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Discussion Starter #1
I didn't want to hijack the thread on Netflix vs. Hulu.

We now use Verizon for phones and internet service. We have 5G for the computer so we cannot use this connection for watching movies.

We got Verizon because we used to travel for business quite a bit and we visited our children in other states and we have always been able to depend on it, but that is changing, so we are willing to change to a different kind of connection.

My question, and please pardon my ignorance, what exactly do I need to watch Hulu, Netflix or Amazon Prime? Assuming I can't use Verizon. Is there some company I could use for internet connection as well as watching TV. We do have a Roku box our son bought us, but just don't know how to use it.

Thanks in advance,

Trixie
 

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My name is not Alice
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What do you have in the way of internet besides the MiFi? It all hinges on that. We use DSL from the local telco. Cheap and effective internet. Works for Netflix & such.

You need:
1) "hi speed" internet access.
2) An internet connected device, such as the Roku, which can render streamed content.

Alternatives available for #1 include DSL, cable, satellite. (Not sure if satellite is appropriate for streaming).

Alternatives for #2 include, Roku, Apple TV, many newer flat screen TVs, or even a plain old PC.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Abe,

If you mean what do we now have, meaning satellite, cable, etc - nothing. Currently we simply watch videos and DVD's.

If you mean what do we have available to us in the area, I don't know and I don't know enough to ask.

I do know some people have something called Century Link as it shows as an available connection when I sign on to verizon. Would this work and do you need a regular telephone line for that?
 

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Century Link is what I have. It is the local phone company. I only use the internet connection not the phone. I got an ad in the mail from them that stated that they could provide phone, internet, and tv.
 

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My name is not Alice
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Just call them and ask. You won't be the first person that didn't know what to ask for that called them asking for the very same thing. Just say "I want high-speed internet access. No dial-up. I want to pay the minimum monthly amount possible without extra's like caller ID. I won't even be using the phone line for phone calls." That should get the conversation rolling.

Most likely, Century Link will work. I say "most likely", because it just depends on where your place is and how far you are from their infrastructure. Our house is so far away, that they would not guarantee that it would work. But I could have it installed at no risk. They originally couldn't get it to happen technology-wise. Then a new neighbor moved in, required phone service, and this forced them to shuffle things around at our switch. As a result, they were able to get us online. But at such horrible speeds that we couldn't watch streaming TV. Then in March or so, they upgraded the entire switch, and now our speed is wonderful.

Like Bluerose said, you don't really need to use the phone or even have one installed. We don't. I'm sure the phone "rings" on many occasion, but there isn't a phone there to ring. If CenturyLink it is like our DSL (high-speed internet over phone lines), the phone service comes "with the deal". We have Fairpoint, which bought out CenturyLink in this area. So it was all CenturyLink's infrastructure.

Our bill is roughly $40/month.
 

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One way to watch streaming video over the internet is to have an internet connection that provides at least 3 Mb per second of download speed, a computer that will handle the download, and a connection from the computer to the TV.

The new digital flat screen TVs will have an HDMI connection on them and newer computers will have an HDMI output on the motherboard accessed on the back of the computer.

Older CRT TVs may have the round RCA type jacks for input on the back. I had to buy a video card for my computer that had the RCA type outputs and the monitor output. It allows the computer image to be shown on both the computer monitor and the TV at the same time.

Your internet access has to have no data down load cap or one you can live with. Watching video is a lot of data download and you can hit a cap pretty quickly. When you hit the cap the download speed gets really slow and/or they charge you a fortune for going over. You get a new cap at the beginning of the month.
 

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I am thinking of getting rid of Dish, and have signed up for a free trial from Hulu. So far, I am not impressed, but at a savings of about $70 per month, I can overlook a few quality issues.

A concern of mine is that to get the simulation of remote control capability, a wireless mouse will be needed in both my bedroom and the living room. As far as I can find, ALL wireless mice work on 2.4 gh, and will likely interfere with each other.

Any thoughts or suggestions?
 

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My neighbor has 2 remote wireless mice, they work good one is in her bedroom the other in the living room. Yes at times they are both being used.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks, everyone.

Yes, I guess the best thing to do is just ask, and see what is available around here.

As I say, I'm sure Century Link is available - at last for computer, so I could start with them.

Thanks again,
 

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My name is not Alice
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Thanks, everyone.

Yes, I guess the best thing to do is just ask, and see what is available around here.

As I say, I'm sure Century Link is available - at last for computer, so I could start with them.

Thanks again,
The modem provided by our telco doubles as a wifi access point and network switch/router. With it, I can have wired & wireless computers and devices connected to the net. I don't know anything about Roku, but I do have a cheapie AppleTV. It is one of the wireless devices on my network. With it, I can watch all of the streaming content on my big TV. It connects to the internet on one side, and my TV (actually the whole home entertainment system) on the other. It's pretty swell. I strongly suspect that you will be able to get the Roku online in the same fashion. You could experiment right now with your verizon hotspot. If the Roku presents any kind of wireless connection options, you're all set.
 
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Pretty much any phone or tv company in your area can provide some version of the internet. We use Time Warner now. There is a fairly high monthly cap on data, after which it slows down and we are not charged extra. It is also month to month stating out which was important to us at the time since we were broke newlyweds. I think we pay $60 a month for the second fastest connection.
 
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