Used Pickup Info. Needed-Fuel Injection?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by tim1253, Jan 18, 2004.

  1. tim1253

    tim1253 Well-Known Member

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    Oct 4, 2002
    Location:
    East TN
    I am going to get an old pickup to use for farm stuff but want to get fuel injection instead of carbureator. Can anyone tell me when fuel injection started? Did all of the major manufacturers (Dodge, Chevy, Ford) begin fuel injection at the same time? I'm going to be looking for a very basic 6cyl., standard shift full size pickup.

    Tim
    Knoxville, TN
     
  2. len

    len Well-Known Member

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    Dec 24, 2003
    Location:
    central Ontario
    I think it was 1987 for the Ford F150, 4.9 litre inline six.
    hydraulic clutch master/slave assembly is a bit expensive to replace but otherwise I'm happy with my '87.
    good luck in your search,
     

  3. For most domestic manufactures 1987 was the year fuel injection was added to most cars/trucks. There were a few holdouts like the old style AMC Grand Cherokee/Wagoner which continued to use carbs till 1989. I think you can still get a carb on some sports cars like the Corvette (as a special order). I guess some people like to twiddle with them.
    Older Fords with the big six are excellent trucks (either carbureted or fuel injected). They are tough to find in good condition (snow belt areas) and most people wanted the larger V8 motor. I think Ford did away with the big six in 1996 due to poor fuel mileage and emission requirements. Before you buy, check the emission requirements in your state. You will have an easier time getting a fuel-injected truck through emissions than a carbureted truck. Good Luck
     
  4. If you are going to use it on farm property why may I ask do you want fuel injection? I know carbs can be annoying in certain conditions and if not maintained properly, B..UUU...TT fuel injection is far more complicated and costly to repair. Even a modest mechanic can rebuild a carb with a good manual to follow and simple tools. A carb can be forced to work and rigged with "out of the box" thinking in an emergency.
    Multi port fuel injection with its fuel rails, stick pumps, tank pumps and added sensors and the dreaded ECM. I love it when it works and that is all I can say about that!
    One option is to look for that beauty that appeared between carbs and multi-port, the throttle body injector. (note: you can also retro-fit any engine that was carbed to accept throttle body. Throttle body is not as exspensive to repair as multi-port injection and will provide you with easy starting and smooth idling. There are no overly complicated parts(granted you will have an electric fuel pump and ecm).
    If you are not going to inspect this truck then remove all those silly pollution control devices they were putting on engines in the 80's
    All makes during that time were like giant vaccum cleaners. Hoses all over the damn place and those canisters???
    So if you want to buy throttle body then look to the latter half of the 80's.
    Looking at a six cylinder huh?? I would say both the Ford and Dodge straight sixes are good solid engines in trucks (individuals may have had problems but overall they are a good choice and even though I don't like Ford, I would say theirs would be my pick over the Dodge)
    Chevy used to make one hell of a straight six for marine use but I am not familiar with any automotive application.
     
  5. Oh one more thing if this truck will be on the road some of the time and therefor need to be inspected check your state reg's Where I live pre-80's trucks fall into "classic" category and are not subject to modern emissions reg's. I know holley was (and would assume edlebrock aswell)
    making a carb without all that damn vaccum crap that was designed for emissions. Now this would mean it is not a performance minded carb but this is a farm truck.
     
  6. tim1253

    tim1253 Well-Known Member

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    Oct 4, 2002
    Location:
    East TN
    Thanks for the great input and advice. I can always count of this group! My uncle, who retired from the Dodge truck plant in Southfield, MI has convinced me that the fuel injection system was the single greatest invention in auto. history. I guess he's brainwashed me. Anyone have an idea when the craziness of pollution stuff got worked through? From what you all have said I guess I'll look for a 1987/1988 Ford or Dodge...especially with an inline six cyl.
     
  7. One of the main reasons auto manufactures switch from carburetors to fuel injection was emissions so the cut off year for smog stuff is still 1987. The big three has done an excellent job at cleaning up most smog equipment from modern vehicles. Cost was the removal of many good pushrod motors including the big six, the Chevy 350 and the Ford 460. The new engines are supposed to be more fuel-efficient and since they were designed for fuel injection, more emissions friendly.
    For the average consumer, auto fuel injection is probably the greatest invention since indoor plumbing. Carburetors and breaker point ignitions are venerable technology but need almost constant adjustment to perform at maximum efficiency. Fuel injection with an ECM solves all adjustment problems, is not affected by weather and allows the engine to utilize fuel more efficiently (more power with less emissions). My ski boat still runs a Ford 351PCM, a Holley 4 barrel with points. Got nothing for emissions cuz it’s a boat. It starts better than any of my fuel injected vehicles and goes like the proverbial bat out of hell. You just touch the key and it is running and you drop the throttle and it will literally vault out of the water. Fuel consumption is not something I talk about with the wife. Good Luck on your purchase.