unpleasant task of castrating goats

Discussion in 'Goats' started by sonya123, May 5, 2017.

  1. sonya123

    sonya123 Well-Known Member

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    Ok, so now we have 5 very cute male goat kids and are not quite sure what to do. I would like to keep at least one of them as another herd billy. So that leaves 4 to either castrate or not. We plan on selling them either way. Is it easier to sell an intact goat or a castrated one? Which is more profitable?

    Castrating the goat boys: what is the most humane way of doing this? The easiest? I don't really want to take them to the vet and pay $100 or more like you would for a dog. That would make this not very profitable. But I also don't want to hurt them too much either. What age should they be castrated?

    Thanks for any thoughts on this
     
  2. Hiro

    Hiro Well-Known Member

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    Sell them. You'll get more money in this area of the world selling them as kids than goats. What part of VA are you in?
     

  3. mzgarden

    mzgarden Well-Known Member

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    We band our bucklings. It's a simple procedure and other than a bout 5 minutes of hopping around, they don't exhibit any signs of distress or pain. Our experience has been they don't cry, yell when they're banded and they don't kick or scratch at the area. When to band can be a bit of a controversial discussion so I'll just share what we do. We band our bucklings at about 5 weeks. We spray the banded area with iodine daily for about a week to make sure we avoid any skin irritation. We do a quick check on the area periodically, just to make sure nothing bad is going on, but we've never had any issues. Their 'package' typically falls off about 3-4 weeks later.
     
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  4. barnbilder

    barnbilder Well-Known Member

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    If they are large sized breeds and you keep them until they are 75, 80 pounds you can get maybe $2.40 a pound in the fall. Hit the right time and you are looking at maybe $3 a pound or more. They will put more pounds on as wethers after a certain point, but price per pound will make little difference if they are cut or not. Management wise, they will do much better as wethers. Band or burdizzo works better than cutting for goats.
     
  5. popscott

    popscott Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Banding is easiest for me... get the tool and fresh bands... helper rares them back and holds all feet...put the tool over the junk and feel to make sure there is a testicle in each side before slipping on...Banding is not totally painless from what I've seen and done (plenty)... I put mine in a separate pen and they will lay down for a few hours... a little sweet feed...Ready to go after that. Wethers and older nannies are all I keep now...
     
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  6. ridgerunner1965

    ridgerunner1965 Well-Known Member

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    idk bout goats but calves always need a tetnus (spelling?) shot when banded.
     
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  7. Caprice Acres

    Caprice Acres AKA "mygoat" Staff Member Supporter

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    I've banded as young as a few days and till as old as the testes still fit through the band. I find that kids with a bit of age to them about 7-8 weeks seem less painful. Young animals don't seem to get the circulation cut off completely and pain is extended for them, as clearly exhibited by laying down, hollering, and not eating as well. I usually expect a bit of pain and not eating *as well* for 24hrs or so, no matter what. Older kids just seem to tolerate it better. I don't spray anything on the site unless I see the resultant small wound healing and it looks like it could use some gentle 1% iodine. Young kids from a herd with good dam vaccination (CDT 4 weeks pre-kidding) and colostrum management SHOULD have protection against tetanus through passive immunity until approximately 8 ish weeks - the exact time frame is variable but that's why we booster. ;) You can start vaccinating younger if you're not sure about the vaccination history of the dams, or your colostrum program. You can even give tetanus antitoxin at time of castration and get immediate protection to some degree.

    Many believe that waiting to castrate may decrease the risk of urinary stones lodging in a urethra, as the urethra develops differently in intact males vs wethers castrated young. However, one of the studies that actually looked at this saw no difference in urethral diameter until 6 months, and the improvement in diameter was marginal if I remember correctly. There are a whole SLEW of reasons not to house and raise out bucks until 6 months of age, main one being the stink and the lowered meat cost as these animals begin to urinate on themselves and stink, those processing the animals don't want to deal with that kind of meat contamination that is inevitable during butchering. It lowers the value of the animals as meat animals at least.

    I always suggest banding before the bucklings become sexually active. This can be as early as 10 weeks. I generally suggest banding and vaccination at around 8 weeks now, which is generally before they're active enough to start breeding their sisters in the herd, or their dams.

    The vast majority of bucks born are not breeding quality and that is OK. Pick your best, from your best dams and sires, to be your junior herdsire. If you can't choose or are choosing for some reason like flashy color - band 'em all. ;) There are likely better bucks to be had from other herds that would be more beneficial than keeping them.
     
    Last edited: May 7, 2017
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  8. Jlynnp

    Jlynnp Well-Known Member

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    My vet does it for $10 a goat. We take them in at 8 weeks.
     
  9. sonya123

    sonya123 Well-Known Member

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    I bought the tool to put the bands on...asked around and everyone but 1 person told us to band them. The one that doesn't do this takes his goats to the vet to do it (which is expensive)
     
  10. thekibblegoddes

    thekibblegoddes Well-Known Member

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    This year i messed up a banding and am dreading having to re-do it. Something slipped up above the band and started swelling and he got a little infection. He's getting antibiotics and is being rebanded tomorrow to take care of the junk i missed the first time. I feel bad for him but it needs doing. (and he loves the handful of grain after his shots)
     
  11. wmk0002

    wmk0002 Well-Known Member

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    I was told by a cattle farmer that banding an animal is the same thing as creating an open wound and inviting in an infection. I think the reasoning was that the testicles loose their blood supply and the tissue dies and begins growing bacteria before the pathway back up to the body has healed.
     
  12. collegeboundgal

    collegeboundgal -Melissa

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    Well, when I band, the tissue dries up and mummifies before it falls off... No rotting or bacteria growth.
     
  13. Caprice Acres

    Caprice Acres AKA "mygoat" Staff Member Supporter

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    Yes, placing a band can lead to an anaerobic environment for tetanus. A proper colostrum feeding program and vaccination program will prevent the overwhelming majority of problems with tetanus however, as the vaccine is highly safe and effective.

    I have seen few other problems with infections in the area, but it can happen. When it does happen, a quick spritz of the area with fly prevention wound dressing or iodine solves the problem.
     
  14. Bob Johnsun

    Bob Johnsun Well-Known Member

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    HMmmm cant you just hold down and do them the same way you do a pig or dog ??? Put bul-knote afterwards ?
     
  15. moonspinner

    moonspinner Well-Known Member

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    There is a definite overgrowth of bucks (I've especially seen this in the burgeoning nigerian population) who have no business being herdsires. Since a buck can have a huge affect on the genepool, a responsible breeder will only put up for sale worthy prospects. It is easier to sell wethers as the majority of goaters simply want pets and of course the price is lower than intact animals.
    As for neutering, I too band. It is cheap and quick and yes, while you may have youngsters who will cry and lie down for awhile (most of mine who do this are really uncomfortable for about two hours) most recover the next day. I do this procedure at night so they go right off to sleep.
    In my 15 years of banding I've only had serious infections a couple of times and even then a shot of Pen clears it up. I make sure to coat both the bander and doughnut, along with the the area with antiseptic/iodine. I do this at 7 weeks to monitor kids a week or more before they go off to their new homes.
     
  16. OwlHillFarm

    OwlHillFarm Well-Known Member

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    I am taking a calculated risk this year and NOT castrating any of my boys. The local market is keen on young bucklings (less than 6 months) for ethnic dishes. Since I have the space to separate my bucklings, I'm giving it a shot. I have always banded in the past, usually around 10 weeks which is later than most but I've never (knock wood) had an issue with urinary tract problems in any of them. Also, Hi! I missed you guys!
     
  17. Rectifier

    Rectifier Well-Known Member

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    Going to try these this year for delayed castration. Side crusher aka Ritchey Nippers. Maybe this weekend even! They are a modification of the burdizzo concept for small ruminants, no entry points for tetanus. I hate banding older animals and try to band within the first week.