vans

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by travis91, Nov 2, 2005.

  1. travis91

    travis91 Formerly 4animals.

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    i have read some old threads about cars that homesteaders drive ect. and many people said that some of you drive vans (workvans/minivans)and haul small livestock and small equnie in how do you do this? thanks
     
  2. Tracy in Idaho

    Tracy in Idaho Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My friend hauls all her animals, including a mini horse in her minivan --

    Pull the two back seats out, put down tarp with shavings over the top. Cut cattle panel to fit right behind front seats and bungie cord it in tightly. Load animal through side door. :)

    Works like a champ!

    Tracy
     

  3. Cheryl in SD

    Cheryl in SD Living in the Hills Supporter

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    Two months ago I took 2 goats to the neighbors to be bred. One went in the side door, the other into the hatch. Worked great. My neighbor thought I was nuts, but the goats didn't mind.

    Cheryl
     
  4. tobo6

    tobo6 Well-Known Member

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    I have a 78 1/2 ton chevy van and it's great for hauling things. I can take out all the seats except the front two and get 27 bales of hay in it. :goodjob: I've got over a 100 chickens in cages in it too, lol. Personally I like to haul things in it more then taking the truck because I don't have to worry about rain, and wind problems. It's all carpeted so I have a very heavy piece of plastic that I lay down to protect that, and when I am down hauling I just carefully pull the plastic out and hose it off and hang it for the next time.
     
  5. susanneb

    susanneb Well-Known Member

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    We haul our miniature horses in our 95 Ford Windstar...we first made certain that there was adequate headroom, so that they can stand without having to hold their heads at an unnatural level.

    We first lay down a plastic tarp, then a 5/8 inch sheet of plywood cut to fit EXACTLY so that it can't slip on the tarp. Next is a carpet pad, then lots of hay, both to munch and to absorb accidents (no, they won't eat what they've soiled). We only haul one at a time for safety sake, and we have a strong barrier behind the front seats

    Thanks to Bergere, we have use of a wheelchair ramp, which makes loading a breeze, then folds up and stows neatly.

    Other than drivers who get upset when you drive under the speed limit and try to maintain a distance behind other drivers (I've received many one finger salutes...), it works great. I like being able to keep an eye on them and not having them bounce around in a rough trailer ride. Our horses say they like the separate climate control and stereo console...

    The reactions of filling station attendants is hysterical...we have tinted windows, so nobody can see in unless they're up close or if we have the dome lights on at night, but the horses can see out, and our gelding, Mingus, loves to call out to kids on the street.

    Coming back from a show in Spanaway, Washington, I decided to grab some junk food for the road. I went for the drive-thru at Arby's and ordered curly fries. As I pulled up to the pick-up window, the guy opened the window and asked "Do you want Horsey Sauce with that?" Just then Mingus let loose with a resounding neigh! I thought the worker was going to fall over.

    Of course, now Mingus thinks he's a comedian!

    I have to add...my brothers are appalled that we would haul horses in our vehicle. One brother told my husband, "You know, every time you put a horse in there, it loses value." Keith, my husband, replied "No, the horse is worth just as much after he's been in the van."
     
  6. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    We use our van to pull a trailer for livestock now, although we did use the first van to carry sheep in the cargo area. Vans are far better than trucks IMO wider axles and better visability (with windows of course no side windows and they're terrible!) Chev at least seems to use better steel for thier vans ours is a 91 and only has very minimal rust despite Canadian winter roads. There were too many downsides to carrying stock in the van not the least was the lambs ability to overload one side of the van when you least expected them to, not really on corners as you might expect. They are better off in the trailer with better air and it's much easier to set up and go. It's also lower to the ground so loading is easier.
     
  7. Mrs_stuart

    Mrs_stuart Well-Known Member

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    We have a toyota van (85) and we haul everything in that thing...hay, goats, baby pigs, chickens, rabbits...
    We too remove the seats and throw them in, we do not use any restrains for the goats, they just have a halter on and the others are usually in cages or some type of carrier...
    vans are great because they are enclosed...

    Belinda
     
  8. Ed in S. AL

    Ed in S. AL Well-Known Member

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    If I were to put a critter in my wifes' van she would cut my throat. I didn't even bring a couple of ducks and a rooster home the other day after I bought them. My buddy delivered them.
     
  9. Jan Doling

    Jan Doling Well-Known Member

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    I have a 2000 Toyota Sienna with close to 200,000 miles on it. I looked at the 2005 models this year, but decided I already have the old one mucked up nicely into a Farmobile and will wait a few more years to break in another one.

    It has a hitch and a luggage rack, both of which come in handy on the homestead. When it is on its last legs, I'll let my oldes practice driving with it.
    Vehicles are meant to be driven, not cossetted.
     
  10. pookshollow

    pookshollow Pook's Hollow

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    I've hauled geese and goats in our '83 Ford Econoline. I've also hauled goats in my 2002 Sunfire :sing: not to mention bags of feed, bales of hay and shavings too! Ya know - ya may be a redneck if you know how many bales of hay your car holds :dance: Of course, these were young goats in a large pet carrier . . .
     
  11. Gary in ohio

    Gary in ohio Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I know a number of llama owners who use a fullsize van to transport their llama's. Llama's just jump up and are ready for a ride. Looks kind of funny when they stick there heads out the window.
     
  12. mamajohnson

    mamajohnson Knitting Rocks! Supporter

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    LOL! If you ever see a truck in front of mamajohnson, going nice and slow over the railroad tracks, you will hear this yell "IT'S A TRUCK!!! DRIVE IT LIKE ONE!!!!" Why go to the trouble to purchase a work type vehicle (vans are in that cat. for me) and not use it????? :eek:
     
  13. mamajohnson

    mamajohnson Knitting Rocks! Supporter

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    Oh, forgot to tell you, our 98 windstar is an excellent farmobile.... has carried pigs, goats, chickens, ducks, rabbits, hay, feed, and even human kids (sometimes in odd combinations too!) :)
     
  14. pookshollow

    pookshollow Pook's Hollow

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    You too! :p I once saw a honking big SUV slow down to about 3 miles an hour going over the tracks - you coulda heard me down to Florida :grump:
     
  15. jassytoo

    jassytoo Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We used to haul 2 ponies in a van to shows. They just loved looking out the front window and after the show we'd go through the McD's for their reward of french fries. As soon as we pulled up to the window they'd start whinneying. We used to take our goats to be bred in a VW bug. DH would take out the front seat and I'd get in the back and hold the goats collar. Sure must have looked strange driving down the road. DH peering out of one side of the windshied and the goats backside peering out the other. :)
     
  16. Alice In TX/MO

    Alice In TX/MO More dharma, less drama. Supporter

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    I have a 1991 Toyota Previa that I bought new. It has well over 300,000 miles on it. I also have a 1992 Previa that I lucked into last summer for $3,000. It has 130,000 miles on it.

    If you can get one, these vans are incredibly tough. I have NEVER had any transmission work or engine work, other than scheduled maintenance on either of them. They are still getting 23 to 25 miles per gallon.

    I've hauled hay, dogs, bicycles, football players, friends, and LOTS of other stuff, but never livestock. I would if necessary!
     
  17. travis91

    travis91 Formerly 4animals.

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    would a canvas tarp work better than a plastic one (they would not slip would they)?
     
  18. Danaus29

    Danaus29 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We got our van Rhino-lined. Stuff doesn't slide around and cleans up real nice. The other van had a vinyl mat. No critters in the car unless they are in carriers.