Turning hog house into fish pond?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Hilly Acre Farm, Feb 21, 2004.

  1. Hilly Acre Farm

    Hilly Acre Farm Active Member

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    Ok, maybe this is a bad idea, just trying to figure out what we are going to do with this building, it's not going to be used for raising hogs, that's for sure. This building is 30' wide by 90' long. At the moment, the manure still needs to be pumped out, but what if we took down the building & just had the dug out part, that is 4' deep. Could we use that as a fish pond? I don't know whether we would try to raise eating type fish, or just have a pretty pond with colorful fish, but what are the possibilities? It seems like it sure holds water well. Any ideas are welcome, fish related or not. I know it would have to be aerated, but how would it all work during the winter?

    Thanks,

    Kim
     
  2. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    I don't know if you could get it clean enough (hog manure is high in copper) or sealed but why not raise trout inside the building?
     

  3. Don Armstrong

    Don Armstrong In Remembrance

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    Roofs are expensive. I don't know much, but i do know it's a lot more expensive to put a building back up than to leave it up. I also know if you've got fish out in the open you'll have birds eating them, but if you've got them in the shade, in the cool, under cover, they'll live a lot better.
     
  4. If you don't want to take down the roof you can always put in skylighting and/or electric lights. In water that shallow I would try tilapia. It is a nice light fish and can be used for just about any cooking method. Here's a website that may be of use http://ag.arizona.edu/azaqua/ata.html
     
  5. The heck with raising fish. Sounds like you have an ideal set up for growing wasbai. If you can figure out how to grow it (most of the growing information is proprietary) this stuff is worth a small fortune like 70-100 clams per pound.
     
  6. Hammer

    Hammer Active Member

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    I am wondering what wasbai is?
     
  7. Hammer

    Hammer Active Member

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    In order to have fish you need to either have a water source to constantly change the water or get into pumps and filters and maintain the right purity of water.
     
  8. fordson major

    fordson major construction and Garden b Supporter

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    when you get the pit pumped out get some breathing apperatus and go exploreing there will be 6 inchs of liquid/manure left in the pit that will have to be vaced out .if the walls and peers are good then look at sealing any leaks .even hog manure seals! might be best to get tanks to raise the fish in and use the pit as the dump for waste water.tropical fish sell well and more profit from them than eating fish .what ever you do do not enter the pumped out pit unequiped and stay away when it is being pumped
     
  9. Hammer

    Hammer Active Member

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    The 70 to 100 clams per pound caught my interest. I did some searching. It is actually wasabi and can be purchased for $10 a pound for pure paste and is not really all that hard to grow. Just need shade rich soil and mild temps and takes 2 years to mature. Seems hardly worth it to me.
     
  10. Have you thought about filling the hole back in with gravel and then possibly raise something like catfish or talipia in tanks inside the building. It is becoming a big business but I'm not sure just how much investment there is into it.