Vegetable Road Stands

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by moonwolf, Dec 1, 2004.

  1. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    I'm sure there are many out there who are on along a road and market fresh garden vegetables with a display from a stand.
    I have never tried this and not sure what the response would be. The situation here is that there is the major highway route 6 miles down the secondary highway where I am currently. Summer tourist traffic with a lot of fishermen and vacationers come through and casual advertising with locals by word of mouth could get them interested in buying if I planned a market garden idea.
    There are a few large growers already well known that function with farm gate selling of their garden produce. There is a nursery down the road who sell hothouse vegetables in season, but mostly their sales are at weekly farmer's market where they have a staff committed to go and do well there. I couldn't probably manage involvement at that level, but a roadside vegetable stand might work. My concern is whether it's feasable. I guess maybe just put up a stand and when available with stuff to sell and time to be there have a big 'OPEN' sign and hope for the best.

    What are your experiences with growing market gardens and setting up a site with a stand to sell direct this way to passing customers? The prospects of drawing people to your store if it is a 20 minute drive from the nearest sizeable town, and that a scattered local population might support a bit of what you sell. I think selling fresh eggs would be a draw for potential customers to have a 'look see' even if locals grow garden. What also is good to grow that your local population would not bother in their garden to grow and might want?
     
  2. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

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    You might just try selling Melons,Sweet Corn,and Tomatoes out of the back of your Pickup.See how that works.Then maybe work your way up to more Produce.

    big rockpile
     

  3. WV Rebel

    WV Rebel Well-Known Member

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    People LOVE Peaches and sweet cherries in season, too. And Bing (sour) cherries for pies in the holidays.
     
  4. steff bugielski

    steff bugielski Well-Known Member

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    I have been doing that for years. I have a large sign at the end of the driveway and a shed set up next to the garden. Town ordinance prohibits roadside stand, so mine is off the road. I have about 7,000 sq ft of garden space. I can sell about 3-5,000 dollars a year. Feasible to me.
    steff
     
  5. Steph in MT

    Steph in MT Well-Known Member

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    If you're in a small town you might talk to local business owners about setting up a stand at their location. I asked at our grocery store and they will buy local produce and our butcher shop has graciously offered to let me set up a stand in front of her shop. I'm excited about checking out the possibilities next season. ;)
    Good luck to you~
    Steph
     
  6. Mrs_stuart

    Mrs_stuart Well-Known Member

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    We do not have a stand or "real" produce but we sell eggs, goats milk, cheese, rabbits, lye soap and anything that we do have extra from the garden right from our house. We have a sign out by the road. We have smaller signs that can be removed or added according to what we have. sometimes it is just eggs and milk and some times it is eggs, milk, rabbits and lye soap...
    this way we can push just what we have. We have people just stop by and ring the bell, or what ever. We sold 2 of our fresh turkeys this way too...they saw and asked and we said sure, you can buy a turkey. Of course, we butcher and wrapped it for them but we sold for $3 per pound.
    We give more tours around our place, just because they stop to see if we have eggs. and We only have 1 acre...

    Belinda
     
  7. fin29

    fin29 Well-Known Member

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    You'll probably need a building and land use permit from your town. You'll have to explain to them that the traffic generated by your stand won't interfere with traffic flow on the road you're on and that there will be adequate parking to prevent customers from parking on the side of the road, creating a hazard. Then they'll ding you for $10 or $15, those communists... :haha:

    Seriously, though, the only other suggestion I have is to put wheels on any structure you build for your stand, even if it's a small building. You'll be able to bypass building permit requirements that way.

    No wheels=Building
    Wheels=Machine

    Just a little tip from your friendly code skirter.
     
  8. seedspreader

    seedspreader AFKA ZealYouthGuy

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    Do you have a dairy license? If not how do you stay out of trouble with the milk and cheese? I know you can put "for pets only" on your milk, but what about cheese? When you say you sold 2 fresh turkeys, are you certified as a butcher too?
     
  9. Hank - Narita

    Hank - Narita Well-Known Member

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    The best way to sell your vegies at your farm is to join the chamber of commerce. Ours has a list of local farms, what they sell, where they are located, and has a small map. They are distributed around the whole state. Our neighbor was a member last year and sold lots from their advertising. We might do the same.
     
  10. Mrs_stuart

    Mrs_stuart Well-Known Member

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    Hi ZealYouthGuy...Sorry i miss this earlier, but better late than never, i guess. First, No, i dont have a dairy license...I am no a dairy and do not clain to be one. I do sell at the farmers markets and such and i sell from my home. I do not label my milk or cheese in any way. And no, we are not certified butchered. I sold live turkeys...I butchered these turkeys for free after they had been purchased. I have also butchered other peoples turkesy for free from their farm to teach them or because they just couldnt do it. There are many people around here that sell milk from their home...
    I sell it for consumption for humans, for fouls, rabbits and kennels with dogs...I even have signs up at our local vets, feed stores and grocery stores. I have different signs, some say for pet use and some say raw unpasturized goats milk. I sell eggs too the same way. I sell from home and at the farmers markets.
    The farmers market even advertises my milk, eggs, cheese in the local paper...

    Belinda
     
  11. 3girls

    3girls Well-Known Member

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    I loved selling at the Farmer's Market.

    It was one day/wk. I sold only what I had. I sold greens as a specialty, but muffins, cookies, eggs, flowers when I had enough.

    I got to meet lots of vendors and to know them personally. I met my customers, some of whom wanted me to keep in touch when I moved.

    It was the high point of my social life and about as exciting as I wanted to get!

    I loved setting up displays, using raffia, wheat, checked ribbon to decorate any potted plants. Pretty jars for odd jams--Kiwi jam (from Sunset) was a real hit.

    I wore the same sweat shirt and T-shirt each time and set up in the same place. I smiled til my face hurt.

    I left during my 3rd year, and could have made a lot more money with a lot better planning at home. I really loved it.

    Since I lived alone, I didn't want any kind of roadside stand. I never put my address on anything, although I did use my phone number. I know, not total security, but enough for the town I lived in.