Type of house plan

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by pcdreams, Jun 6, 2006.

  1. pcdreams

    pcdreams Well-Known Member

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  2. mammabooh

    mammabooh Metal melter Supporter

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    I'd just call it a farmhouse.
     

  3. SkizzlePig

    SkizzlePig Well-Known Member

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    It looks to me as if it's an add-on house. Maybe they built the main house, then added to the back, then added to the back again. You may have to take this photo to an architectural designer and have them custom design a house around this exterior.
     
  4. tiogacounty

    tiogacounty Well-Known Member

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    That is a classic mid 1800s to depression era rural farm house. There are tens, perhaps hundreds of thousands of them here in rural Pa. The earlier ones were frequently squared log that was eventually sided with clapboard. Later they were stick framed or even plank framed. Plank framing is a type of construction that involves wide, rough sawn planks that are nailed up like a fence, with additional layers added to achieve two or three layer wall thickness. A lot of these houses started out log, then were cover with wooden clapboard, then asphault "brick" siding, then aluminum siding and now have a vinyl sided exterior. Many have so many additions it is hard to figure out what they originally looked like. The frequently started quite small and rectangular. I have done extensive renovations to one that was 20' deep by 25' wide. They almost always had a full length front porch and a full basement. the small one I did had two rooms down, a kitchen and a living room, and two bedrooms upstairs. They frequently had a one story room out the back that was the summer kitchen. You don't need much in the way of plans as they are just a very basic two story. A set of historically accurate plans would be of little value as that usually lacked modern features like closets or bathrooms. An untouched 1900 house from rural Pa. will have 4 or 5" white clapboard, very simple exterior detailing and single hung windows with two panes over two. The roof is black slate and the foundation is field stone. The front porch will have nice turned wooden columns without railings, One unusual feature it might have is that the front porch will be supported by four, or more stone walls that are perpendicular to the front basement wall. This means that the floor joists run parallel to the house and the floor boards are all the depth of the porch, usually 8'. Chimneys are central, so there will be a little stub of a brick chimney penetrating the peak. A common roof pitch was in the 7-8 range. The soffit was completely filled in with pine boards and the porch typically had a flat, beaded board ceiling, painted sky blue. They are so common in these parts, I think I could design and build one from memory. Good luck on your adventure.
     
  5. Gresford

    Gresford Well-Known Member

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    The Amish use timber frame construction to build their homes. The add-on that you see is typical in their community. When the children get married, they don't move out. Instead they just attach their new home to their parents home. It's the best form of social security available.

    You can find timber frame companies online owned and operated by Amish.
     
  6. pcdreams

    pcdreams Well-Known Member

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    Wow.. Sounds almost like our house. We have the ol single pane windows and beadboard ceiling on the porch.. This use to be a 4 square untill they added the kitchen/bath/back porch (which was enclosed later).. Ours was bult around 1896..
     
  7. blufford

    blufford Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I've seen some of these farm houses made into duplexes (double houses). Alot of Amish build and live in these style farmhouses in Delaware. I owned one that had a cement porch which was fine until I had to have it (the house) treated for termites.
     
  8. MartyPalange

    MartyPalange Member

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  9. pcdreams

    pcdreams Well-Known Member

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    luckily we live close to an amish community (well semour is only about 35 miles).. Hmm may have to look into this. Price a barn at the same time :)
     
  10. FolioMark

    FolioMark In Remembrance

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    Ohhh finally I can use my hard earned degree in Architectural History, class of 1977 University of Illinois. Officially speaking, this is called an I house. As Tioga says, they were built by the thousands all over the United States starting in the late 18th century after the Revolutionary War. They generally have a central stairhall with one room on either side and the same plan on the second floor.
    Yours has had two shed roofed additions with different slopes at the back which has created what is called a cat slide roof. A lot of these houses particularly in the south, started out as dogtrot houses, two rooms with an open breezeway, the dogtrot, which was used as an open air work/ living area. As the family got more prosperous the dog trot was enclosed as a stair hall and a second story was added. In some areas, there is no central hallway, just two rooms with the stairway sandwiched between them and each room has a door to the front porch. As to plans, you could easily draw one up for yourself on the back of an old letter. Any competent carpenter ought to be able to put one up without batting an eye. :)
     
  11. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Take another look at that old farmhouse. Notice that the roof comes right to the top of the windows. In the upstairs rooms, the ceiling will slope down to probably five feet, maybe six.

    Looking for plans, try a cape cod, which will give you an upstairs with probably two bedrooms and a bathroom. Or, a full two story, but build your kitchen out the back with a one story. That will give you the look of the two story with the attached one story. Having the kitchen as the bump out will also keep the kitchen from being a passway. I wouldn't use old plans because, as tioga county wrote, they would be outdated. You need heavy insulation, modern windows, modern electric and plumbing, closets, cupboards, and appliances. Halls should be over three feet wide, and stairs should be wide enough to get furniture up and down, or be able to install a chair lift, so 3 1/2 to 4 ft wide. Doorways should be a full three feet wide to accomadate wheelchairs and walkers, not to mention moving furniture.

    My in-laws house was a one story frame. When they could afford it, they added on the big two story part, and later enclosed a side porch and turned it into a kitchen. That's the way they did it here in the 1800's.
     
  12. pcdreams

    pcdreams Well-Known Member

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    this is interesting.. I've always been curious.. When people say they "add the second story later".. do you mean they physically remove the roof and put on another story.. or do they frame it all then just finish the upstairs as they can?

    The latter would seem more logical but :shrug:
     
  13. tiogacounty

    tiogacounty Well-Known Member

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    Well, this is partially true. Not all Amish build timber frame homes, in fact in Pa. most build new homes, additions and renovations no different than their neighbors do. Stick frame, fiberglas insulation, drywall and vinyl siding. I frequently drive past a major rehab that an Amish family is doing to a ranch house they bought. It is close to a tear down. They are turning a modest ranch into a huge two story farm house. With the exception of the lack of modern electrical work, nothing is different from what you would see anywhere including Tyvek, Pella windows and a boom truck loading the sheetrock into a second floor window. Amish and Mennonite folks are extremely practical and tend to build whatever fits their needs. If that need is best filled by a newly built stick framed house and a pole barn, that's fine. If it is filled by an existing home bought from an "english" family, that works too. In Lancaster county PA, it isn't unusual to find a home in an existing, in-town neighborhood occupied by an Amish family. the clues are that the electric meter is removed and a horse and buggy are in the driveway.
     
  14. FolioMark

    FolioMark In Remembrance

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    PCdream: Yes often when they wanted to expand a small one story house they would take off the roof and frame another story over the original one and build a new roof. It some ways its cheaper than adding on because you dont need to dig new basement space and lay new foundations. Of course your original foundation had to be substantial enough to support the added weight.
     
  15. wy_white_wolf

    wy_white_wolf Just howling at the moon

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    I think people are stretching to think that house has been added onto that much. Look at the windows. The first and second floor and the first shed on the back are all the same style. And the tops of the line up between the main body and the 1st shed. The only part that doesn't look original is the very back part of the shed. Where the window is different and the roof doglegs.

    By the second story windows going to the tops of the walls I would say this is a timber framed house. Would help to know the size of the main body as timber frames didn't span that far back then. If you Google for timber frames you can find may companies still building them with styles that resemble this house.
     
  16. DenverGirlie

    DenverGirlie Well-Known Member

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    Looks much like a salt box house
     
  17. Nature_Lover

    Nature_Lover Well-Known Member

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    It is what we called salt box in high school engineering and design class.
     
  18. vicker

    vicker Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, we call it a salt box too (the main part). As a whole its a maodified salt box. Our house is styled after that idea. We built the main part first and are living in it. Are adding a back room this fall, then a two story addition to the main part and a sun room.
     
  19. Freeholder

    Freeholder Well-Known Member

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    A saltbox house would have the back roof line all one roof line, instead of the break between the house (2-story) roof, and the shed (1-story) roof.

    Kathleen
     
  20. tiogacounty

    tiogacounty Well-Known Member

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    No, it's not a salt box. A salt box is a gable roof with one roof plane longer than the other. No, there is no reason to assume it's a timber frame, it could be anything from timber to log under that siding, but it is most likely stick framed. This style of basic venacular farmhouse really became popular after 1850 when sawmills were prevelent enough that most rural folks had access to affordable dimensional lumber. No, there is no reason to assume that anything but the structure located under the main roof and the front porch were there originally. Siding, window placement and windows are not reliable clues as to what is original. this building could easily be on it's third set of windows and fourth layer of siding. I built a two story addition to a home very similar to this. I took great care in matching all the exterior details exactly, wood clapboard, crown molding and drip caps on the window trims etc... there has never been a casual visitor to the home that even guessed that it had an addition, much less that it was ninety five years newer than the original. A good addition should be seamless, and a good siding job can hide a lot of sins. This house was probably built in at least three stages including a really poor addition to the rear addition. I'm no expert, but I have my lifetime quota filled when it comes to mouse turds, wasp nests and old newspapers I have found while repairing and renovating houses, many that looked a lot like this one.