it three years -- well worht the cost.

    Enjoy your wood stove,

    Alex
     
  12. APPway

    APPway Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Alex
    looks alot like our Osburn
    Love it and don't take much to keep house warm even here in SK
     
  13. gccrook

    gccrook Well-Known Member

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    I have to admit that I find all this wood stove thing a little confusing. I have looked at stoves from $800 to $2100, and I have inspected them as closely as I can, and I cannot find the difference between an $800 stove and a $2100 stove. They are made of similar steel (1/4 inch), they have very similar secondary burn chambers, they are similar in size, they have similar features. Personally, I cannot afford $2100 for a stove, and my wood is free and abundant, so I am having a hard time understanding the $2100 for a stove.
     
  14. FoxfireWoman

    FoxfireWoman Questing for Simplicity

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    We have two Vogelzang stoves. Purchased them both on a hot August day last year for around 400 a piece. One is installed in the house (1500 sq ft), the other is stored in the shed. We have no problem with the stove - it replaced the old Heartword that was almost twenty years old. We firgured that by buying two (at such a great price) we wouldn't have to buy another one in our lifetime. :)

    We looked at a number of higher priced wood heaters and really couldn't see that much difference considering the extra $$$ they wanted for them.

    JMHO
    Kat
     
  15. cowboy joe

    cowboy joe Hired Hand

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    I bought my Vogelzang in Sept at the local Tractor Supply. It was far less expensive than Northern Tools & I didn't have to pay shipping.
     
  16. gccrook

    gccrook Well-Known Member

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    I noticed that TSC and Orchelns here are dealers for US stoves, so I will look at those this week.
     
  17. ginnie5

    ginnie5 wife,mom,taxi driver,cook Supporter

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    tractor supply is where we got ours...like I said my only problem is I can't bank it to last all night.
     
  18. Alex

    Alex Well-Known Member

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    From the sales information, to answer your question, about what are some differences;

    With less emissions there are less deposits on chimney (still need clean it, but much less.)

    We also have a seemingly unlimited supply of wood, pine, spruce, birch, and we do not burn poplar. If we cut, sometimes split, stack, dry, haul, and feed 17.9% less wood through the remaining winters, it's a good thing.

    These are all subtle differences, and any stove will of course work fine.

    Alex
     
  19. gccrook

    gccrook Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Alex. I am wondering if this emissions thing is done independently, or if they are able to fudge that. Here is what I found for the stove I am considering, and it sounds good, almost too good. This is from the Englander Stoves website.

    One of the most advanced, most unique
    large firebox wood burners (ours has 3.5 cu. ft.) ...
    Super-clean burn (1.63 grams/hr.)
    makes this the cleanest-burning large firebox
    on the market!
    Potential of 75,000+ BTU's*
    when burning seasoned cordwood!
    High-tech firebox design
    (non-catalytic) for cleaner burn,
    more heat and more efficient burn times!
    E.P.A. Certified!
     
  20. JennNY

    JennNY Mom to 6 great kids!

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    We bought a Drolet stove last year and have been very pleased with it. Our local stove dealer said they were very good stoves, tho we didn't buy from them. They highly recommended them. So, I don't know what to tell you.. not sure why some did not like them.

    Jenn