Upright freezer suggestions

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Beeman, Oct 23, 2005.

  1. Beeman

    Beeman Well-Known Member

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    It's time to buy an upright freezer, anyone have any suggestions on brand or energy efficiency?
     
  2. OD

    OD Well-Known Member

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    I've had good luck with Whirlpool appliances, & have 2 Whirlpool freezers, both manual defrost. I recently needed another one, & bought a Frigidaire, because it was on sale. It seems to be good, too.
    My advice is to get the biggest one that you have room for & can afford.
     

  3. ET1 SS

    ET1 SS zone 5 - riverfrontage Supporter

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    Our plan is to have a 3 foot tall X 2 foot wide glass-door in the kitchen that opens onto a big frig, and another one that opens onto a big freezer. both frig and freezer will be in the garage. they will big 8 foot by 10 foot walk-in rooms. This way we can butcher and cut meat in the garage and hang it in the chill-box or freezer right there. Likewise with cleaning produce.

    Like those insulated glass doors you see in convenience stores.

    Look in and see what is there without opening either door.
     
  4. SpringCreek

    SpringCreek Active Member

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  5. JAK

    JAK Well-Known Member

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    I always wanted to make my own built in fridge and freezer from parts of an old fridge and freezer. With added insulation and putting the heat sink in a cool spot cooled by cold water on the way to the hot water heater you could make it as larger and way more efficient. The glass doors is a nice idea. You could have a heavier insulated door that slides in over that when your out of the kitchen.
     
  6. ET1 SS

    ET1 SS zone 5 - riverfrontage Supporter

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    LOL

    Putting the HOT coils into a tank of cold water was exactly my thought.

    Try this idea!

    I have to run 300 foot of ditch to put electrical power cables into (to run from the power pole near the street and out to the house). AND I have to run a second 300 foot ditch from the house (septic tank output) to the leech-field. Now while I have these ditches open, if I dropped in copper tubing maybe a few hudred feet of it into one of these ditches, and circulated water through this copper tubing and into a holding tank in the basement. It should keep that water at 50 degrees year around. Depending on how close to the frost-line the ditch is, it might even get down to mid-30s in the winter.

    A tank of cold water would be good for boosting the effieciency of any refrigerant compressor. Or if I ran this chillled water through a radiator with a fan, and built a drip pan underneath it; the radiator would work as a dehumidifier. But get this, an electric dehumidifier is running a 'refrigerant compressor' and thus is very costly to run. But my 'chilled-water-loop' dehumidifier would only need a small pump and it's fan; so it should run for a fraction of the cost.
     
  7. chas

    chas Well-Known Member

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    We had one upright and couldn't stack much in it because the piles of food kept tumbling out finally breaking the door threshold at the bottom.
    A chest type you can root around in and things dont fall out on your toe!
    But things do get lost in there :shrug:
    Cold air is heavier and a chest freezer will not lose as much cold .On the other hand it takes longer to find things near the bottom!!!!Six of one half a dozen of the other :rolleyes:
    Chas