Vegies all year

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Cara, Oct 7, 2005.

  1. Cara

    Cara Well-Known Member

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    I am reading Elliot Coleman's "Four Season Harvest" again, and I was wondering if any of you grow all year. I am in western OR and that makes it a little tougher to keep things going because it's so damp here in the winter most things grow mold. I also have trouble timing when to plant to have the vegies at the right size to be harvestable in winter. Do you have any experiences to share?
     
  2. mistletoad

    mistletoad Well-Known Member Supporter

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  3. Charleen

    Charleen www.HarperHillFarm.com Supporter

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    We plant lettuce on Labor Day weekend. After germination we cover with a floating row cover because of the bunnies. Once the weather turns bad we set up the cold frame around it with glass tops. We've eaten fresh lettuce right up until the end of the year. Some varieties are better suited for this than others.
     
  4. Cara

    Cara Well-Known Member

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    MIstletoad....I forgot about the extension...thanks! You are in Maryland? I know you get some "good" storms there, but is your whole winter very cold? We usually hae 7-10 days of 20-30 degrees, and the rest is just rain, rain, rain. So besides the moisture problem, we also have vey low light levels. How mature are your vegies right now, and when did you put them in?

    Charleen, Is your winter lettuce in raised beds? That's the only way we could get away from the standing water, I think. If we planted on labor day, we would usually have about 3-4 weeks of dry warm weather before the rains start. How big are your plants now?
     
  5. Haynes

    Haynes Well-Known Member

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    I take collards, swiss chard and romaine lettuce thru the winters here.
    Unless a nasty ice storm has its way.

    Donnie--
     
  6. Charleen

    Charleen www.HarperHillFarm.com Supporter

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    Cara,

    No they're not raised beds, but our gardens have been heavily fertilized and mulched with bedding from the barn & goats. We had a spurt of really warm weather (80) followed by rain and high temps of 50. Plants are probably about 2 inches high right now, not ready to harvest yet.

    We planted radishes too, but they didn't germinate as well as the lettuce.
     
  7. kathy H

    kathy H kathyh

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    Here in the California mountains I bend pvc over my beds [ makes a u over bed] and push it into cinder blocks on each side. I use 4mil plastic from hardware store and for about ten bucks have a large hoop house to grow in in winter.
     
  8. tonto

    tonto Well-Known Member

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    I'm in N California also, near Monterey.

    I've found that some things only grow in the winter here, at least for me.

    In the fall I start lettuce and onions in flats in the house and transplant
    them out when the rains start.

    Things like garlic, carrots, swiss chard and spinach I plant directly in
    the ground and keep them watered until the rains start.

    I can't grow any of the above in the summer.

    -tonto
     
  9. georgiarebel

    georgiarebel Well-Known Member

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    I've got Collards, Broccoli, and Cauliflower planted now from local hardware store transplants. With plans to plant some carrots and radish from seed this weekend. I just wish I was more organized to grow plants from seeds that I've started, but I usually let time slip up on me and purchase store bought transplants to try and squeeze in the season. Would also like to plant some onion bulbs, and try to grow potatoes in wire baskets. I've read about in on the internet, but have never tried it. Anyone have luck growing potatoes this way?

    GR
     
  10. Cara

    Cara Well-Known Member

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    I haven't tried potatoes in baskets. I did tires one year and what the mice didn't get :mad: were good, but not a good judge of yield. We have a little trouble with them rotting, also, if we have a late spring.

    Tonto, when do you start the lettuce and onions? And when are they ready for harvest? I think you get more winter sun than we do, as well as a longer day length, but not that much. I'm a little sketchy on the geography of CA....we are about half way down I5 and slightly west, so how many miles from the border are you? Also do you do coverings or are the plants out?

    We are about 15 miles from Territorial seed, so I have access to everything I might want, but the timing is such a big part of it!
     
  11. Mutti

    Mutti Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Here in southern MO I have turnip greens,spinach,chard,lettuce, onions and leeks plus late green beans that if I protect with the first one or two predicted frosts I can be eating into November. Want to learn more about this with the price of every veggie going up. DEE
     
  12. SquashNut

    SquashNut Well-Known Member

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    Right now I have raddishes, bok choy, lettuce, mustard greens, chard, leeks, parsnips, carrots, green onions, broccolli and 1 last head of cabbage.
    I'll bring in the greens when I think the weather gets too cold and freeze them. But the root crops and leeks can be muched for the winter. I start back up in January under lights in the house and move the stuff to a cold frame as soon as I can.
    I tryed beets but they don't seem to be growing. Good thing I had a good spring crop that is in canning jars now.
     
  13. tonto

    tonto Well-Known Member

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    Hi Cara,

    I usually start the lettuce and onions about the first week of October. I
    have two flats of onions under grow lights right now. I'm late on the
    lettuce - I just started a few flats yesterday. I typically have lettuce
    and green onions available by Thanksgiving. Of course that depends on
    the rains and the snails and other bugs.

    Once the rains start I start the carrots and lettuce directly in the
    garden. That way I have stuff ready (hopefully) all winter and into
    the spring. The lettuce usually bolts by June. I pull the onions all
    winter/spring and usually harvest what's left around June also.

    I'm about two hours South of San Francisco, so I'm quite a ways from
    the Oregon border.

    I don't cover anything in the winter garden. But in the Spring, I use
    floating row cover on the squash and cucumbers. Otherwise something
    eats them every time.

    Wow, 15 miles from Territorial Seed. That's cool. I'd love to visit them.
    And you're right, timing in a garden is everything!

    -tonto