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That doesn't sound like a lack of talent, it sounds more like a lack of willingness of employers to: a)attract talent or b)train their own talent. Employers might just have to step up their game a little.
Or we could take down Trumps wall and let the highly skilled workers come and fill those jobs.
 

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Sadly, colleges are now having to teach remedial courses that should have been mastered in HS
Hey, they may suck at math but at least they can relate to it on a cultural level. There's someone here who will tell you that's important.
 

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I would argue that U.S. colleges are not turning out skilled technology workers. Do kids get a degree in Computer Technology? Yes. Are the technologies taught in our higher education system current with demands and trends in the market place? No! A report from the White House predicted that 1.4 million computer science-related jobs available—and only about 400,000 computer science graduates who have the skills necessary to fill them. The most popular degree to get in the U.S. is n Business or Management. EVERYONE of them believes with their little 4 year degree, they would be running the company they are interviewing with not starting at the ground level and working their way up. Computer science degrees rank far lower popularity. I find that surprising since all I see is kids with their faces stuck in their technology (phones) all of the time. But getting a degree which requires Math and Science means work. Our youth isn't cut out for work.
 

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Saying that though my DH has a degree in Computer Engineering. The problem is he spends most of his days in meetings. He was just laminating to me today how he misses coding things. The problem is his company does not want him coding because it is cheaper to have people in India do all the coding and him managing them. In an all staff meeting it was mentioned by an employee that maybe they should try to hire more here in the US ...nope basically too expensive. BTW a lot of the people on his team are here on temp Visa or they have green cards.

They will even fly the person over from India to be trained here for several months all expense paid. Knowing that most of people from India usually only stay in a position for about two years before they move on and up.(Before Covid)
 

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Voice of Reason
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College can easily be done in 2 1/2 years. The universities won't set it up that way because if they can keep students there for 4 or 5 years they make more money.
That could be true for some majors, but in physical science and engineering it can't happen. Heck, it takes 2 years just to get the math they'll need.

Requirements could be trimmed somewhat. It seemed to me that I was taking a lot of english, history, and life science courses that were difficult to justify for a chemistry degree. Interestingly, the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes went to college to get the knowledge be needed, but didn't pursue a degree. He left when he learned what he needed to know. Maybe he was ahead of his time.
 

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Voice of Reason
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My training company was able to give college credit for Novell certified network engineer (CNE) courses.
Oh jeesh, Novell NetWare was awful! Before Linux I had to fool with it. I'll never understand why they didn't fashion Novell to UNIX, as Linux did. They wanted to create their own convoluted proprietary operating system, and they succeeded. They commanded the PC server market for about 10 years, but by the mid 1990s Novell NetWare was being abandoned in favor of Linux. I say good riddance! I haven't seen a NetWare server for at least 25 years.

Networking protocols stayed pretty much the same as Novell with Linux and Windows, but that wasn't Novell's anyway.
 

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Oh jeesh, Novell NetWare was awful! Before Linux I had to fool with it. I'll never understand why they didn't fashion Novell to UNIX, as Linux did. They wanted to create their own convoluted proprietary operating system, and they succeeded. They commanded the PC server market for about 10 years, but by the mid 1990s Novell NetWare was being abandoned in favor of Linux. I say good riddance! I haven't seen a NetWare server for at least 25 years.

Networking protocols stayed pretty much the same as Novell with Linux and Windows, but that wasn't Novell's anyway.
It wasn't Unix/Linux that did Novell in. Microsoft developed Windows Server that worked like Windows 95 minimizing the learning curve for someone to manage a Microsoft network. They priced it to destroy Novell like Microsoft had done to many companies before.

Eric Schmidt was President of Novell at the time this happened. Novell had ported the server to Linux, but it was too late to save the company. They were offering Linux both as a desktop and as a server. Schmidt did learn his lesson well because he constantly put the screw to Microsft when he was CEO of Google.
 

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Interesting on the stem fields and lack of success. We can blame many for the failures of others but I find my experience with children is the parents are responsible for lighting and maintaining stem interest in the child.
3 kids, 2 girls, 1 boy. Oldest is 32. All are stem field graduates, well mostly. Oldest daughter graduated Michigan State University with doctor of osteopathic medicine. Starts internal med residency in July.
Son, materials engineer, just started new job in the research and development department with adhesives. Youngest daughter starts in August her registered nurse program, got in on a honors pass. She is great at math, don’t let anyone say girls can’t do science. Every single one of them credit me with that interest in stem. I provided tools, reference material, and started many discussion on a subject. They all agree that without that interest that I put forward in stem while they were young made the difference. Too many times they’re asked about some obscure item and realize the knowledgeable in the matter. All the time spent on aquariums running water tests taught verify quality, math skills. It was the same in the garage whether we were doing woodworking or cars. The parents spark the interest and feeds those desires. Education should polish the foundation that the parents built. It starts with me with my children. If their friends want to come along all the better. Microscopes, telescopes, electronics bench, mechanical assemblies, fabrication it didn’t matter. They all learned and they realized how many subjects crossed over. And I got a lot of great times working and teaching them about it. I believe the lessons I gave on education and on the subject matters will continue through generations. You have kids, you start their interests. If benign neglect is your effort in the beginning. Then you reap what you sow. Want better, do better!
 

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That could be true for some majors, but in physical science and engineering it can't happen. Heck, it takes 2 years just to get the math they'll need.

Requirements could be trimmed somewhat. It seemed to me that I was taking a lot of english, history, and life science courses that were difficult to justify for a chemistry degree. Interestingly, the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes went to college to get the knowledge be needed, but didn't pursue a degree. He left when he learned what he needed to know. Maybe he was ahead of his time.
Most computer jobs don't require engineering or math. Those that do require varying degrees of it. One thing that could be done, and is the best way to teach, is to integrate all the courses into one program. For example, the students are given a problem to solve. To solve the problem they have to learn certain math, engineering, and programming skills to solve it.
 

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Voice of Reason
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It wasn't Unix/Linux that did Novell in. Microsoft developed Windows Server that worked like Windows 95 minimizing the learning curve for someone to manage a Microsoft network. They priced it to destroy Novell like Microsoft had done to many companies before.
I tried a Windows server during the late 1990s (NT Server 4.0) but didn't find the stability I needed. As much as I hated to, I switched to Linux. The learning curve was much steeper than with Windows, but I had some familiarity with UNIX commands dating back to around 1980. But I was only a system user, not the console operator.

The problem with Windows servers is that they couldn't be installed without the graphical interface. That wasn't introduced until Windows Server 2008. By then a lot of users (myself included) were Linux operators with no desire to take a chance on a Windows server. Linux servers commonly use an application called Samba, which is fully compliant with sharing files to Windows users.

There has been a recent upheaval in the CentOS operating system, which has caused a major disruption in my life. CentOS will no longer be a stable RHEL clone. Many of the CentOS developers have jumped ship to join the Rocky Linux project, creating a product similar to what CentOS used to be. Hopefully life will return to normal in the next few months. There is a release candidate (a RHEL 8.4 clone) available for download, but I'll be waiting for the stable release. It shouldn't be more than a month or so.

 

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Voice of Reason
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Most computer jobs don't require engineering or math. Those that do require varying degrees of it. One thing that could be done, and is the best way to teach, is to integrate all the courses into one program. For example, the students are given a problem to solve. To solve the problem they have to learn certain math, engineering, and programming skills to solve it.
I just don't see how solving example problems is going to provide a deep understanding of physics
 

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SM Entrepreneuraholic
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I tried a Windows server during the late 1990s (NT Server 4.0) but didn't find the stability I needed. As much as I hated to, I switched to Linux. The learning curve was much steeper than with Windows, but I had some familiarity with UNIX commands dating back to around 1980. But I was only a system user, not the console operator.

The problem with Windows servers is that they couldn't be installed without the graphical interface. That wasn't introduced until Windows Server 2008. By then a lot of users (myself included) were Linux operators with no desire to take a chance on a Windows server. Linux servers commonly use an application called Samba, which is fully compliant with sharing files to Windows users.

There has been a recent upheaval in the CentOS operating system, which has caused a major disruption in my life. CentOS will no longer be a stable RHEL clone. Many of the CentOS developers have jumped ship to join the Rocky Linux project, creating a product similar to what CentOS used to be. Hopefully life will return to normal in the next few months. There is a release candidate (a RHEL 8.4 clone) available for download, but I'll be waiting for the stable release. It shouldn't be more than a month or so.

Netware was a much better server and easier to administer than Windows NT. It was when Microsft went to Windows 2000 server that it killed Netware. Netware had a directory service sitting on top of it that never lived up to its potential or it might have been able to fight Microsoft off.
 

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Another factor is that the standard US 12 year education and High School degree isn't worth a hoot anymore. Many four year college degrees don't turn out much better educated kids that high schools did 40 years ago.

In elementary, middle and high school you used to be forced to learn basic reading, writing, and arithmetic skills or you would not advance to the next grade. No kids get held back of flunked anymore, they just move them through the system. The end result is 18 year old kids that aren't much good to employers without a bunch more training.
 
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