TX: Field Trial for Animal ID Launched...whats your state doing?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians, Dec 11, 2004.

  1. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    Subject : Prem ID Program Ready in Texas; Field Trial for Animal ID Launched





    News Release
    Texas Animal Health Commission
    Box l2966 * Austin, Texas 78711 * (800) 550-8242 * FAX (512) 719-0719
    Bob Hillman, DVM * Executive Director
    For info, contact Carla Everett, information officer, at 1-800-550-8242, ext. 710,
    or ceverett@tahc.state.tx.us

    For immediate release---
    Premises Identification Program Ready;
    Field Trial for Animal Identification Also Launched

    Ranchers and other livestock facility owners from every facet of the Texas livestock and poultry industry can now sign up for a unique “premises identification number,” for their livestock facilities. The premises identification number will identify the location of livestock operations in the state. It is the first step in implementing a national system for quickly tracing livestock and poultry for disease investigations or during a disease outbreak or animal health emergency. The Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC) also is launching a year-long pilot project with a number of ranches, feedlots, livestock markets, slaughter plants and other facilities to test the durability and reliability of electronic ear tags, related equipment and databases for identifying and tracking individual animals.

    “The national premises and animal identification system has been under development for several years, with input and ideas from nearly 70 federal and state animal health agencies and livestock industry associations,” said Dr. Bob Hillman, a member of the Secretary’s Advisory Subcommittee on the National Animal Identification System. He serves as Texas’ state veterinarian and heads the TAHC, the state’s livestock and poultry health regulatory agency.

    “The U.S. must have a reliable and efficient method for tracking and finding livestock and poultry during an animal disease investigation or when an animal health emergency occurs,” Dr. Hillman said. He noted that producers and organizations have discussed at great length, the need for information to remain confidential. To protect data in regards to premises and animal identification, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, state-level agencies, such as the TAHC, and livestock organizations and associations are seeking national and state legislation to protect the data from public release or access.

    “Regulatory agencies do not need or want access to production data, but specific information, such as the age and class of animal, as well as movement information is critical for finding potentially infected or exposed animals during a disease situation,” he said.

    Today, it can take days to track the movement of livestock, to ensure that all exposed or diseased animals have been detected, Dr. Hillman pointed out. He predicted that, by 2008, when the national system is fully implemented and mandatory, tracking livestock movements could be streamlined, greatly enhancing disease eradication efforts. He stressed that the ability to rapidly identify animals and trace livestock or poultry movements is crucial to an effective animal disease response.

    Dr. Hillman explained that the national animal identification system, also called “NAIS,” has two major components. The first, he said, is the unique premises * or facility * identification, which identifies the location of livestock operations. This seven-character alphabetic and numerical ‘address’ is to be assigned to ranches and other sites where livestock or poultry are maintained or moved. Premises information will reside on a database, managed by each state and accessible only by animal health officials. Dr. Hillman said facility owners can obtain a premises identification number now by calling the TAHC’s headquarters in Austin at 1-800-550-8242. By late January, ranchers and facility owners in Texas also may register online through the TAHC’s web page at http://www.tahc.state.tx.us

    “The second component of the national system*animal identification--is ready for ‘field-testing.’ This involves the unique identification of each head of livestock moved from its original herd. For cattle, sheep, goats, cervidae (deer) and some other species of livestock, the identification device will be an electronic ear tag, also called a radio frequency (RFID) identification device. For other species, such as swine and poultry, the number can be applied to groups of animals, if they spend their entire production life together as a group or unit,” he said.

    Dr. Hillman explained that the TAHC, Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food and Forestry; and the Osage Nation in Oklahoma are working cooperatively on a year-long pilot project, funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), to test various aspects of the premises and animal identification. Field tests also are being conducted in at least 20 other states, to ensure the system will function well when it is fully implemented, said Dr. Hillman.

    “In Texas, we will work with specified ranches and livestock facilities, equipment suppliers and computer data service providers to test the effectiveness, durability and compatibility of equipment and databases for identifying and tracking individual animals,” said Dr. Hillman.

    “As many as 80,000 individually numbered electronic tags will be used by the pilot project participants, so cattle, sheep, goats or domestic deer can be identified prior to change of ownership or commingling with animals owned by other ranchers or farmers. The tags may be applied to animals before they leave the farm and ranch, or upon arrival at feedlots or order buyers’ facilities, at livestock markets or other livestock sites. This will give facility owners and managers an opportunity to evaluate the system and calculate the costs and time involved with tagging animals, and collecting and reporting animal movement data. Implantable electronic devices will be used for identifying and tracking horses.

    Unless a tag is broken or lost, an animal is to receive only one during its lifetime. The unique 15-digit number on each electronic ear tag or implantable device can be ‘read and recorded’ with a hand-held or stationary tag reader. Ear tags also are imprinted with the number, so the information can be accessed, even if readers are unavailable or out of service.

    When identified animals are sold, moved or harvested, project participants will report the event to third-party data service providers by computer, fax or mail, Dr. Hillman explained. Animal tag numbers will be correlated in the database to premises identification ‘addresses.’

    A major aspect of the project will involve determining problems that occur when integrating information from several data collection systems into a central or common database. Ultimately, when an animal’s number is queried, a report should list all the premise numbers where the animal had been maintained. Likewise, when a premise number is queried, the list of related animal identification numbers should appear. When an animal is harvested, its number will be retired.

    “With the ‘roll-out’ for the premises identification system, and field trials underway for animal identification, we are much closer to the goal of fighting disease more efficiently and effectively,” said Dr. Hillman. “Once the field trials are completed across the U.S., improvements can be made before the animal identification system is launched nationally. By that time, we hope to have confidentiality issues, and any equipment and database compatibility problems evaluated, addressed and resolved.”
     
  2. trickham

    trickham Well-Known Member

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    Vicki,

    So how does this relate to the ID tags that I am already putting on bucks and does that go to sale?
     

  3. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    Hi, the tags you use are for Scrapie? Yes as of now the Federal ID program is not going to be tied to the scrapie number, so yes two tags.

    Now, we did 'force' really by shear numbers for the Scrapie tags to be tied to registration tatoos in sheep and goats, first federaly but secondly state by state, so in ADGA registered dairy goats the only goats who have to wear a scrapie tag is a goat you are selling without registration papers and tattoo's in their ears. We are hoping to put a campaign together again for tattoo's or microchips. This campaign will be different, and I really can't see how we can win, since this is not about just four legged stock, but these numbers are going to also be on fowl. But the sheep and goat associations are huge in numbers, perhaps we can prevail. Vicki
     
  4. trickham

    trickham Well-Known Member

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    Great. As if one tag wasn't enough. :rolleyes: I SO love the Federal bureaucracy. I have been raising Boers and Boer X's. Does the registration thing apply to them too? Or just ADGA goats? Do I need to be putting Scrapie tags in the ears of registered Boers? I may have been over this issue with myself at an earlier date and just decided to use the Scrapie tags in everything since they are free, but I can't remember now. I will try to keep up to date on this issue through the Boer Goat magazine. The least they could do is integrate the two tags.

    Thanks,

    Nick
     
  5. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    I think it was Mr. Shirley in Texas that helped your boers not have to wear scrapie ear tags. They have the same rule here in Texas that us dairy goat folks have. Any goat that has it's registration papers that match the tattoo/microchip, can use that rather than the scrapie tag. Vicki
     
  6. M&G-Nubians

    M&G-Nubians Member

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    I guess I'm missing something. Why not just tie it into the scrapies tag ID's. My state number is a two letter prefix for the state and then a four digit flock number. Which will link everything right back to my premises. What better and simpler way to track stock back to a location. Or do away with the scrapies requirement and make manditory flock/herd registration site ID. Your premises just gets a location ID number and no matter what your raise thats the number that is used. Goats get the same location ID number as cattle or horses or chickens or bee hives. Oh wait - that would be to easy.
     
  7. trickham

    trickham Well-Known Member

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  8. Sondra Peterson

    Sondra Peterson Well-Known Member

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    Well I for one sure hope we prevail with just tatoos or micro chip as my mini mancha's are not going to look to cute with tags on their little tiny ears :no:
    Plus the fact that the tag manufactures won't be making a mint off my taxes
     
  9. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    I don't really think they care, nor in the grand scheme of things they should. Cows have tags now for TB, I am sure pigs have something, hens have ID bands etc. etc., how could a program that is used for all livestock make everyone happy...we want them to use our ADGA tattoos or scrapie ID (remember scrapie is just for sheep and goats) and the cow folks want them to use their numbers, perhaps tattoos, microchips or brands, pig folks want something else, emu, horse, fowl, turkeys??

    They want to track animals from birth to death, from womb to table. And there certainly wasn't any protests or picketing on the front page of my local paper or on the 5:00 news!

    Even with all the hoopla on the boards over scrapie, and I am by far not anyone in ADGA, a tiny tadpole in a very big pond, yet I (and that is just soo amazing) was the one who was on the steering committee and when they asked who I represented, I thought ADGA sounded alot better than Lonesome Doe :) with the gal who was in charge of it. Not one other dairy goat person there!

    So hopefully everyone who is wanting this to be easy will at least call, write and get involved, perhaps being able to use our herd tattoos like for scrapie will be able to work, but I doubt it. Least wise the only time the animal would have to wear the premise ID would in our situation, when it's sold for slaughter, same as scrapie, they could be handed to the next owner of breeding stock. Well at least hopefully :) Vicki
     
  10. Stacy Adams

    Stacy Adams Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the contact information Vicki.. I wrote 'em!! I for one do not want ear tags in my beautiful long ears!! I don't want them looking like the Boer goat ears that I see, with holes all in them from tags getting ripped out.. then where are you, but puttin in another tag.. :no:
     
  11. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    I live in the woods between a town of under 500 and a town of just over 5000, and there was an article in our small local county paper about this exact thing. They are going ahead with this, it will be a federal law by 2008. That's the first I heard of this, I thought it was in the planning stages only.

    None of you are hearing about this in your states? Vicki
     
  12. susanne

    susanne Nubian dairy goat breeder

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    i'm very new to goats. some of my goats have the scrapie tag and the TB tag and some only TB tag. why couldn't we only use a micro chip on them? i mean the same microchip that is used in dogs and cats for identification if they are lost. that would save the ears from getting bloody all the time and information is not getting lost.
    how much info do they want to put in this number anyway, i thought we are in the land of the free :rolleyes:
    looks like everybody wants to control anything.
    susanne