using frozen goats milk

Discussion in 'Dairy' started by catdance62, Dec 7, 2008.

  1. catdance62

    catdance62 Well-Known Member

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    This spring/summer my goats were giving more milk than I could keep up with so I decided to freeze some of it. I have subsequently tried to thaw some out (and then had to put it in the blender because it separated) and have tried to make yogurt (Salton yogurt maker/yogourmet starter) with NO success. It just wont set up. I made great yogurt with fresh milk this summer. Is it failing now because it has been frozen?
    Same goes for my chevre. It won't set up. Well, it'll set up a little, but not much. I just bought some new rennet (good quality, not junket) and chevre started because I thought that might be the problem--using old starter & rennet. But apparently not.
    I am frustrated! Any thoughts?
     
  2. Alice In TX/MO

    Alice In TX/MO More dharma, less drama. Supporter

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    I have not been successful using frozen milk, either.
     

  3. catdance62

    catdance62 Well-Known Member

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    Actually that does make me feel better--I'm not the only one! thanx!
     
  4. Rockytopsis

    Rockytopsis A & N Lazy Pond Farm Supporter

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    Never tried it myself, but I read on another forum that the frozen milk when thawed can be used to make butter in a blender. You might try that.
     
  5. Laverne

    Laverne Well-Known Member

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    Maybe it would make ricotta. Especially if it's already kinda separated. I use ricotta like chevre and it's pretty good. Especially with garlic and dill or basil.
     
  6. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    From this coming week until my does freshen in March, all the milk in the house for my kefir, my GB's yogurt and cheese, all comes from frozen milk (oh and soap and fresh drinking). I do let it naturally defrost in the fridge, and since I sell my milk frozen, the does are milked, milk is strained as they are milked (machine) the milk is immediatly poured into 1/2 gallon milk jugs, frozen and kept in a freezer with the defrost timer turned off. I never have problems with my milk seperating this way. Two of the gals who make cheese locally for resale purchase frozen milk from me during the year also. Not sure why you would be having problems making cheese from frozen milk, it doesn't change the milk at all.

    Another thought is to simply make cheese all spring and summer and freeze it, cherve freezes nicely. Just don't herb it up and then freeze it, the herbs don't do well then. Vicki
     
  7. LizD

    LizD Well-Known Member

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    Freezing milk, particularily cow or goat, damages the membrane around the fat globules, much the same way that churning to make butter does. This usually causes the fat to float freely making a separation so that fat would be lost to the curd in the cheesemaking process. Also the fat without it's protective coating is more vulnerable to 'off' flavours and/ or capilase/lipase introduction which increases the rick of bitterness developing in aged cheese. These 'free floating' fat bits turn into free flowing fatty acids which affects the activity of your starter culture too. Liz
     
  8. Charleen

    Charleen www.HarperHillFarm.com Supporter

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    I've never had much success with frozen milk. I will still freeze it when plentiful and feed it to goat kids in an emergency and will use it for my soapmaking but to drink it or use it for yogurt - no. And I've tried many different ways of freezing and thawing. :clap: Congrats to you if you're able to make it work.
     
  9. Jotun

    Jotun Well-Known Member

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    freezing goat milk is an excellent way of useing up valuable room in your freezer that could be put to better use. would be nice if everything went as perfectly for the rest of us as they seem to for Vicki however the idea of freezing cheese is excellent and should have positive results for any one.
    Jotun
     
  10. Rawhanna

    Rawhanna New Member

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    Catdance,

    I've been using frozen goat's milk and without separation: I drink it straight from the 1/2 gallon container (shame on me), sometimes with added honey (yum!) and have been even using it for egg-nog this season. No problems. I'm also using it for making yogurt (served with honey again) and doing quick ferments with kefir grains and adding store bought, plain sour yogurt for starter to make yogurt and yogurt cheese (labneh).

    However, I only thaw my milk out in the fridge, which takes a couple days. I also notice that goat milk retains a higher quality after freezing (in my experience) than does cow's milk, both in taste and texture. Perhaps it's because goat is naturally more homogenized than cow's milk and doesn't suffer the breakdown? Who knows.

    Try thawing it out slowly in the fridge and see if that solves your problem.

    Best,
    Rob
     
  11. mdharris68

    mdharris68 Well-Known Member

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    My wife has froze excess goats milk for the past four years with no problems whatsoever. One thing we always do is chill the milk first. Also, our freezer is the old type without any defrost cycle. Our milk is never separated, and always tastes as good as fresh and lasts a couple weeks in the fridge.

    To avoid separating milk always follow hygenic milking and milk handling procedures, i.e. chilling milk to 40 degrees in thirty minutes before putting in a freezer WITHOUT auto defrost. Best of luck.
     
  12. cmharris6002

    cmharris6002 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have read this for years and have never found it to be true for properly handled goat milk. As a non-commercial farmstead cheese maker I often use frozen milk for Chevre and Feta. There are plenty of professional Artisan cheese makers working with frozen goat milk too.

    Here are some pics of Chevre I made this month with frozen goat milk :)

    Seasoned Chevre rolled in cracked pepper,
    [​IMG]

    Plain Chevre rolled in Herbs De Provence,
    [​IMG]

    Chevre mixed with assorted dried fruit rolled in pecans,
    [​IMG]

    Christy
     
  13. woodsman

    woodsman Well-Known Member

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    You could try adding calcium chloride:

    http://homesteadersupply.com/store/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=113
     
  14. LizD

    LizD Well-Known Member

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    Well Chevre isn't exactly aged and I have found in the past that making fresh cheese, depending on the time of lactation, frozen milk might work but for hard cheese the curd doesn't set properly. Just my observations but Woodsman is right it may have worked had I added calcium chloride to restabilize the milk; different cheesemakers have different observations. Liz
     
  15. cmharris6002

    cmharris6002 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Some people have problems with frozen milk while others don’t. Barring the auto defrost freezer fault other aspects affect the ability of goat milk to go through the process of being frozen, thawed and turned to cheese without problems. These include the breed of goat, her lines within that breed, feed and milk handling as well as the stage of lactation.

    For instance I have Nubians so that could make a big difference in why my milk handles these procedures.

    If you feed an ample amount of Alfalfa that will bring up the calcium content of the milk allowing for a consistently firm curd without ever needing to add calcium chloride.

    Christy
     
  16. whodunit

    whodunit Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I froze any extra goat milk we had. Thought we had about 15 gallons, turned out to be 20.

    Anyway it thaws perfectly and we used it for drinking and cooking.

    Didnt turn any into yogurt or cheese.
     
  17. Jillis

    Jillis Well-Known Member

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    Vicki has Nubians also. I have noticed that some of my thawed milk separates and some doesn't. Maybe the milk that doesn't is from my Nubians?
     
  18. catdance62

    catdance62 Well-Known Member

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    Well, I had some luck with making chevre. It wasnt as good as fresh and it didn't make as much, but I was pleased with my success. I appreciate all the input and I am going to try diffferent things that y'all suggested. I just really want to make the good yogurt that i made in the summer! However, kidding season is almost here....yeah!
    Thanks again!
    S