Type of tree for wet areas

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by tjconner, Mar 2, 2005.

  1. tjconner

    tjconner New Member

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    What type of tree should I plant in wet areas. The levee on my pond leaks and I would like to plant some trees or shrubs in the area to suck up the seepage. Any ideas?? Can't fix the seepage without tearing out the whole levee and draining the pond
     
  2. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I live in Zone 7 and we are in the process of converting 34+ acres back to wetlands (this property is in a flood plain). Our Soil Conservation Service sent us this list of hardwoods to plant:

    Well Drained to Moderately Well Drained:

    Cherrybark Oak, Northern Red Oak, Sawtooth Oak, Southern Red Oak, White Oak, Black Cherry, Black Walnut, Chinese Chestnut, Dogwood, Hickory, Persimmon, Plum, Sassafras, Wild Crabapple, Basswood and Cottonwood.

    Moderately Well Drained to Some What Poorly Drained:

    Cherrybark Oak, Chinkapin Oak, Scarlet Oak, Shumard Oak, Water Oak, Willow Oak, Black Gum, Hackberry, Mulberry, Persimmon, Pecan, Green Ash, Sweet Gum, Sycamore, Yellow Poplar.

    Some What Poorly Drained to Very Poorly Drained:

    Nuttail Oak, Overcup Oak, Swamp Chestnut Oak, Swamp White Oak, Willow Oak, Bald Cypress, Green Ash, Persimmon.

    The natural stand of trees we have is in the bottom and poorly drained. In it are mostly Sycamores and Cypress. On higher ground were it drains somewhat better we have a lot of Elms, Oaks, Sweet Gums, Honey Locust, Persimmon, and Sassafras.
     

  3. BCR

    BCR Well-Known Member

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    Telling us your planting zone would help.

    If it is really wet and there is no danger with the roots causing problems, try willow.

    Otherwise, river birch grows fast, is deciduous, clumps and has pretty winter bark.
     
  4. Cindy in KY

    Cindy in KY Well-Known Member

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    Willows, Bamboo & Catails all suck up water. I've heard the Bamboo will spread out pretty far.
     
  5. BCR

    BCR Well-Known Member

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    WAIT! STOP! Before planting bamboo, search this site and you will find my horror story about my own folly in planting it. I wouldn't wish it on my enemy!

    If you must plant bamboo but it from a trusted source as 'clumping' however it can be expensive for a large area, as it doesn't spread as fast/far as the runner type.

    River birches, willows and many others will be for sale at the local Big Lots soon for about $13 a tree. I have had great success with their trees.
     
  6. mtman

    mtman Well-Known Member

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    i agree willow is about the best but watch planting to close to the house they are known to snap in high winds
     
  7. johnghagen

    johnghagen Well-Known Member

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    :) River birch and Bald Cypress,Cotton wood .Sycamore all work even in standing water
     
  8. jlxian

    jlxian Also known as Jean Supporter

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    We have Australian Willows planted in our wet areas. They grow very quickly.
     
  9. WisJim

    WisJim Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If it is a damp/wet area, willows will easily root from cuttings of branches. Just stick twigs in the ground, and a good percentage should grow. I usually do it in early spring, just as they are barelyl starting to bud out, before the leaves appear. Pieces a foot long work for me.

    Jim
     
  10. bergere

    bergere Just living Life

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    In the wet areas here, Cedar grows well. We have some rather old cedar trees on rather swampy ground.
     
  11. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    Zone 4 or lower probably best for these:
    White Spruce
    White Cedar
    Tamarack or European Larch
    Black Srpuce
    Willow
    Alder
    White Ash
     
  12. punkrockpilot

    punkrockpilot Well-Known Member

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    I agree with the bamboo warnings - If you plant bamboo make sure to plant the right kind.

    There were 2 kinds at my house when I moved on - one that has kept itself in check, looks great, does not spread, etc.

    The other was an established spreading nightmare from h#ll!!! - It took me months of weekends with a chainsaw to eleminate it.
     
  13. shorty'smom

    shorty'smom Well-Known Member

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    Do I understand you correctly? You want to plant trees on the pond dam?

    That's a bad idea according to the sources I have. We keep our pond dams clear of tree roots because the root grows through the dam and creates a channel that the water then begins to seep along through the dam. We've been told it can make the dam wash out sooner. We've had to hire a dozer to repair several ponds in the past few years.
     
  14. Oilpatch197

    Oilpatch197 Well-Known Member

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    Yea to the catails! they are also a emergency source of food! Very good plant!
     
  15. BCR

    BCR Well-Known Member

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    Depending on the size/depth of the pond, be careful with cattails as theyc an choke a smaller pond fairly quickly.