vineyard prunning

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by vulcan, Nov 8, 2006.

  1. vulcan

    vulcan Well-Known Member

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    When is a good time to trim the vineyards. Thanks, for your help. vulcan :hobbyhors
     
  2. Pat

    Pat Well-Known Member

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    Just read in Old Farmers Almanac [almanac@yankeepub.com] that November is the prime month to prune vineards.

    GARDENING -- NOVEMBER CHORES

    * Prune grapevines.

    From University Of Illinois
    http://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/fruit/grapes.html

    Grapes require severe annual pruning early each spring to remain productive. Grapes flower and produce fruit only on one-year-old canes. The most productive wood is on the 6 to 8 buds closest to the base of the cane. Canes with moderate vigor and about the diameter of a pencil are most productive. So pruning is needed to encourage new canes to develop, eliminate unproductive canes, train fruiting canes, and limit the number of buds on the vine. When done properly, pruning often removes 80 to 90 percent of the wood. Pruning is suggested after the coldest part of winter but before buds swell. February and early March are good times.

    Various training systems can be followed when pruning, with the Four-Cane Kniffin one of the more popular. This system ends up with a central trunk and four one-year-old lateral canes, or arms, supported by trellis wires. Each arm has 6 to 12 buds, for a total of 35 or more buds on the entire plant. Each bud produces two or three clusters of grapes. Two renewal spurs are left at each trellis wire for future fruiting canes. All other growth essentially is removed each year to leave this framework.

    Pat
     

  3. WisJim

    WisJim Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Spring.

    Grapes can be pruned later than many fruit trees, and you want to wait until the worst winter weather is over so that you can also prune out winter damage that you may notice.
     
  4. vulcan

    vulcan Well-Known Member

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    Thanks our worst part of winter is January. So I am planning to go prunning in February. Thanks.