TV Package question

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by FarmboyBill, Sep 9, 2017.

  1. flewism

    flewism Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    685
    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2007
    Location:
    Monroe Co MI
    I have a DSL that is only 6mps and it is not fast enough to stream Netflix clean and constantly . I can download, save and watch later.
     
  2. geo in mi

    geo in mi Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    6,169
    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2008
    But, isn't that really the case, anyway? You don't get real time TV--especially on your local channels--so you are always watching a delayed program? --Unless you are willing to pay more? How does that work, I've been trying to figure that out? Live at eleven,,,, last night?

    Is there really anything as free ala carte, live streaming?

    geo
     

  3. mnn2501

    mnn2501 Dallas

    Messages:
    11,725
    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2008
    Location:
    N of Dallas, TX
    Free? yes, ala carte? yes, Live? no
     
    RichNC likes this.
  4. Bellyman

    Bellyman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,760
    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2013
    Location:
    Fulltime RVer looking for a Tennessee homestead
    Funny thing is, the price of TVs has come down dramatically. The flat screen TV we bought 6 or 7 years ago, which was pretty nice at the time, we paid $500+ for. The same size Smart TV today, with way more features than we have, is somewhere around $150 to $200.

    We tried using our old Wii to do Netflix. It didn't seem to want to work all that well. Could have just bought a new TV but right now don't have a place to put a bigger TV.

    When I got the ROKU, it was a toss up between ROKU, Amazon Firestick, and Apple TV. I can't even remember why I decided on the ROKU but it worked well enough. There is some free stuff but I've never found much I wanted to watch. Guess it would depend on a person's taste. There may be more options now.

    We could watch stuff on the computer, but it's more comfortable watching longer programs on the TV.

    If you want the freest of the free, there is always an antenna. Works great in some places, not so great in others.
     
  5. GTX63

    GTX63 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    440
    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2016
    I will state that our internet is limited to 6 mb and we are able to stream live tv. Yes, if our boys are in the other room doing online gaming it may sometimes lag, and it may not, but for the most part we are able to watch whatever whenever on youtube, netflix, amazon or playstation vue, which gives us everything dish used to charge $120 for $39.
     
  6. FarmboyBill

    FarmboyBill Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    21,981
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2005
    All I can say is that A DVD can be plugged into the TV.
     
    GTX63 likes this.
  7. Vanillahobbes

    Vanillahobbes Member

    Messages:
    12
    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2013
    Location:
    Pierce City, MO
    We have an Amazon Fire TV, a little device similar to Roku. It works about the same; we have Amazon Prime and it's great. You can watch Prime shows and movies (lots of them free), and you can add apps like Netflix and Hulu. Those apps are a few dollars a month ($10 for Netflix soon to be $12, and around $7? For Hulu). All for WAY less than cable. Haven't had cable in 5-6 years. Highly recommend all or any of them. So much to watch.
     
  8. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    8,266
    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2004
    Location:
    MN
    1. You need a fast enough internet service. Some of the slower speeds out in the country are not fast enough. Using a streaming service like this will use up a lot of data, or minutes, of your internet service; if you are limited as to how much data you can use per month, it likely will use a -lot-.

    2. You need some dodad (a physical thing) that can access the Internet and can access your tv or laptop or tablet. This dodad gets on the Internet and picks up the many many many 1000s of tv offerings that are on the Internet, and decodes it into something that you can watch on a tv, computer, or tablet. You pay for this dodad once. This would be the Internet version of a 'cable box'. Each company offers service to different 'channels' on the internet, so start you have to pick one that gives you something you are interested in seeing. Some of these dodads are simle and only plug into a hmdi port. Others also have 'composite' connections that will plug into an older tv with those round rca connectors. These dodads start around $35. AppleTV, Rouku, Amazon Firestick, chromecast, you mentioned several, and many more.

    3. There are a few generally crappy 'free' tv stations out there. There is no added cost to getting these few free (probably kinda not so interesting) channels.

    4. To get 'real' cable channels, you need to subscribe to a service, with a monthly fee. Sling, Netflix, and many many more. Again there are many different services out there, just as there are many different cable companies. And they each have different packages you can subscribe to. These have different prices, depending what you choose. There will be a bill every month.


    So to recap, you need a good internet speed, you need to buy a little piece of hardware, and to get anything that is worthwhile you will need to pay another company a monthly fee.

    Are you trying to get to see old tv reruns, or old movies, or new movies, or do you want to see current cable tv channels, or local stations? Or just the few free mostly crappy stuff offered? Different dodads are better or worse at offering the different options here, so you got to pick the dodad that gets you what you want.

    Oh, I forgot: if you have a tv provider - a tv cable subscription - many of those cable companies allow you to access many of the cable stations you get for free through the Internet. You need to sign up with your email address and so forth, and then can go through the steps to allow individual channels to come through your dodad. The exact details and how to do it and which channels will do this depends upon your cable service. You do -not- need a cable service for all of my above paragraphs, but is you do have a cable service, it may be possible to get many of your cable channels on your computer or tablet or phone.


    I covered a lot of ground, it is confusing. Hopefully this helps discuss the bits that interest you and ask questions. It is sort of intimidating, because it is very different how one gets to tv over the internet than how we used to do it.

    Paul
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2017
  9. pairofthrees

    pairofthrees Active Member

    Messages:
    33
    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2016
    Location:
    IL 35 miles south of Chicago
    Not all of the free channels are that bad, I've had a roku for 7 years and they are now rolling out their own channel to be free content with adds. Other 'channels' are also available for free although the amazon prime, 7.99/mo for hulu and 9.99/mo for netflix is perfectly reasonable. If it were just me I'd only have amazon, as I have prime anyway for the free shipping, but two teenage girls might lose their minds without netflix at this point. Sling TV can provide a small offering of channels as well but I find the offerings lacking and at $20 or $25 a month it doesn't feel like I'm saving much.

    Crackle has probably the best offerings for free, even some exclusive content but has commercials.

    Pluto TV has a similar setup to old time cable with many 'channels' running that you can choose to watch. I use it for CBS news, Newsy and a weather channel mostly again free.

    tubitv can provide some entertainment as well, commercials but again free

    There are also plenty of niche channels with old westerns, sci-fi B movies and a random Popeye or Bugs Bunny cartoon.
    You need a good internet connection and a roku box will provide plenty of entertainment options if you're just looking to pass the time. If there is anything you are specifically looking to watch it probably will cost you.
     
    rambler likes this.
  10. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

    Messages:
    14,953
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    Between Crosslake and Emily Minnesota
    That's a good summary, Paul, but I have to disagree with #2.

    You normally do not need any hardware dodad, like AppleTV, Rouku, Amazon Firestick, Chromecast, etc. to access Netflix, Amazon Prime, Sling, Hulu, etc.

    All one needs is the correct cable from a computer (that has internet service) to a TV (e.g. HDMI cable or HDMI adapter cable). With such a cable, what you see on your computer screen is what you see on your TV screen.

    We do this all the time. We have both Amazon Prime and Netflix. We just plug the cable into the computer and into the TV, type in one of these streaming services, and viola! we watch the movie on TV. No hardware involved (other than our computer). :)
     
    mnn2501 likes this.
  11. mnn2501

    mnn2501 Dallas

    Messages:
    11,725
    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2008
    Location:
    N of Dallas, TX
    Correct, we have an HDMI cable running from a laptop to our TV and it works great. There is no need for anything else as long as you have a computer and decent internet.

    Unless he's changed it recently, FBB has satellite internet so he will get throttled back when he maxes out his data for the month.
     
  12. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    8,266
    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2004
    Location:
    MN
    Actually I agree that the free stuff can be pretty good. But it isn't like tv was, nor is it like cable tv options. Streaming tv is different....

    I am working my way through the 'Space: 1999' episodes on tubitv, have not seen them since the 1970s watching at 1:00am on a Saturday night - well Sunday morning I guess. Had to sit real close tot he tv, barely any audio so I didn't wake dad. Maybe I've been a sci if nerd for a bit too long.....

    I just got into this streaming stuff a couple months ago.so it's all new to me. I got a Samsung 'smart' DVD player a couple years ago, but turns out it is not very smart, does not support much at all..... the free stuff on it is disappointing.

    The roku I got was pretty easy to set up, and offers some interesting free stuff. I got sling with it, as I want the racing channels which I can't get without adding packages to the wife's cable subscription. She is paying $102 a month for about 70 cable channels. (Her side of the household stuff, so it's for us but she takes care of it....) most of them aren't even hd as she has the very basic package, to get better or more channels we would have to move up to a DVD rental from the cable co plus more fees and added package levels....

    Compared to that, the $30 a month for about 1/2 the cable channels with Sling (or $$45 a month for nearly all of the good ones we get through cable) through Sling seems like a good deal.

    I'm trying to work with an Amazon Firestick now, was told it has lots more better free apps than the roku, but so far I've found setting up the Firestick to be much more cumbersome.

    We get internet through dsl, and 10-14 speed seems plenty, I thought 5 works but probably not for several others using at the same time?

    Paul
     
  13. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    8,266
    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2004
    Location:
    MN
    You are probably quite right.

    It seemed one would tie up the computer tho, while watching tv, and that was an issue. Starting up the computer and tying it up just to watch tv seemed cumbersome to me, so I really didn't explore it. The cable you pictured will cost nearly what one of the cheaper sticks cost, and then you get a real remote with it to watch tv and can leave your computer alone for other uses. Probably why I didn't even really consider it. Use a $35 stick to put streaming tv on a TV set, or use a $300-1200 computer plus a new cable to put streaming tv on a TV set..... for my uses it seemed much cheaper to get the stick. :)

    Paul
     
  14. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

    Messages:
    14,953
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    Between Crosslake and Emily Minnesota
    Good points, Paul. In our household, we have two laptops, so tying one up has not been an issue.

    I'm wondering, can you stream youtube movies or movies that are available on the internet from websites like PBS, National Geographic, History Channel, etc. with the Firestick?
     
  15. The girl loves flowers

    The girl loves flowers Active Member

    Messages:
    37
    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2017
    Location:
    From KS. but currently in California.
    There's Netflix yes, but they have many crappy shows. Now there's PUREFLIX for better shows . Same setup as Netflix.Also, all tv news channels are corrupt and you won't get the truth anyway. Best bet is to use YouTube for the real news. I used to watch Alex Jones news mostly and the more I watched him the more I picked up on when he shares about other real news websites. Alex jones still being my favorite.
    I have slow internet but unlimited minutes. It's cheapest and Standard internet in my area.
     
  16. arabian knight

    arabian knight Miniature Horse lover Supporter

    Messages:
    25,143
    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2005
    Location:
    West Central WI.
    And all those Free Channels Over The Air ones are great~! Many show old shows you know the great ones fro the 50's and 60's One Channel is even called Me Tv Memorable Entertainment. I Love it. Love these free over the air channels. Another one is called H and I. Which stands for Heroes and Icons. Great over the air free channel to watch. That is IF YOUR Area gets them that is. Some may only get one some may get 10 of these great channels One never knows until you Re- Scan for them and have a nice outdoor antenna to pull in these free ones. And those that have a Digital TV AND a outside antenna be it new one or one that is 20 years old a person should re-scan for these channels every 6 months or so as one never knows when a station close to you may start up one of these free over the air channels.
     
  17. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....? Supporter

    Messages:
    49,754
    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2006
    Location:
    Eastern North Carolina
    They're less than $7 at Wal Mart.
    A Roku stick is $30
     
  18. Mammie71

    Mammie71 Member

    Messages:
    8
    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2017
    We use our ps4 and an internet connection

    Sent from my SM-J727U using Homesteading Today mobile app
     
  19. keenataz

    keenataz Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,356
    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2009
    Location:
    Central British Columbia
    We live in the boonies. We use an internet wi-fi hub and PS4 to get Net Flix. It works pretty good. Occassional buffering but I would say 99% good. Only issue is if a couple are using the wi fi in the house
     
  20. dyrne

    dyrne Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    95
    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2015
    People often blame their internet connection when using wireless devices to stream TV. I'd suggest if having trouble with Netflix and you have a 6mbps connection that you try playing it from a device plugged in via network cable to your router. Netflix transcodes to lower quality to adjust for bad connections.

    If you are going to buy a device to stream TV then unless you are comfortable enough with technology to make sure you have a decent wireless router and a device that supports 802.11ac, I'd recommend getting a device that has a network port on it.

    Example: https://pasteboard.co/GKe9Wlf.jpg
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2017