Homesteading Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
415 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Well, after all the worrying about the pump, the well has officially gone dry. Well guys will hopefully be out today to start setting up a big storage tank, but in the meantime, critters are out of water and hauling from the pond in 5 gallon buckets is getting old FAST!

I have a lot of those 55 gallon water drums, with two openings on the top. My husband is out of town (figures, doesn't it!) but he says there's a way to drill in a hose bib to one of those.

Anyone know how to do that? I could get those in my son's truck, take them to town and fill them up, and then drive around with a hose to fill the animals water if I can get a hose bib on it. I suppose I could also siphon, but I'm getting kind of old for that, LOL!!

Thanks for any suggestions! Of course, the pond is the low spot on the property, so no gravity feed from it to anywhere. I'm thinking these barrels are my only hope until the well gets fixed (could be days).

THANK YOU!

Tracey Mouse
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,341 Posts
The bungs in mine are already threaded for garden hose. I drill out the center inside the hose threads & attach a hose directly quite often. Remember to add hose washer. Laid on its side, with drilled hose threads on bottom & top bung removed to add water they make quite adequate gravity flow waterers.
 

·
Just howling at the moon
Joined
·
6,586 Posts
Google "making rain barrel" if you would like the spigot in the side of the barrel.

Here's one:
http://www.cityofbremerton.com/content/sw_makeyourownrainbarrel.html
Making a rain barrel is as easy as 1,2,3
Step 1


Use a 6" hole saw, a saber saw, a keyhole saw or a drywall saw to cut a perfectly round 6” hole on the top of your barrel.
Drill two holes with a 29/32” drill bit, one towards the top for an overflow and one towards the bottom of the barrel for the faucet.
Next use a 3/4" NPT pipe tap and twist it into the upper 29/32" hole, then untwist the tap and back it out of the hole, then repeat the same process for the lower 29/32" hole.
Rinse your barrel out thoroughly, as it previously had a food product in it. Avoid using bleach, as it is environmentally harmful in the storm drains. For an environmentally safe soap solution use 2 teaspoons of castile soap and 2 teaspoons of vinegar or lemon juice for every gallon of water used to clean your barrel.

View diagram
Step 2


Twist in the threaded side of the hose adapter into the 3/4" threaded hole towards the top of the barrel.
Prepare the threaded side of the brass faucet by:
Wrapping it tightly with teflon tape, make four or five rotations until all the threads are covered; or
Applying a thin ribbon of Kitchen and Bath All Purpose Adhesive Caulk, or similar sealant.
Twist in the threaded and now prepared end of the faucet into the 3/4" threaded hole towards the bottom of the barrel.
View diagram
Step 3

Cover the 6" hole in the top by placing the 6" louvered screen onto the barrel with the louvered side up and the screen side down.
Slide a hose onto the hose adapter at the top of barrel to direct the overflow water away from your home.
Place two cinder blocks under the selected downspout and place the barrel on this raised base.
Cut your downspout about 4" above the top of the barrel, add an elbow, and make any final adjustments to the base and barrel.
Add a hose on the faucet or keep it available to fill a watering can.
Enjoy your rainbarrel!
View diagram
Use only the appropiate steps
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
185 Posts
A 12v bilge pump from a store, or from a boat will draw the water up from that low pond, and run off the power point in a vehicle or direct off the battery. They can be had pretty cheap, and if you get one that you can attach a hose on the draw side, then it'll empty your barrels right quick.

Bulkhead fittings are easy to put in too, good luck with the water fetching.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
415 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for all the suggestion, everyone! This is just what I was looking for.

But, even better, my brother loaned me a small electric pump he had (used to use it for his basement) and it had a place to screw in a garden hose. So I stood in the pond and held it under the water while ds ran hoses up to the barn and garden and filled up buckets for the critters.

Tomorrow I will rig up a way to suspend it inside a small rabbit cage with a cheesecloth filter all around it, and set the whole contraption on a couple of concrete blocks at the bottom of the pond.

(Pond has like 6" of silt at the bottom and tons of stuff growing in it like seaweed sort of, so I don't want all that getting sucked into my brother's pump!)

I still might go ahead and set something up with the water barrels though, just for future use.

And, yes, we can get a truck pretty close to the pond, and right up to the animal areas.

THANKS AGAIN!

Tracey Mouse
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,869 Posts
OK here ya go....


This barrel has a spigot with an on/off flow valve on the left side.


The right side 'spigot' is connected to another barrel via a [R/V] (water grade) water hose (not important if you use a regular garden hose to supply water to the barrels


This is a closeup of the barrel tap for reference.


All fittings should be placed as near the bottom of the barrels as possible while providing a flat surface for them to seal. Water supply should enter the vertical barrel (center barrel is best) from the top. Regardless of how many barrels you 'daisy chain' they will fill uniformly and your total water storage will be 55 gallons X the number of barrels you fill. The 'battery of barrels should be at the highest elevation that is possible/convenient so that gravity is your friend for emptying them. Build a stand from cinder blocks or wood if necessary to elevate them - just keep in mind that a 55 gallon barrel of water weighs almost 400 lbs and the stand (if necessary) needs to be virtually level and strong enough to support the weight or the barrels may tip over as they fill.

good luck
Bill
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
698 Posts
I recently made a rain barrel from one of those blue barrels. Ours was missing one of the bungs when we got it. So, I flipped it over and put a 3"x3/4" galvanized bushing in it. I then put a 3/4" street 90 into that. A 6" nipple into that with a sillcock screwed to that. Then I built cribbing and flipped it over on top of the cribbing. Then cut a hole just big enough for the downspout to pass through in the now top, former bottom.

Our barrel had a recess around it's new top, so I drilled some small holes at the lowest part of the recess. Now my DW puts her potted plants on top of the rainbarrel when she waters them. That way the excess water just goes back into the barrel to be used again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
762 Posts
when we lived in manitoba we bought drums(1000ltrs) from the airport..They had had de-icer in them..antifreeze..We washed them out and bleached and washed again etc,,They were our source of watering the stock after the farm burnt down.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top