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ImageUploadedByHomesteading Today1414980172.364270.jpg I got a very good deal on three new gilts. The big black gilt (not pictured) is overweight and these two in front are very thin and half her size. They're all the same age, born late 2013. The scrawny ones are from the same litter. Do you think they're so thin because the large one was bullying them away from feed or is this a case of genetics? I was really hoping to butcher two and keep the red one to breed, but maybe that's a bad idea? Will they gain weight if given ample room and feed or will they be a money pit? I live in North Dakota and winter is on our heels. I wormed them as soon as the previous owner left.
 

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Previous owner was feeding only corn and oats. We'll be feeding wheat, oats, barley, pumpkins, scraps, and lots of hay. I'm guessing they are mineral deficient too. I gave them some kelp meal and minerals too. By the way the gilt in the back of this pic is one I raised from a weaner using this method. She seems just right. Big and firm. Not flabby or skinny.
 

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Previous owner was feeding only corn and oats. We'll be feeding wheat, oats, barley, pumpkins, scraps, and lots of hay. I'm guessing they are mineral deficient too. I gave them some kelp meal and minerals too. By the way the gilt in the back of this pic is one I raised from a weaner using this method. She seems just right. Big and firm. Not flabby or skinny.
Corn and oas does not make a pig skinny. Give them all they can eat and they should look a lot different in 60 days.

Also Ivermectin 1.87%
 

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I agree with Walter: worms. If they have a very heavy worm load they may take a few wormings to get totally cleaned out. I would use a "chemical" wormer on them as they look to be in pretty bad shape. The faster they are clean the sooner they start putting on weight.
 

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I wormed with safeguard. Any others you'd recommend? I have them in a separate pen for now with unlimited feed, pumpkins, hay and what pasture is left (white clover and quack grass). They don't have shelter in that pen though and it's below freezing every night now. We put a big round bale in for them. Guess I'll be building extra pens with shelter next year. Any other advice is appreciated.
 

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Wormy and malnourished. I'd be concerned about the damage that might have been done to the reproductive system of the two skinny gilts.

Get them de-wormed and on a quality feed with vitamins and trace minerals if you intend to attempt to breed them.
 

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We were planning on butchering the white one already once she gets some weight put on. The red is the one I was hoping to keep to breed eventually and she is small sized, but not nearly as thin as the white one.
 

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Do they have access to water 24 x 7? All the food in the world won't put weight on a pig that is dying of thirst. Not saying that is the problem but it can be.
 

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Well I just got these pigs yesterday, so I don't know if they were not getting enough water before. They are now. The third pig that came with them is overweight. They all lived together.
 

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If all three were in the same pen and one is fat and the other two are skinny, it sounds like one of them made a pig of herself. Hope that a good worming and plenty of good groceries will get your girls up to where they need to be! Good luck!
 

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Pigs die very quickly of thirst. If they're alive, they have water is a reasonable assumption. The problem really looks like they're not getting the nutrients even if they're eating. That is an indicator of intestinal parasites, worms. It can also be simply a congenital defect. Deworming them was the right thing to do. Follow the directions on the package and then do it again, typically 21 days later.

If you do have a bullying problem then putting three separate feeders apart from each other may resolve that. Otherwise separating the bully helps.

-Walter
 
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