Vermont Castings wood stoves

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by McLeod, Oct 17, 2005.

  1. McLeod

    McLeod Member

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    Just wondering if anybody is using the cast iron stoves VC makes, and in particular the Dutch West brand. Are they a good stove? Thanks McLeod
     
  2. crashy

    crashy chickaholic goddess

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    WE have one and it works really well it even will burn coal. About 15 years ago I had one that burned 12in. wood just a lil one it worked great!!! Both were very heavy. I looked on the back and it is a Dutch west extra large heater. The only thing I wish we had got was the rocker arms I hate scooping out the ashes. This one will even take a fan but I am not sure how that works.
     

  3. Ramblin Wreck

    Ramblin Wreck Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I've used a Vermont Castings stove for 6 years and have nothing but good things to say about it. Heats the house completely on most winter days, with a little help from the ceiling fans to circulate the air.
     
  4. wayfarer

    wayfarer Active Member

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    We have a small burgandy Intrepid ll and we bought it used...it is wonderful.
    It heats 1100 sq feet..and we have high ceilings and wood floors...will burn all night if we stock it right before we go to bed.
     
  5. Selena

    Selena proud to be pro-choice

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    I have a Reliant that is 20 years old - it burns wood or coal. Wouldn't trade it for the world. Basic black cast iron heat generatin' beast!
     
  6. McLeod

    McLeod Member

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    Good thanks for the info. Just ordered the largest Dutch West non-cat heater today and I have to admit I was impressed with what I saw in the owners manual. I just wanted to confirm that with actual users. One of the most important features for me was the standard outside combustion air connection, as well as being over 400 pounds and supporting secondary combustion. I can hardly wait to replace my wood burning fireplace with the heater. McLeod
     
  7. crashy

    crashy chickaholic goddess

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    Yup they are REALLY heavy. Hubby and I did ours man that was tough!!
     
  8. Selena

    Selena proud to be pro-choice

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    Ours has the top load as well as the front doors - you can cook on the "griddle", it appears to be stainless steel. Usually only have water on it but can use it to cook in an emergency. I'd be tempted to stick a pot of soup on it but I'd have to find a cast iron pot with a good lid AND a handle as we usually load wood from the top. We do need new gloves, I'm tired of burning my finger with the right hand glove and as I am not left-handed, using the other glove can be tricky. I really need a small pair for me and a large sized pair for spouse.
     
  9. diane

    diane Well-Known Member

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    We have heated our 900 square feet with an Acclaim for 17 years. I cook soup on it all winter long. Love that little beast!!! We just added 600 square feet and will have a wood cookstove in the addition (not hooked up yet) but in these 30 degree nights we are having the VC has heated the whole thing toasty warm. They are a bit pricy for the original investment......but these days will payback in a couple of years of heating costs.
     
  10. affenpinschermom

    affenpinschermom Well-Known Member

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    The same VC, the Vigilant, has heated our homes for our entire marriage. We even moved it when we moved from the U.P. of Mich. to Kentucky. A home just wouldn't feel the same without it. We wouldn't have any other kind. We are building another home on our property and we are going to buy another one. They are worth every penny. I cook on mine all winter.
     
  11. amelia

    amelia Well-Known Member

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    I've had a VC Interpid for about 20 years now and love it. It is the primary source of heat for my 560 SF home, quite sufficient to keep the place toasty even when the temps drop to 20 or so.

    If I were in an area with a more severe climate, I would choose a larger stove (VC has plenty of choices) because the small size of the Intrepid requires fairly constant re-fueling and because it does not hold enough wood to burn through the night (at least not without sooty damping down). Also, if I lived in a more severe region I might choose a model without the glass doors. Although I love the design and being able to watch the fire, the glass doors require fairly constant cleaning unless you're religious about making sure the fire is always burning hot.

    After 20 years, my VC still looks just like it did the day I bought it, and it performs valiantly.
     
  12. wvstriper

    wvstriper Member

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    I have used a Dutchwest for the last 2 years. The air controls can take a little time to get used to. The manual will give you the basic operation, but everyone's setup is a little different. Not a big deal, just keep it in mind ;) BTW, I'm selling mine if any one's interested (just got a good deal on a VC Encore).