Two Jersey Cows Both in Milk.

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Haggis, Jun 2, 2004.

  1. Haggis

    Haggis MacCurmudgeon

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    I drove out to look at 2 Jerseys today: 1 is a great 7 year old cow, the other, an 8 year old cow has a high cell count but has always been used as a nurse for other calves. $1000 for the pair.

    Or, $550 for the 7 year old, and $500 for the other.

    Either or both, the farmer doesn't care.

    Haggis @ Wolf Cairn Moor
     
  2. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    What is a high cell count? Would this be bacteria in the milk??
    Do you know when they were fresh, and if they are bred. If he has a bull, and they aren't bred within three months of freshening there could be a problem. As far as whether you should take them both would have to be your call. Do you want the extra work that goes with the second cow? Do you have a large enough pasture for both of them. Sure don't want to be forced to feed hay when they should have pasture. If one is raising calves, the calves will need some pasture also. The two would need a bale of hay between them daily plus some grain. That could make your coffee cream expensive. What do you think is best? I have a feeling you want them both or you wouldn't have a question. The price sounds reasonable with cattle prices as high as they are.
     

  3. Haggis

    Haggis MacCurmudgeon

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    We have agreed to take the 7 year old cow; due to freshen again on January 4, for $550.

    We are up in the air over the 8 year old with the high cell count. She has always had a high cell count: some years part of the milk has been sold to a creamery, some years the farmers family has used some of the milk for the table, other years all of the milk has gone to feeding calves. She will nurse any calf without a struggle. Her price is $500.

    The farmer also has a 3 year that has just freshened for a bit more. She has a blind quarter, but otherwise is fit as a fiddle. This morning he called and mentioned a second calf heifer due to freshen in December; also Jerseys.

    We are definitely at a crossroads here. My wife and I use at least five or six gallons of milk a week. We have five grown children, 9 Grandchildren (with another on the way, and various in-laws, out-laws, and flux-in-laws who all use a lot of milk and butter. There are a number of local family’s who have expressed an interest in purchasing milk from us should we wish to sell a bit.

    Adding to our equation is the fact that 4 of our 7 Milking Devon heifers and cows will be freshening in 6 to 10 weeks.

    We do want to have a Jersey or two about the place for their rich milk; but how many is too many? Twenty minutes to milk a cow by hand and “Ncows X 20 minutes = ? hours a day milking twice a day”. I don’t want to have to try to go back to work just to feed cattle either.

    Jeesh!!! What to do? What to do? How often does one find so many Jerseys at such good prices?

    In the end we’ll most likely buy the one Jersey and wait for our Milking Devon cattle to kick into high gear.

    Haggis @ Wolf Cairn Moor
     
  4. goatlady

    goatlady Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Haggis, how well do you know this farmer? From your posts it sems the animals he is selling all have something "minor" wrong with them. Sounds like he is culling his herd and you might be buying the culls. Why buy a cow with anything wrong with her?
     
  5. Haggis

    Haggis MacCurmudgeon

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    Herself made it clear a few minutes ago that we would be buying at least two Jerseys. She always knows best.

    By-the-by, the farmer I'm dealing with milks 9 cows for his milk check and currently has 12 in milk with heifers coming fresh. This is why he is selling a few cows.

    One thing I mentioned to my wife, and to the farmer is a fact of which most of us are aware. There are three vaild and usual reasons for a farmer to sell his dairy cows: 1. S/He is selling out an entire herd and the good go with the bad. 2. S/He is selling older cows or culling his/her herd of problem animals. 3. S/He is raising milk heifers expressly for the homesteader dairy cow market and doesn't know if the heifer will be a great cow or hamburger.

    Our farmer is of the second reason variety.

    Haggis @ Wolf Cairn Moor