Umbrella clotheslines

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Charleen, Aug 2, 2006.

  1. Charleen

    Charleen www.HarperHillFarm.com Supporter

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    One of our clothesline poles finally rotted and tipped over, so I'm without a clothesline until we can replace it. The set up is 2 poles about 20' apart with 4 lines stretched in between, so we need ample space for this. I've never been really happy with it's present location because it's on the north side of the house and usually in quite a bit of shadow from the house. But if I move it to where there's more sun, it's farther away from the door and that means hauling the baskets farther.

    So, I've thought about an umbrella clothesline. It won't take up as much lawn as my previous clothesline. And since it's smaller I'd be able to find space for it fairly close to the house but still in a somewhat sunny spot.

    Tell me pros & cons of umbrella clotheslines please. Thanks.
     
  2. crystalniche

    crystalniche Well-Known Member

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    My FIL has used one for many, many years. The pros are taking up much less space as another style of clothesline. You don't have to shovel as much snow in the winter if you will be using it then and you don't have to go as far to hang your clothes, it is all right there. Some swivel so you turn the whole thing, you don't move.

    The cons are the clothes on the inner lines dry slower because they are all together, closer than with a longer line. It helps when you learn where things dry the fastest so you can hang them that way. Also you have to be positive that it is in the ground very securely because of the weight when full of wet clothing. We had a neighbor who had one that began listing then one day it fell over with a full load of freshly washed laundry on it. You could hear her yelling all over the neighborhood!

    Overall I like them. They are great for the small places, if I had a big family I would have one of each kind of clotheslines~the umbrella type for the small things and the regular kind for larger, heavier things.

    LOL At some of those big McMansions they have their laundry out over the shrubbery to dry! Also use a wooden rack in the yard to dry clothes as well. Maybe no clotheslines allowed in the neighborhood? I'm not sure on that, just know what I've seen.
     

  3. cowgirlracer

    cowgirlracer Well-Known Member

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    I have had one for years and love using it for all the above mentioned reasons. We have always set our in concrete and never had any trouble with it listing, however Wyoming is subject to some very high winds, and when you get that many "sails" all bunched together it will blow over - giving the same results as listing does; clean clothes piled up on the ground and one very angry laudress! If you're not subject to high winds I would highly recommend one.

    Anne
    Cowgirlracer
    :hobbyhors
     
  4. nodak3

    nodak3 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    They can work well, but I have to say get one where the arms go up, so the inner lines are a little lower than the outer ones. Easier to use! Personally, I decided to go with pulley lines. They go from the back porch to the garage, up and over the back yard so high we can still enjoy the yard.
     
  5. Mutti

    Mutti Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Only con I found with the umbrella clothesline thing is hanging sheets....and finding a treeless location so the birds don't do their thing on my laundry. I want to get the pulley thing they sell in Lehmans so can just unhook from the far tree when I'm not doing laundry. DEE
     
  6. nduetime

    nduetime I am a Christian American Supporter

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    Had one given to me, thought I would love it but all the lines so close together were a pain. It just never felt right to me. My DH attached a tarp to it making a canopy cover to give the goats shade. It now sits on the goat hill and they fight over that particular shady spot. All those metal poles, brackets or whatever are really handy to attach the tarp to, it has gone through a couple of storms now and is doing just fine.
     
  7. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I've used a version of the umbrella for years. The one I have now isn't the "four-sided" type; it's rectangular.

    We cemented a pipe in the ground, so I can remove the pole to mow or when we're having company or we're doing a project that needs more space.

    A few years ago, the pole rusted at the base, and broke off. I was all set to go get another unit, but DH said, "Wait -- try this!" He took the broken piece out of the pipe, set the pole in the ground, and VOILA! The line is now shorter, which is much nicer for 5'4" me! :)

    Pony!
     
  8. BaronsMom

    BaronsMom Well-Known Member

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    I have an umbrella clothes line. And, yes - the lines are too close together and it is a pain for sheets. It is set in concrete, doesn't take as much room and more socially acceptable than stringing all my clothes under the front porch (which I still do for blankets/large sheets). I actually love hanging sheets on the front porch line I have - no birds poop on them, nice breeze - they hang straight - better than the umbrella.
     
  9. HeatherDriskill

    HeatherDriskill Well-Known Member

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    What is an "umbrella" clothesline? I don't think I've ever seen one. I have been wanting to put up a clothesline, just haven't gotten around to it. I think I can find some scrap poles on the property.
     
  10. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Here's one:

    [​IMG]
     
  11. HeatherDriskill

    HeatherDriskill Well-Known Member

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    aha! thanks! You always answer my questions, Pony. You're my mentor.
     
  12. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You're welcome! :)

    Your mentor? Gee! I'm honored! A little embarrassed, but... ;)

    Pony!
     
  13. Peacock

    Peacock writing some wrongs Supporter

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    I use mine all the time. Love it. I don't find it's a pain for sheets; I just pin one side to one row and the other side to the next. If I'm in a hurry to get stuff dried, I hang them on every other row to leave space for air circulation.

    One big "pro" to these is that I can hang my underwear in the middle and it gets hidden by everything on outer lines.
     
  14. Sumer

    Sumer Well-Known Member

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    I love mine. The only advantage that nobody said yet that I can see is that when I am done I leave the clothespins on the line. I clip them back on the line so the big hole on the pin is used. That way the pins can slide out of the way the next time I put up clothes. There is always a clothes pin within reach somewheres on some line.
    Oh ya, another one is that you have a smaller area to watch out for chewing up those dropped ones when your mowing the lawn.

    Sumer
     
  15. Peacock

    Peacock writing some wrongs Supporter

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    If you leave your clothespins on the line, don't they get ruined by the sun and rain? I've left a couple on the line accidentally and within a couple weeks they turned all gray and brittle. I keep my clothespins in a plastic shoebox and just tote it in and out with the laundry basket.
     
  16. TnMtngirl

    TnMtngirl Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have used an umbrella clothesline for over 20 years and couldnt do without it
    Edayna clothespins that turn dark can be cleaned by throwing then in a bucket of mild bleach water.I let mine sit for a few minuites then rinse and lay in the sun to dry..have used the same ones for many years doing this.I do gather them after the clothes dry.My clothes pin bag is on one of those wooden hangers,just handy hanging there on the line.
     
  17. DenverGirlie

    DenverGirlie Well-Known Member

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    My clothespins live on the line and have done so for the past three years. The only problem I've had is occasionally a spider will come along and spin a small web within the pin it'self on the top.
     
  18. NJ Rich

    NJ Rich NJ Rich

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    Mrs, NJ Rich wants an "umbrella type" collapsible clothes line. She wants the one where the inner lines are lower than the outer ones. The ones I find are cheaply made and look like a waste of money. Can anyone recommend a good brand and where it can be bought. I also want to get some good spring type clothes pins. Charleen probably needs the same info. Any help will be appreciated. Thanks NJ Rich
     
  19. tweety

    tweety Tweety

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    I've used one for many years, long enough to have to replace the lines. I hang clothes on every other line and put the short things on the inside. Maybe the next time I have to restring it I'll only put lines in every other hole. Since it was bought many years ago I can't help NJ Rich with a current source, but I do buy my spring clothes pins in the hardware store.
    I store my clothespole in the garage when the snow falls and I start hanging the clothes in the basement.
    I know of someone who wanted to hang her clothes out in her fancy subdivision that forbids outdoor clotheslines, so she put up a "drying yard" with a fence around it so the neighbors wouldn't be horrified to see her underwear blowing in the breeze.
    Where there's a will, there's a way!
     
  20. cowgirlracer

    cowgirlracer Well-Known Member

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    One big "pro" to these is that I can hang my underwear in the middle and it gets hidden by everything on outer lines. -- edayna

    I thought I was the only one who did that. Our back yard is very exposed and open for others to look in - I cannot stand the thought of my undies hanging out there for everyone else to see :eek: !!!!

    Anne
    Cowgirlracer
    :hobbyhors