Typewriters gain fans amid burnout

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by Shrek, Jun 19, 2017.

  1. Shrek

    Shrek Singletree Moderator Staff Member

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    Although I use computers as evident from my online presence, coworkers and friends always found it strange that I chose to keep at least one typewriter available in my office at work or here in my home study.

    I actually have four. The manual carry case smith I used in school, an executive hammer strike, a Selectric II and a "modern" daisy wheel with memory feature.

    Although I may use the word processor on my PC and printer to compose a letter, I still use a typewriter to address envelopes as it is generally easier and faster to properly address them on a typewriter. I also prefer using a typewriter when typing reports or filling in carbon copy forms.

    I so dislike receiving PC word processor typed correspondences mailed to me in hand written addressed envelopes because the person sending the letter doesn't want to take the time to set their printer settings to address an envelope or don't know how.

    While reading my Sunday paper I read this article that the 20th century typewriter is gaining a fan base among the sector of society becoming burned out with the technological advancements.

    Although the article was in my local paper I did find the same article online with the Pueblo Chieftain AP source.

    http://www.chieftain.com/business/t...cle_16979f3e-7f94-543b-8611-663689453976.html

    "ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. -- Typewriter enthusiasts gather at an Albuquerque restaurant to experiment with vintage Smith Coronas. Fans in Boston kneel in a city square and type stories about their lives during a pro-immigration demonstration. A documentary on typewriters featuring Tom Hanks and musician John Mayer is set for release this summer..."

    Although over the past couple decades PCs and word programs have out paced the use of typewriters, I know many as myself who still keep one and I read that the Brother company still produces about 200,000 per year for industries and agencies that still use carbon copy forms and manufacture clear plastic daisy wheel models for use by prison inmates so they can type their legal appeals and such and the machines cannot be used to hide contraband.

    Ribbons and ribbon cartridges of course have become as expensive as ink cartridges, I still find a typed letter ,report, resume' or manuscript a bit more classier than a ink jet printed piece.

    So anyone else still keep their old typewriter to use for convenience , nostalgic inspiration , to avoid tech burnout or just to drop a note delivered by snail mail to a relative who doesn't do email or can't read your handwriting?
     
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  2. gilberte

    gilberte Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I do not miss typewriters, not one iota! Don't miss having to use carbon paper to make two copies and don't miss having to use White-Out to correct mistakes (okay maybe that's my fault) or having to start all over because the dang report I was writing looked like someone had painted it with white paint. Nope, don't miss typewriters at all:D
     
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  3. Wolf mom

    Wolf mom Well-Known Member

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    Recently gave my son the Royal portable typewriter his grandfather used in WW2. It's on display in his office.

    It will come in handy when the US suffers an EMP strike.

    reminder : find typewriter ribbons....
     
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  4. MO_cows

    MO_cows I calls em like I sees em

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    I learned to type on a manual typewriter. I used one on the job for several years, I typed up invoices every day which were multiple "NCR" copies so had to bang those keys to still make a good imprint on the bottom pages. I would like to own one, could see a few uses for it. Never have been a fan of inkjet printers, and the color laser is too expensive.
     
  5. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....? Supporter

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    I have one around here somewhere but never use it.
     
  6. emdeengee

    emdeengee Well-Known Member

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    I used typewriters for 25 years and they are awful. The accountant I first worked for would not allow a single mistake - we did not even have white-out in the office. Although I was fast and accurate there is no way that you go through life without a single mistake or spelling error.

    A word processor is a wonder of the modern world. Not only can you correct mistakes but actually change entire parts of a document not to mention the print size or font. We had many elderly clients who had trouble with their eyes and I used font size 20 or higher and bolded for them and they always commented on how they wished everyone would do the same.

    I have a very old manual portable typewriter that belonged to my Grandfather. I keep it for sentimental reasons but also in case we ever get hit by zombies and lose the electricity and I need to type out a menu for them.

    I actually like it when someone addresses an envelope in their handwriting. Particularly cursive as so many of the young do not have this skill at all. Printing is for children.
     
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  7. NRA_guy

    NRA_guy Well-Known Member

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    We have 2 that we just ended up with in a family estate division. One is manual the other is electric.

    Both are small, portable, SCM brand (I think). One has a hard case.

    We will be giving them away if we can find somebody local who wants them.
     
  8. HermitJohn

    HermitJohn Well-Known Member

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    I still have the Olivetti I used in college, but last time I thought of getting it out, found the belt was rotted. It would turn on but you couldnt type. I still have Mom's 1930s era Remington typewriter, but never cared that much for manual typewriters. Kinda doubt one can get new ribbon for either, but suppose if you can get any kind of typewriter ribbon, you could remove actual ribbon and put it over onto the old reels that fit the typewriter you have

    Yea as long as computer works, use that. Not having to use whiteout or retype something multiple times to get a mistake free copy is priceless.
     
  9. NRA_guy

    NRA_guy Well-Known Member

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    Fonts are easier to change on a computer, too. ;-)