tulip and crocus bulbs

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by suelandress, Oct 26, 2005.

  1. suelandress

    suelandress Windy Island Acres Supporter

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    Can I store these in the frig over winter? Should I keep them dry? moist? above freezing? below? :help:
     
  2. james dilley

    james dilley Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Bottem drawer in the refridgerator,At least thats what the box reads. And they need about90 days in there to produce next year...
     

  3. Pat

    Pat Well-Known Member

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    I used the weeks (which is about the 90 days). Also NO FRUIT in the refigerator during that time.

    I bought a 2nd refigerator I had in a outside shed that I used for drinks etc. in the summer and bulb storage (actually it's the only way you can get most spring bulbs to bloom in zone 8 - 10) in the fall / winter.

    Pat
     
  4. woodspirit

    woodspirit Well-Known Member

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    Hi,
    Tulips and crocus are fall planted, spring flowering bulbs. Garden center and greenhouses put them into cold storage at about 40 degrees to start the roots growing so that they can get them to flower in pots for easter.You could put them in a metal coffee can and if you leave them in there too long the roots will actually burst the metal coffee can. The roots develop in cold and then they bring them out for two weeks into room temp to force the top growth to pop with flowers. If you have summer/fall flowering bulbs they would get planted in the spring. Those could be kept in cold storage for the winter no problem. Keep them dry.
    Since you are in conn. you might try planting them in pots and then planting the pots outside. Keep some mulch on top of them. It sounds like you don't want to plant them yet because you might be moving? If not then just plant them directly in the ground where you want them to grow right now. They need the cold for root development.
     
  5. Abouttime

    Abouttime Well-Known Member

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    I am currently in Fl-moving to WV in January-I have just received as an early Christmas present tulip bulbs from NY-Naturally I don't want to plant them at this house and leave for the new owner. I was thinking of planting half in a container appropriate for moving and "wintering" the others-Considering the time of the move and the fact that they should be planted in fall, any suggestions? Thanks in advance.