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For want of a better caption I called them TV trainers, Monty Roberts, Clinton Anderson, Chris Cox, Buck Brannemen, John Lyons, Ray Hunt ect. Who have you seen, what do you think, who would you like to work with, who do you think is all show?

I have meet Monty Roberts and seen him work. It is very obvious that he has worked with horses for years and lots of hours. I was impressed with the quiet and positive way he handled horses.

I have also been to a Clinton Anderson clinic. He's funny, entertaining, seems to do a good job and is quite a showman. He sells lots of high priced things I don't think you really need.

Buck Brannamen's cousin was my youngest DD's college room mate. She knows him fairly well and is both a good trainer and very sincere, according to DD. She and the room mate filled out some of his early clinics.

I have a little different way of looking at the clinics, tapes, or books. If I get one good idea or am reminded of something I have forgotten, I think it's a success. I don't expect to become a professional, or learn how to train in one weekend or week long clinic. I have heard people say that's why they go to a clinic or faithfully watch someone on TV. I think they don't know enough to know what they don't know.

What do you think?http://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/extension/
 

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A lot depends on the person doing the watching. I did not grow up w/horses. I was in my 40s B4 I got my first horse, and did not have a clue as to how to get the relationship I wanted. And to be honest, I was about ready to give the horse back. (The owner had died, and they just wanted to find a good home for her.) A friend lent me her Pony Boy tapes. It made a world of difference.

I have participated in clinics w/Pony Boy and have his DVDs. They were not high priced, nor where his rope halters and leads-both of which I have. They actually FIT my Arab. I could not find a rope halter B4 that that did. But, I understood what he was doing, and was able to put it into practice.

However, I have also worked w/horses for other people that did not understand what they were trying to do. I do not know if this is due to them or the person they were listening to. The horses knew that if they turned to the center and stopped, they got to stop working, so that's what they did almost immediately.

I have also worked w/people that understood what they need to do. Some have even bought all the expensive stuff from this trainer or that. But, they lack the commitment to do the work necessary.

I have seen several of the different ones at expos, and basically, they're all the same. But what appeals to one person from one trainer might be what turns another off. And, I cannot stand the attitude of some of the followers. They act like they are the only ones who know anything about horses.
 

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I've actually ridden in Ray Hunt clinics. He was one the best horsemen I've ever met, one of maybe 4 or 5 I've known/worked with in 60 years of dealing with horses. I've also watched a couple of Buck Brannamen clinics and have a great deal of respect for him as well, but then he worked a lot with Ray Hunt in earlier years so I would expect their methods to be very similar.

I've seen the others on TV and at horse expo demonstrations and I'm afraid my opinion of them tends to be on the order of "great show men" rather than 'great horsemen' ... almost all of them are much better at selling themselves to wannabe horse trainers than anything else. In his earlier years, at least, Ray Hunt wasn't nearly the 'people person' the TV trainers are but he never read a horse wrong.

Ray Hunt did everything everyone else does and mostly did it better with nothing more than a lariat and a web halter and cotton lead rope.
 

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I've actually ridden in Ray Hunt clinics. He was one the best horsemen I've ever met, one of maybe 4 or 5 I've known/worked with in 60 years of dealing with horses. I've also watched a couple of Buck Brannamen clinics and have a great deal of respect for him as well, but then he worked a lot with Ray Hunt in earlier years so I would expect their methods to be very similar.

I've seen the others on TV and at horse expo demonstrations and I'm afraid my opinion of them tends to be on the order of "great show men" rather than 'great horsemen' ... almost all of them are much better at selling themselves to wannabe horse trainers than anything else. In his earlier years, at least, Ray Hunt wasn't nearly the 'people person' the TV trainers are but he never read a horse wrong.

Ray Hunt did everything everyone else does and mostly did it better with nothing more than a lariat and a web halter and cotton lead rope.
I have to add that it was the Bill and Tom Dorrance that taught Ray Hunt. I agree with everything you said.
 

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Which one is the idiot that rode a horse onto a moving trailer? That was just stupid... I can't recall his name, his "training" has levels and his disciples worship him like the family did Charles Manson. I haven't had enough coffee...
 

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There was a local 4H kid that earned an internship with Clinton Anderson and couldn't stay because of the techniques used behind the scenes. She couldn't (signed non disclosure agreements) say what she saw but she disagreed so strongly she left the program.
 

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I've been working with one of the Road to the Horse wild-card competitors for over a year - James Cooler. He travels to Ohio sometimes and does clinics and private lessons. Wow - what a difference in my horse!
Just got back from a weekend clinic with him and brought my new yearling to get him started on ground work.

I have not seen some of the bigger names, but love the 1-on-1 contact I have with James and I really connect with his methods.
 

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I think you can learn valuable things from them, but you NEED to think about what you do. They are not gods to be worshiped, either. The best training really is with someone that you work with over time, that you get to know, whose style and methods make sense to you, are thoughtful of the horse, emphasize safety in handling and help you to improve over time.

In my opinion, teaching someone to train an animal requires somehow imparting that sense of timing of either correction or reward and that the teacher also imparts an ability to read the animal in question. This is so much easier when working together that even an average trainer you work with week after week can be much more profitable than a top notch trainer on dvd's. When I was training dogs, I wanted to learn about clicker training, for example. I went to some seminars and, working one on one, I soon "got" the timing and how it worked. Reading about it, watching a tape or two and experimenting just wasn't the same.

I watched a few tv trainers when I got my horse a few years back. I had ridden a lot as a kid and taken a lot of lessons, etc. Watching various trainers on TV gave me some ideas to try, but I wasn't very good at it. (Fortunately with my older and very sweet horse, it didn't really matter.) I did go to a seminar in person and got a much better idea of the timing, etc. However, I would have gotten more out of straight up lessons, one on one, with a local trainer, if I had wished to do more with my horse.
 

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Which one is the idiot that rode a horse onto a moving trailer? That was just stupid... I can't recall his name, his "training" has levels and his disciples worship him like the family did Charles Manson. I haven't had enough coffee...
Parelli, maybe? I think his *system* has levels ... and you can't do it right if you don't have the training aids he's 'invented' ...
 

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Parelli, maybe? I think his *system* has levels ... and you can't do it right if you don't have the training aids he's 'invented' ...
That's it! He is truly terrible.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
There was a local 4H kid that earned an internship with Clinton Anderson and couldn't stay because of the techniques used behind the scenes. She couldn't (signed non disclosure agreements) say what she saw but she disagreed so strongly she left the program.
I'm not surprised, in general I think Aussies tend to be harder on horses, but that might be from too much Snowey river movies.
 

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Ray Hunt and Buck Brannaman are my preferences but I do feel that it is a good idea for anyone training horses to review as many techniques as humanly possible. You'll naturally gravitate toward what makes more sense to you the more you see, the more you grow.
 

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I'm not surprised, in general I think Aussies tend to be harder on horses, but that might be from too much Snowy river movies.
I think working cowboys ... the riders that basically make a living horseback, doing a job ... appear to 'hobby' riders to be harder on their horses. I don't think it is necessarily an error in perception, I do think working ranch horses are used harder, they are trained as quickly as possibly to get the job done and their riders do not have the time to cajole a reluctant horse ... it often comes down to 'do it or else' ...

To some extent, I think what we see is that many of the working Aussie cowboys are doing the job that American cowboys did 50 years or more ago, more days horseback and much bigger areas to cover.
 

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I think working cowboys ... the riders that basically make a living horseback, doing a job ... appear to 'hobby' riders to be harder on their horses. I don't think it is necessarily an error in perception, I do think working ranch horses are used harder, they are trained as quickly as possibly to get the job done and their riders do not have the time to cajole a reluctant horse ... it often comes down to 'do it or else' ...

To some extent, I think what we see is that many of the working Aussie cowboys are doing the job that American cowboys did 50 years or more ago, more days horseback and much bigger areas to cover.
An old rancher once told me that he whispers to his horses too but sometimes once in a while, he needs to whisper a bit louder.
 

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I grew up around horses long before the craze of 'TV Trainers' was ever even an option to be considered. Horses were broke using the time tested principles of regular riding and wet saddle blankets. From what I've seen, I think Buck Brannaman and Dennis Reis are pretty good. Parelli is nothing but a dog and pony show, I don't care for Clinton Anderson and I plain old don't like Chris Cox. Julie Goodnight seems to have a good understanding of horses and could be helpful to a novice. Just my .02.
 

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I've watched the Monty Roberts tapes and there were some things I liked, some I didn't. I've never been able to watch any of the regular TV programs by other trainers because all they seem to be is infomercials.
 
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