Unexperienced Shearer

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Unregistered-1427815803, May 19, 2004.

  1. Ugh, I did login! This is JAS, the system won't keep me logged in.

    My question:
    We have one sheep (Jacobs), three llamas and a few fiber goats. We do all our shearing ourselves. Not sure if it is done correctly but the animals feel better. We don't try to clean the animals before shearing, don't think we could. My question is do I dare try to sell this fiber? Is there a website that teaches the do's and don'ts of homestead shearing? I have been spinning some of it myself (teaching myself) but I don't have time to work all of it and hate to waste it. I don't know the spinning business and would hate to offend anyone.

    Thanks.

    JAS
     
  2. JAS

    JAS Well-Known Member

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    Me again, I think I fixed the login problem. Just testing it.
     

  3. limhyl

    limhyl Well-Known Member

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    See if there is a spinning and weaving guild in your area. They could advise you on the quality of the fiber you raise and if it has been shorn to allow for proper spinning. Good luck!
     
  4. Sarah J

    Sarah J Well-Known Member

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    Check over on the sheep forum to see if anyone has any suggestions for you. I *watched* my one ewe being sheared for the first time on my place last January...I'll be attempting it myself in another month or so...It sure is different from grooming a dog!!! :haha:

    -Sarah
     
  5. JAS

    JAS Well-Known Member

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    My hubby and I both worked on our sheep. I don't know if he had ever been sheared before. I have the upmost respect for professional shearers. It took both of us, using old fashion shears, about 1 1/2 hours. The sheep is about three years old and fairly large. One of us would hold him on his rump and the other cut. Our backs were hurting that night!

    We still need to do our llamas. Last year we used scissors. It took awhile but this year we hope the shears will make it go faster and cleaner. I even used them on my American Water Spaniel--didn't turn out too bad.

    My biggest concerns are: how fussy are spinners with the quality of the cut and can I sell a dirty raw fleece or do I need to work with it before selling? I have taken the dirtiest fiber and worked until I could spin it (all by hand). It was a lot of work though--thus the lack of time issue. There is a fiber guild here but I haven't been able to join due to the time it is held and having small childern and no one to watch them (for free :) ).
     
  6. cowgirlone

    cowgirlone Well-Known Member

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    Jas I sheer my own and also spin it.
    The longer the wool, the easier it is to spin, I guess I mean dont' leave any short cut pieces in the wool. After sheering, lay the fleece out and remove any veggy matter and tags. It would still be considered as raw wool. Mainly get the larger pieces of straw, etc. and the tags off and the spinner can clean it the rest of the way. It won't bring as much money as cleaner wool, but it will save you a lot of time.

    Since I spin my own wool, I've found that I can just sheer my sheep in strips. (I use hand sheers) It is easier for me and it makes no difference when I card and spin it..
    Good luck to you! :)