Verticillium Wilt

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Cindy in NY, Jul 30, 2005.

  1. Cindy in NY

    Cindy in NY Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We have managed to get what appears to be verticillium wilt in a couple of our vegetables beds. The top leaves on the pepper plants kind of wilted but never fell off and the fruit got gray when it was small and rotted. The potatoes looked good for a long time. Then instead of dying back in the normal way, they started dying back from the ground up. We have used a fungicide on both beds and cut back a couple of pepper plants and pulled another couple (we still have a couple that don't seem to be too badly infected). Also, the cukes that are in the same bed as the peppers have loads of blooms but no fruit.

    Questions -

    Any problem eating the potatoes, assuming there are any?

    What should we do to avoid this in the future? Rotate beds? I purchased my pepper plants. Is it possible that these were not disease resistant and that's what caused the problem?

    Thanks for your help!
     
  2. sullen

    sullen Question Answerer

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    I have Verticulum Wilt in my yard, and it was never even planted or used for anything before. I almost lost a sugar maple to it before I found out. My friend told me to pinch off the branches and the leaves that look affected. I rotated, but they found my Zuchini again anyway. The tree is all the way across the yard, even. He said it has been there and will not go away. So far I am OK if I just pinch and burn the affected leaves.
     

  3. woodspirit

    woodspirit Well-Known Member

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    verticillium wilt is one of four groups of wilt. Don't take off the leaves since it is a vascular disease that the plant gets from the soil. Trees and even some vegetables will grow beyond the affected part and survive and thrive just fine. usually kills annuals and vegs though.can affect rhody's and other plants too. crop rotation is the way and also look for thr letters V, or V.F. or V.F.N on the plant tags when buying vegetables. In the case of rhody's the only option is to dig up, wash soil off roots and transplant in other spot.
    yes the potatoes are fine to eat
     
  4. Cindy in NY

    Cindy in NY Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I've heard that the cure is to douse the soil with fungacide and cover it with black plastic for the winter. Any truth to that?
     
  5. woodspirit

    woodspirit Well-Known Member

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    no.
    you could get the soil fumigated, but that would have to be done by a licensed applicator using chemicals that you need a permit to use and possess.The way it works is that it kills every living thing in the soil. plant, animal, insect, and fungus, as well as wilts which are not actually a fungus. you can't grow anything there for about a year.
    Best thing to do is rotate crops and not use plants unless they are resistant.
    wish I had another option for you. But I don't know it myself.