Turkey supply very high this year?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Paranoid, Nov 24, 2005.

  1. Paranoid

    Paranoid Homebrewed Happiness

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    It seems that even with the raised prices on everything due to gas, turkeys are extremely cheap this year.

    I'm probably gonna go out tomorrow and check for any further reduced prices and pick a couple more up for deep storage.
     
  2. whodunit

    whodunit Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I thought about doing this, too, with turkey here at 79 cents a pound (I've heard even cheaper elsewhere).

    On the negative side, my DW and MIL say that turkey easily frostbites and doesn't keep well. Any experience with this?

    One option I thought about was cooking it, deboning, using the carcass for soup, then vacuum-packing all the cooked meat. It can then be used for various dishes.

    Any thoughts?
     

  3. Paranoid

    Paranoid Homebrewed Happiness

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    turkeys come vacuum sealed if you get the frozen ones, i cant imagine how it could possibly get frostbite, frostbite is a problem with living entities, once it's dead i think they are referring to "freezer burn" and since that is nothing more than a dehydrated portion of meat i dont see how it would be possible as the turkey is sealed in heavy plastic and unable to dehydrate.
     
  4. ThreeJane

    ThreeJane Me Love Your Face

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    29 cents a pound at the local albertsons if you buy $25 or more in groceries (and who doesn't before Thanksgiving?)

    This is my first year makin' a turkey, wish me luck. I've always been lucky and eaten Thanksgiving elsewhere; this year, we're having turkey today, tomorrow AND Sunday. I'm having MORE T'giving turkey up in North Idaho, where I have minimal friends and NO family than I ever did in SoCal. Go figure.

    :D
     
  5. ladycat

    ladycat Chicken Mafioso Staff Member

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    Got one for 38c a pound with $10 purchase, my grocery list was over $10 so no problem. Not for Thanksgiving, nobody to cook for but me, but 38c/lb is cheap meat.

    Wish I could have gotten an organic one, but they're $2.50/lb and I can't swing that quite yet.
     
  6. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    From what I've heard the stores actually sell the turkeys below cost as a loss leader. Organic producers can't afford to do that. Poults cost about 6 to 8 bucks a piece, then you nearly always lose some of them, then you have the expense of raising them. Turks eat a lot!
     
  7. Paranoid

    Paranoid Homebrewed Happiness

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    yeah there is no way for the little guy to compete.

    however, faced with the rising cost of protein when i see something 57 cents or less for good meat, not "questionable body parts", i am all over the deal.
     
  8. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    Sure, if it is something you will eat. The store birds nearly always are injected with 'broth' these days. MSG and who knows what. I won't eat them myself. LOL
     
  9. Bluecreekrog

    Bluecreekrog Well-Known Member

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    Not to hijack the thread but, would $1.79 a lb be profitable? Thats what fresh, never frozen turkey is selling for at a poultry farm nearby.
     
  10. TnAndy

    TnAndy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    No wonder they are so cheap.....wandering around everywhere in my front yard.

    I'll shoot 'em if you'll pluck 'em.

    [​IMG]
     
  11. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Follow the link to the whole story.
    http://tinyurl.com/dpja2

    One for 'The Birds': Wild turkeys attack people

    By WILLIAM M. BULKELEY
    The Wall Street Journal
    Published November 23, 2005, 10:40 AM CST

    As Americans prepare to eat some 46 million domestic turkeys slaughtered for Thanksgiving, their wild cousins are fighting back. The explosion of the wild-turkey population to nearly seven million from just 30,000 in the 1930s has put a growing number of humans in the face of angry gobblers.

    Patricia Huckery, a Massachusetts Wildlife Department district manager in Acton, west of Boston, says she has gotten 25 calls this year for advice on coping with aggressive turkeys. Last year in Cranford, N.J., a letter carrier killed a turkey with a stick after complaining to police that a flock of turkeys wouldn't let him out of his delivery truck. In Pennsylvania's Montgomery County, wildlife conservation officer Chris Heil says he has had to kill 42 turkeys this year in response to complaints about behavior ranging from attacking a child on a tricycle to scratching cars.

    Last month, jogging on a back road in Massachusetts' Berkshire hills, Betsy Kosheff passed a farmers' field where farm-raised wild turkeys were pecking for grain. Suddenly about 30 of them took off after Ms. Kosheff, who has a public-relations firm in West Stockbridge, Mass.

    "It was like that scene in 'The Birds' except there was no phone booth," says Ms. Kosheff, referring to the famous refuge in the Alfred Hitchcock movie. A passing friend stopped her pickup truck and Ms. Kosheff ran around it several times. The turkeys kept up the chase, although she says "they were too stupid to split up or change directions" to trap her. Finally, Ms. Kosheff got in the truck, where, she says, her friend "was laughing so hard she almost choked on her Dunkin' Donut."



    Copyright © 2005, Chicago Tribune
     
  12. mightybooboo

    mightybooboo Well-Known Member

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    Pony,sounds like those 'gangbanger' squirrels I have here.I had one up in a pinetree and the little bugger was throwing pine cones at me! :nana:

    Another time they blocked off the road heading down the mountain! :nana:

    Yep,theyre fighting back,yes indeedy!

    BooBoo
     
  13. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    Really depends on what the farm's costs were. But I'd say it is a good buy.
     
  14. whodunit

    whodunit Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Yup, meant "freezer burn". The plastic surrounding a typical store bought turkey is vacuum sealed?
     
  15. lewbest

    lewbest Well-Known Member

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    I haven't done it in recent years but used to buy several when stores had them real cheap before thanksgiving & eat them through out the year; always were good even after months of staying frozen in original package.

    Lew
     
  16. Paranoid

    Paranoid Homebrewed Happiness

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    i cant speak for your stores, likely they use a different meat packing plant then mine. but the 3 i have seen so far this year were sealed in high gauge plastic.
     
  17. Grandmotherbear

    Grandmotherbear Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Yes, they are great at other times of the year also. I would roast a small one, freeze half the meat and use the other half for several days menus.
     
  18. ellebeaux

    ellebeaux Well-Known Member

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    Turkeys were $0.19/pound at Harris-Teeter here (dumb name for a grocery, I think). I'm going to cook up and freeze another one since I didn't get to keep the carcass this year. I need my turkey barley soup!
     
  19. mistletoad

    mistletoad Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We paid $1.79 at the local butcher for a fresh (ie no "broth") turkey. They could give away the frozen ones and we still wouldn't eat it. Next year I think we will raise our own or call the organic farm a bit earlier - tried to order in October and it was already too late.
     
  20. sullen

    sullen Question Answerer

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    I am with you, Cy. I still have the one DH's job gave us last year.
    On the otherside, the ones we grew were delicious, DH figured they were a little over $1.00 a lb to raise.