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· SM Entrepreneuraholic
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The amount of D3 one takes is based on your Vitamin D, 25-Hydroxy, Total, Immunoassay lab test, which costs about $40 if you pay out of pocket, but your insurance or Medicare should pay for it. There is no agreement on exactly what your vitamin D level should be, but at least 30 ng/ml is fairly standard. Many doctors use rates similar to the ones in this table. As I am considered high risk and have heart disease, I keep mine around 70 ng/ml. I had a cancer scare several years ago, and pushed it up to 100 ng/ml.



I have genetic snps that result in my body not efficiently converting sunlight to vitamin D, so I have to supplement at a high level. The only way to know how much vitamin d3 a person needs to take, is to test. I take 10,000 IUs in the summer and 15,000 IUs in the winter. That is more than most people need or should take, but the only way to know is to test.

Vitamin D frees up calcium, which is both good and bad. You need to take Vitamin K with vitamin d3 to route the free calcium to your teeth and bones, otherwise it could collect in your heart and arteries.

Vitamin D should be taken with fat, so take it with a meal. Many people also take magnesium with vitamin d.
 

· SM Entrepreneuraholic
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Once more tme-- about ten y/a, it became the fad to publish papers that showed how various deseases are associated with low Vit D levels. It seems that just about all of them are...Two problems with this-- if low D is a CAUSE of a disease, then thiose whith low D should all be suffereing from more than one disease associated with that..But they are NOT....Secondly, if low D is causing a disease, then taking the extra D should cure the diesase, BUT, except for the obvious rickets/osteomalacia thing, no disease has yet to be shown to have better outcomes nor be prevented when extra D is taken.

BTW- real bad advice given above about Vit K2-- Warfarin works by affecting Vit K participation in the coagulation cascade-- at most doses it reverses the effect of warfarin. 'At higher dose it can enhance the effects.....Nobody with normal GI function needs to take ANY Vit K. The bowel flora provide us all we need....True, some studies have shown that osteopenia responds a little better to treatment with D + K, but there are risks if warfarin is also being taken... Blood clots can kill you fast. but, I've never heard of an emergency ostreopnia problem that requires immediate correction.
I think you are conflating taking vitamin d3 to increase vitamin d level to prevent or minimize disease and taking it after one becomes sick.

One reason that some of the research studies and clinical trials of vitamin D supplementation showed no positive results is that the doses used may have been too low.​
A study came out a couple of years ago claiming there was a statistical error in the calculation for the recommended daily vitamin D intake.[ref] This error changed the supplemental doses needed by a factor of 10. Instead of 600 IU, some people may need 6,000IU+ per day. Other recent studies have backed this up, showing also that a person’s weight plays a big role in the amount of vitamin D needed for sufficiency.​
A recent meta-analysis combining data from 52 different trials found that vitamin D supplementation did not impact overall mortality rates, but it did decrease the risk of death from cancer.​
 

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I take 5000 IU of D3 and that has boosted my vitamin D levels. In winter months I have increased to 7500 IU. My levels are near the top end. I would not go with 30,000 IU - Vitamin D is fat soluble to it can build up. You might be safer off starting with 10,000 IU and then monitoring your levels with a blood test at the clinic.
 

· SM Entrepreneuraholic
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I agree you shouldn't take K2 with warfarin/Coumadin. Otherwise it's OK and facilitates absorption.

My question does serum blood levels equate to actual use by the body or is it circulating and of unknown use?

Vitamin K2 and Blood Clotting. Is it Safe for Those on Blood Thinners?
Inside your cells, vitamin D binds to the vitamin D receptor (VDR). This then causes VDR to get together with a couple of other proteins (one is a vitamin A-related receptor) and bind to different spots on the nuclear DNA. This activates the transcription of certain genes. In fact, vitamin D controls the expression of about 3% of the human genome. So, yeah, it’s pretty important.

Additionally, vitamin D can act as a hormone within cells to immediately cause non-DNA-related actions to take place – such as opening ion channels or causing the secretion of insulin.

 

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The bowel flora provide us all we need....
Have you read data on whether a diet high in processed foods and/or low in certain nutrients affects the population of the right microbes to accomplish this? I'm wondering because it seems like a lot of health oriented outlets talk about Americans being VitaminD deficient.
 

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I think you are conflating taking vitamin d3 to increase vitamin d level to prevent or minimize disease and taking it after one becomes sick.

One reason that some of the research studies and clinical trials of vitamin D supplementation showed no positive results is that the doses used may have been too low.​
A study came out a couple of years ago claiming there was a statistical error in the calculation for the recommended daily vitamin D intake.[ref] This error changed the supplemental doses needed by a factor of 10. Instead of 600 IU, some people may need 6,000IU+ per day. Other recent studies have backed this up, showing also that a person’s weight plays a big role in the amount of vitamin D needed for sufficiency.​
A recent meta-analysis combining data from 52 different trials found that vitamin D supplementation did not impact overall mortality rates, but it did decrease the risk of death from cancer.​
A) No study has shown concluselvely that any disease has improved outcomes with taking D supplements. The conclusions from the meta-analyses are flimsy at best.

2) mathematical logic-- If low D causes disease A at a rate of X%, and low D causes disease B at a rate of Y%, then we should se both X & Y in >XY % of people, but we dont't., ergo, low D can't be the cause of at lleast one of the diseases....and since taking extra D does not prevent or improve either X or Y, problbly both have low D as a RESULT of the diseases, not a cause....Cf- "Anemia" is present in just about all chronic diseases...Does anemia "cause" them all, or is it a general result of illness?

3). Th bell shaped curve of Vit D levels is cosiderably lower for a population of Americans of African heritage when compared to that for Americans of European heritage, yet osteopenia is decidedly unusual in blacks and fairly common in whites....It's much more than the Vit D level that matters.

In so far as supplements go, plant sources of "Vit D" (not a single molecule, but, rather, a group of similar molecules) cannot be turned into effective Vit D by a human. Vit D metabolism is a complex process involving chemical actions in skin, liver and kidney....If you take Vit D from a plant source, just throw it directly into the toilet to save time.

I always recommended using the chain store generic brands of "Calcium Antacid Tablets with D"-- cheapest, adequate dose with nothing to recommend any other form over it.
 

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Extremely difficult to overdose on vitamin d.
But not impossible. So why take something that in the long run isn't needed and risk it happening. Especially at the dosages I saw some mentioning.

A doc and tests are the only safe answer.

And yes, being low on D does have physical impacts. I hurt everywhere. It made no sense. I was sent to an endocrinologist that found I was D deficient.
 

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But not impossible. So why take something that in the long run isn't needed and risk it happening. Especially at the dosages I saw some mentioning.

A doc and tests are the only safe answer.

And yes, being low on D does have physical impacts. I hurt everywhere. It made no sense. I was sent to an endocrinologist that found I was D deficient.
You have a good point about taking extra when not indicated-- it won't do any good and can cause harm. Hypercalcemia and unwanted calcium deposition in arteries and joints is not uncommon.

What was your bone density score? What were your calcium & phosphorus blood levels?...If all normal, then you weren't "Vit D deficient" but merely had a low, but physiologically adequate level...Being an adult and 4'6" makes you "abnormal" but not necessarily unhealthy...

.If you had aches & pains that were corrected by extra D, then you probably had low bone density. Several times I correctly suspected, then diagnosed hyerparathyroidism in patients (including myself)- a not uncommon problem- excess parathyroid hormone leads to mobilizing Ca out of bones (particularly hands & feet) based on unusual pain. It can be quite painful without the typical signs of inflammation seen in arthritis.

Vit D defieiciency is unusual in anyone who drinks commerical milk because they usually add it in. Cheese & ice cream don't count because they may be made of big batch milk and not have it added.
 

· SM Entrepreneuraholic
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But not impossible. So why take something that in the long run isn't needed and risk it happening. Especially at the dosages I saw some mentioning.

A doc and tests are the only safe answer.

And yes, being low on D does have physical impacts. I hurt everywhere. It made no sense. I was sent to an endocrinologist that found I was D deficient.
Vitamin D toxicity, also called hypervitaminosis D, is a rare but potentially serious condition that occurs when you have excessive amounts of vitamin D in your body.​
Vitamin D toxicity is usually caused by large doses of vitamin D supplements — not by diet or sun exposure. That's because your body regulates the amount of vitamin D produced by sun exposure, and even fortified foods don't contain large amounts of vitamin D.​
...​
Taking 60,000 international units (IU) a day of vitamin D for several months has been shown to cause toxicity.​
The OP said she was going to take 40,000 IU. Some doctor's recommend a high dosage for a short period of time to quickly buildup the level of vitamin d in the blood. That wouldn't be a dosage someone should take on a daily basis for a long period of time. As we both have said, testing is the only way to know if you are taking the right amount.
 

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You have a good point about taking extra when not indicated-- it won't do any good and can cause harm. Hypercalcemia and unwanted calcium deposition in arteries and joints is not uncommon.

What was your bone density score? What were your calcium & phosphorus blood levels?...If all normal, then you weren't "Vit D deficient" but merely had a low, but physiologically adequate level...Being an adult and 4'6" makes you "abnormal" but not necessarily unhealthy...

.If you had aches & pains that were corrected by extra D, then you probably had low bone density. Several times I correctly suspected, then diagnosed hyerparathyroidism in patients (including myself)- a not uncommon problem- excess parathyroid hormone leads to mobilizing Ca out of bones (particularly hands & feet) based on unusual pain. It can be quite painful without the typical signs of inflammation seen in arthritis.

Vit D defieiciency is unusual in anyone who drinks commerical milk because they usually add it in. Cheese & ice cream don't count because they may be made of big batch milk and not have it added.
I was at 3. It's been too many years to remember the rest of it. Or he didn't mention it at all. Which isn't that uncommon with so many when it comes to divulging all blood values.

And we can talk sun exposure all we want. I was dark enough that he questioned my ethnicity. So spending time in the sun is not enough for all of us. And now with heart failure I've been forbidden to be out in the heat.
 

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I'm looking at supplements for Vitamin D in order to get a larger dose each day more easily. Research is saying 40k IU is good so that is wat I'm considering. Does anyone in here take Vit D; and if so, how much and what have you experienced while taking it?
I take 5K of D3 daily per my MD's advice. I have had no side effects at all. I take chewables just because I prefer them.
 

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How much D, really depends more on your target blood serum level. During the beginning of Covid (a), a study showed no death with serum level above 70 and almost nothing above 50. So i took about 10k day, I was on a jobsite -40 outside, worked then basically stuck in a cabin for a month with two guys with covid, was supposed to be a 2 wk work trip, which turned into a lock down. Even though they were coughing every min-two, running fevers, nothing while taking Vit D, 3 days after running out of my 2 wk supply of 10k day, my temp increased to 99, over by the end of the day, I'm not sure if I coughed once. They lost taste smell etc. me nothing like. N=1 study..

Already covered, Test your blood serum level pick target. I think I recall something like a serum level of 200 plus for awhile is a problem. The more you take, the higher your serum level, the less it's absorbed, so it becomes harder and harder to reach a toxic level, and Vit D take up is effected by age and weight. It's fat soluble and so if overweight or underweight will effect, serum levels. Sunlight exposure, both in terms of how much your outside and how much your skin is exposed should be taken into consideration. Testing in summer vs winter will likely change things.

Also consider that Sunlight, offers more, Melatonin is largely generated by sunlight on the skin, last I read, about 90% is supplied by the skin with sunlight, one of the most powerful anti oxidants in the body, helping to resolve the double bonds of unsaturated fats.. Oddly, this wasn't known for quite some time, and the Melatonin made by the brain, is to supply anti oxidants during sleep when there is no sunlight.

For me, if I have a choice, sunlight, is a better source of D, cause I get Melatonin also. Living up north, not much choice.

Almost forgot. Had a runny enough nose, and back of the nasal cavity congestion most of my life. I now breathe easier.
 
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