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We need multiple smaller, regional processors using local produce to sell to local customers


 

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Economy of scale. Tyson and the other big producers can sell cheaper, and that's what most people seem to want.

I started going local for a lot of stuff but recently my local producers are overwhelmed and backlogged. "I'd like 100 mixed cuts" gets me "we can probably get that in about 6-8 weeks"
 

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Economy of scale. Tyson and the other big producers can sell cheaper, and that's what most people seem to want.

I started going local for a lot of stuff but recently my local producers are overwhelmed and backlogged. "I'd like 100 mixed cuts" gets me "we can probably get that in about 6-8 weeks"
I know. I understand economies of scale very well. I was in manufacturing for decades.

Concentration like we have today creates choke points and single points of failure.
 

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We seem to be getting even more of it for many products. I tinker with electronics, and it was a heavy blow when Radio Shack shut down. It took quite some time for alternate sources to become really viable, and even now they're all on Amazon.

I'll go for quality over price, if I can find the option, and that usually means small local businesses. It just seems to be harder to find those locals.
 

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We seem to be getting even more of it for many products. I tinker with electronics, and it was a heavy blow when Radio Shack shut down. It took quite some time for alternate sources to become really viable, and even now they're all on Amazon.

I'll go for quality over price, if I can find the option, and that usually means small local businesses. It just seems to be harder to find those locals.
Radio Shack was a loss.

I went to a place in So Cal one time that was like a Radio Shack on steroids. I think they have even closed now. I think it was called Fry. It was incredible.
 

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We seem to be getting even more of it for many products. I tinker with electronics, and it was a heavy blow when Radio Shack shut down. It took quite some time for alternate sources to become really viable, and even now they're all on Amazon.

I'll go for quality over price, if I can find the option, and that usually means small local businesses. It just seems to be harder to find those locals.
I’m with you. Radio Shack was a uniquely cool retailer... even well into the time where they strayed from their core and dedicated their square-footage to trying to be a budget version of Sharper Image.

I’ve had a Mouser and Tube Depot account for a long time, but I’d still go into RS for oddball parts I wanted to try right away. Of course, their oddball part selection got pretty sparse there near the end.

When the last one near me went out of business, I bought almost all of their traditional electronics department for less than $500. I ended up with two of their top-end digital soldering stations for less than $100. One is a backup in a box that I’ll probably never need, but it’s a hell of a good iron.
 

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Radio Shack was a loss.

I went to a place in So Cal one time that was like a Radio Shack on steroids. I think they have even closed now. I think it was called Fry. It was incredible.
Fry's is still around. I use Mouser and Digi-key a lot. In the San Fernando Valley in California, there's a place called All Electronics. They mail order too.
 
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We still have Fry’s in Austin. Love it, but avoid it because there are so many opportunities for impulse purchases.

Our local farmers market is incredible. Over 20 vendors now. You really don’t need to go to a grocery store anymore if you shop there.

 

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We seem to be getting even more of it for many products. I tinker with electronics, and it was a heavy blow when Radio Shack shut down. It took quite some time for alternate sources to become really viable, and even now they're all on Amazon.

I'll go for quality over price, if I can find the option, and that usually means small local businesses. It just seems to be harder to find those locals.
I have used Jameco Electronics as a catalog components and tool source since the mid 1980s and they are like a catalog version of the old local stick and brick hobbyist Radio Shacks and dungeon dark fix it shops that sold parts and parts warehouses and their prices aren't bad for this era.
 

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I wasn’t into electronics too much but I still miss the radio shack. Ours was always pretty small and barely hanging on, but then it hung on until there wasn’t the name any more, they sold stuff on their own for a year+ until they evolved into a Verizon store.

more local regional smaller meat packing would be better but it’s too expensive. There are 3 of those sized packing plants around here, they rotate grand new reopening to closing back to new owners and reopening every 2-3 years. Just can't compete, thry have tried regular, and kosher, and organic, and other specialty type and it just never works out.

Paul
 

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I started my first job about 1962 working in the meat market of a small grocery store. There was a chicken processor just over the river from us and when we needed chickens they would deliver them in what looked like USPS jeeps. The chickens were packed in the old type wood crates that you had to wire the lid down. Lots of ice. They would bring them into the market and put them right in the case. They were not packaged.
We had a Ziegler meat plant about 8 miles away that we got beef and pork from.
The meat was wrapped in white butcher paper as we sold it. There is an art to wrapping about 10 pounds of chitterlings in butcher paper.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I started my first job about 1962 working in the meat market of a small grocery store. There was a chicken processor just over the river from us and when we needed chickens they would deliver them in what looked like USPS jeeps. The chickens were packed in the old type wood crates that you had to wire the lid down. Lots of ice. They would bring them into the market and put them right in the case. They were not packaged.
We had a Ziegler meat plant about 8 miles away that we got beef and pork from.
The meat was wrapped in white butcher paper as we sold it. There is an art to wrapping about 10 pounds of chitterlings in butcher paper.
Does that exists now?
 

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I moved away close to 50 years ago, and I doubt the meat plants are. That was in Northport, Al on the banks of the Black Warrior River. Tuscaloosa was just over the river and U of A was less than 10 miles away. Most of the businesses are closed and more like an arts district.
The building on the left is where the grocery store was located. It has changed a lot. s
 

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Radio Shack was a loss.

I went to a place in So Cal one time that was like a Radio Shack on steroids. I think they have even closed now. I think it was called Fry. It was incredible.
I remember Fry's - that was quite a store! I loved being able to shop raw computer parts off the shelves. But for electronic components (diodes, resistors) the place to go in SoCal was Electronics Warehouse in Riverside.
I have used Jameco Electronics as a catalog components and tool source since the mid 1980s and they are like a catalog version of the old local stick and brick hobbyist Radio Shacks and dungeon dark fix it shops that sold parts and parts warehouses and their prices aren't bad for this era.
Thanks for the suggestion, I'll check them out!
 

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Radio Shack was a loss.

I went to a place in So Cal one time that was like a Radio Shack on steroids. I think they have even closed now. I think it was called Fry. It was incredible.
Yep, as everyone else said, Fry's. When my son was a teenager he used to beg me to take him there, teenage boy heaven ;)

Only the last time we were in there (just after the pandemic broke but before all the quarantine lock downs, I think) the store was practically empty. Like empty shelves everywhere. We asked what was going on but the store employees said they were waiting for shipments that never came. Couldn't find the computer fan we were hoping to pick up without having to wait for Amazon.

Haven't been back recently to see what it looks like now.
 

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Fry Electronics. We had them in AZ too.
Fry's is still around. I use Mouser and Digi-key a lot. In the San Fernando Valley in California, there's a place called All Electronics. They mail order too.
I’d been in a couple Frys over the years and wasn’t impressed... until the wife and I wandered into a real one in Manhattan. My Inner-Geek feel out, made a huge mess on the floor, and my wife almost never got me back to the rest of our trip.
 

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I’d been in a couple Frys over the years and wasn’t impressed... until the wife and I wandered into a real one in Manhattan. My Inner-Geek feel out, made a huge mess on the floor, and my wife almost never got me back to the rest of our trip.
MediaMarket in Germany. They're in some other countries as well. Think of a few electronic stores(800+...yes 800 stores!) under one roof. Yes, one roof!
One store could be 8000sqft(bigger than an average Frys) I have never ever seen anything like it anywhere. Everything electric. I could have easily spent a week there and still not seen 4 or 5 floors. I thought electronic stores in Japan and Korea were crazy, they're nothing compared to MediaMarket.
When my daughter D was about 3, i took her to the Fry's in Burbank. She absolutely refused to go in....it's theme was "aliens".
Doesn't bother her now!!:oops:
 
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