Two Q's (pt wood and bucks)

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Mountaineer, Jan 13, 2007.

  1. Mountaineer

    Mountaineer Well-Known Member

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    Two more basic questions for you all.

    Would goats chew pressure treated posts (fence and shelter)? I can't think of any realistic alternative when sinking them into the ground.

    Do bucks stink ALL year long or is this just during the breeding season? The Storey dairy goat guide suggests keeping him fenced in an area the keeper doesn't actually need to go into to feed/water. Why? Shouldn't you develop some sort of relationship with a 200lb beast that you'll be keeping around long term? A neighbor with goats leaves his buck in year round. It is a tiny buck with full size lamanchas, but the buck doesn't seem to be a problem aside from threatening to ram all the time- and I assume this could be trained out of them?

    Would a buck effectively be kept separate from the does by electric mesh fencing?

    Thanks!
     
  2. goatkid

    goatkid Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I've never seen my goats chew fence posts, but they do chew particle board on their goat houses. The haven't had any ill effects thus far. I don't paint the sides of the houses, only the tops where they can't reach to chew.
    Bucks are stinkiest when they are in rut. I don't run them with my does when they have babies. I like to be in control of the time of year my does kid, so they live away from the does except when I choose to pen breed certain does. I generally hand breed my milkers. Bucks can be aggressive and therefore are not to be played with. It is good, however to train them to be led and handled so it's easier to breed them, trim hooves and administer medication. My bucks live in pens constructed of welded wire cattle panels.
     

  3. Caprice Acres

    Caprice Acres AKA "mygoat" Staff Member Supporter

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    It could be separated by electric mesh... But if something ever happened to the electric supply, you can bet your butt that it would immediatley know, and I can easily see a buck crashing through the electric to get to a doe in heat. I suggest the cattle panels for bucks as well, as my two MINI bucks have demolished a section of rolled fence/t-posts between the two buck pens I use during breeding, because the other buck wanted in with the buck and doe who were breeding at the time... Also, if you want dairy goats, you don't want mr. stinky in with the does, because it makes thier milk taste bad; it's what gives goats the bad reputation. And yes, develop some sort of relation with your bucks. Mine come to the shout "boys!" during feeding time. They respect me and would not ever be allowed to rear up at me. Never been butted by one, except on accident.
     
  4. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

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    They might chew but adult goats who are having their mineral and fiber needs met, shouldn't chew much. Kids chew on everything and deficient adults chew badly too. Bored goats will chew, but mine don't get bored with free-choice hay and a pasture to roam. :)

    Bucks just smell like livestock when they aren't in rutt. Mine are in rutt at least six months out of the year........ :rolleyes:

    Bucks in rutt are very unpredictable, even the sweetest. Yes, you should be able to handle, lead, trim and groom a buck, but it really wouldn't be a bad idea to have an area where you can feed and water from outside his pen. Consider having a friend chore for you if your gone....it would be mighty handy. If I could do that, I would.

    Electric fence of any sort will not hold a buck in rutt if there is a doe in heat on the other side. In that case, the prize is worth the pain to any buck worth his salt. :angel:
    If a buck is not in rutt....they are usually pretty laid back and easy to contain.
     
  5. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Not wanting to be "Aggressively Critical" here(boy that thread is giving me a complex :p ), but everything in my experience and from talking to multiple breeders suggests that this is just an old wives tale. I've heard it many times, but it hasn't proved to be true for me.

    I have run bucks with my does many times and there was no difference in the milk. The main causes of *goaty* tasting milk are unclean milking procedure, wormy goat, improper straining and cooling, and mastitis. And some goats, no matter what you do, have strong milk.

    Just my experience anyway. :)
     
  6. Mountaineer

    Mountaineer Well-Known Member

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    Thanks everyone. I think my setup will work out well then. And can always be changed as it is basic.
    OJ- Can you suggest any tips about keeping a buck with does? This will be my first goat experience! Thanks.
     
  7. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Well, really the only thing is to be sure he is not one of those overly-aggressive bucks when it comes to does. As long as he settles down after the first day or so of introductions, he should be fine. I only run a buck with my doe herd after all planned breedings are done by hand. He is simply used as a clean-up buck to catch any does that *might* come back in heat. So he goes in about mid-November and comes out about a month before does start kidding. He eats and lives right with the girls, no problem. I don't run my bucks with my does year round for many reasons. :)
     
  8. Mountaineer

    Mountaineer Well-Known Member

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    Ok thanks. Thast sounds like a good idea. Hopefully my buck is a good one.
     
  9. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'll bet he is. :) Truly, I haven't met a buck yet that was too aggressive with does. But I have heard of some.
     
  10. Mountaineer

    Mountaineer Well-Known Member

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    It's funny that's what my book says too. The author has only had good buck experiences but has 'heard' of aggressive bucks. I wonder if it comes down to being a wives tale like them eating tin cans...
     
  11. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Well, I have never had a buck who was aggressive *with his does*....but I have owned an aggressive buck. He literally tried to kill me one day......aggressive bucks isn't an old wives tale.....its something we all have to be careful about. I admit its rare, but the possibility is there. Bucks are a lot of bone and muscle driven by hormones. I love my boys....but I never totally let my guard down around them. They are big enough that they don't have to *try* to hurt you....to really hurt you. Its just like with bulls, treat them with respect and always keep in mind what they are capable of. :)
     
  12. DocM

    DocM Well-Known Member

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    Coming in late, but I have pressure treated posts in one of my buck pens, along with creosote soaked timbers and regular split cedar posts - and I haven't yet seen my goats chew on anything except the regular T11 siding on their shed. I don't think its an issue (cribbing) unless they're craving a mineral. I raised all three of my bucks from kids, all of them were bottle kids, and they're pretty friendly. I would cull a disagreeable or dangerous buck. Think of it as another attribute (behavior) you want to breed for. My bucks are pretty smelly during breeding season. I choose to house them a ways off from my does because I swear, you can't walk by the pen without getting the smell on you. Goat's milk is fragile, it picks up flavors from odors very easily. The does wouldn't pick up the smell in their milk by osmosis, the milk can pick up the flavor by simply being set out near the bucks. If you take care to set your milk up quickly then the proximity of the bucks to the does shouldn't make any difference. I've had bucks in with my does during breeding season, continued to milk, and didn't pick up any strong new flavors.
     
  13. manygoatsnmore

    manygoatsnmore Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Hmm, that may be another advantage to miking with the Udderly EZ milker this year. By being able to cap the milk as soon as I finish milking one side, it'll eliminate the exposure to any off odors, be it buck or barn manure (no matter how clean you milk, if your milk stand in in the barn, there are going to be odors).

    My bucks range from downright pests (love the attention) to a little shy and wild. None are aggressive. I would cull an aggression buck, even it the blood lines were supreme, because I don't want to breed that trait into my herd. Accidental aggression, as in standing between a buck in raging rut and the doe who's flagging lsemaphore signals at him, is a different matter. I don't hold that against the buck - that would constitute "stupid human behavior" on my part, lol!