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Karaoke Queen
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The truck drivers I know that do like it are totally single, with no family obligations.

Anyone else I know in a relationship, married or with children hate going OTR. Local routes are okay though.

Time away from home seems like the biggest drawback.
 

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I was asking this question of some truck driving friends lately. They all seemd to like it unless they were owner operators. The fuel prices were killing the owner operators. 'Course the fuel prices are steadily dropping now.

As a single guy I've thought about it myself. Be curious to hear what others have to say.
 

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I am currently involved with a truck driver, he's been driving for 30 years and still loves it. He was married for 20 of those years and his wife went with him on any trips that sounded like fun to her, he also took his parents on several long trips with him.

He has a toy poodle that goes with him on the road to keep him company, cell phone and laptop with internet. large flat screen TV in the truck and many truck stops have hook ups for cable.

Right now I am in the process of making my wish list, we are planning 1 trip a month for next year that I will go with him, his company runs the entire US and with a little advance notice are pretty good about sending him where he wants to go.

As with any job, you just have to have the right attitude!

Edited to add... John said it also depends on the company that you run for... ask long time truck drivers thier opinions of various companies... some places are bad about letting you sit for hours while they find you a load coming home, others have it laid out for you the minute you drop one load. Also, know that just starting out puts you bottom of the totem pole, good runs (and trucks) go to the drivers they know well and can trust to arrive on time. So it takes a little bit of time to build up a reputation and start making REAL money and a lot of drivers give up to soon.
 

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i drove over the road for three years and then 9 years local, otr was ok when i was single but i just got married and there is no way i would do it again
 

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I drove flatbed OTR for a year and now drive a fuel tanker daily.

Living on the road stinks (literally), but sometimes you do, have to do what you have to. It was tough on the family, but then a lot of other jobs are, also.

Not too many other jobs out there anymore, where "average Joe" can make $50-75,000 a year.

Not for everybody, but I like it.
 

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What is the pay like for local routes, as compared with long haul otr?
Many of the better paying local jobs, will be looking for a driver, with 2+ years experience.

The rate DKW gave you is about right here also. Depending on the job and the season, there may be a lot of overtime possible, at least that is the way it used to be.
 

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Middle-Aged Delinquent
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Every trucker I know but for a couple complain constantly about not getting paid, etc. I would like to drive trucks, but all I hear are people complaining about it.
 

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.. around Oklahoma local routes are only paying $12 a hour.
Send one of those dudes up to Canada. I need a truck driver in the worst way. I'd pay him $12 an hour to sit on my riding lawnmower and cut my grass when I have nothing else for him to do. I'd pay him twice that when he was driving a truck.

Pete
 

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If I need a Shelter
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I drove OTR Loved it other than being away from my Family.I was usually gone 6 weeks at a time.Get in my Dispatcher was calling couple days trying to get me back out there.

But Iliked waking up in a different part of the country evrery day.

big rockpile
 

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Every trucker I know but for a couple complain constantly about not getting paid, etc. I would like to drive trucks, but all I hear are people complaining about it.

There is an old joke.

What's the difference between a truck driver and a new puppy? Answer. The puppy stops crying after a week.

It can be a lousy job, but so are many others.

Some drivers let every little thing get to them and they become miserable.

Like any other job, it's what you make of it.
 

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Being the wife of an OTR driver who has been driving for 8 years now. Yes it pays well but it is very hard on the wife and children. And yes I know there are jobs out there other than trucking that are hard on the family too. I get that.

But if you love your family at all dont start driving. It is addicting being on the road, and hard to come home and feel like you are "home". The family lives a completely seperate life. Parenting is a nightmare when he is home because I am used to being the only one here. And the list goes on.

But at this point in the economy switching jobs would not be the wisest thing to do. Where he is he has seniority so gets good loads which pay well and he usually doesnt have much "sitting" time as was mentioned above. For now we have to keep things as they are. But if I could convince anyone to not truck I would! Trucking is a life, so you can have a family OR you can truck. I am sure some will argue but in this economy it is the truth, because as we ALL know, if that truck isnt moving it isnt making any money.

Christina
 

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Truck driving covers a lot of different types of driving descriptions. I drive for an LTL freight company. I've posted in the past about job opportunities even for trainees with no experience. LTL is different then truckload or OTR type driving jobs. Check www.truckingboards.com for more info. Right now business isn't exactly booming so it's not a great time to be looking. Like all jobs it has it's ups and downs. There are very few jobs around anywhere that pay as well as driving and fewer that pay as well as LTL. LTL freight is where the union companies are which keeps the pay rate up for the non union companies. I'm home every other day and with seniority will eventually work towards being home every day.
 

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It really depends on the company and the cargo you're hauling. I drove in Toronto and Southern Ontario for 22 years hauling construction equipment and usually loved it. I drove stateside for about three months before deciding I would rather sleep in my own bed at night.

There are good days and bad days like every other job. On a good day I can't think of any other thing I would rather be doing. Nice weather, out on the highway, load sitting just right, I really loved it. Bad days, downtown with an oversize load, fighting idiot car drivers, some days I wanted to throw the keys in the lake and walk away.

I delivered construction equipment and it was hard work, loading, chaining machines, dirty, greasy, loading and unloading in all weather, long days (12+ hours a day, don't get me started on whether it was legal or not), not to mention dangerous. In the last ten years I knew of at least three other drivers that were killed in our industry, including a close friend of mine that was killed in our yard three years ago tomorrow. We laughed at the weenies who went dock to dock, slept in their cabs while being loaded and complained whenever the weather was bad because their nice shiny trucks got dirty. However some days loading in the blowing snow or driving rain I did envy those dock to dock guys, it is nice to be warm and dry sometimes.

It really does depend on the company and the cargo. Getting into something specialized like tankers, dangerous goods, machinery hauling, etc. can pay really well. We had a lot of drivers come and go at our company because it's so hard to find drivers also experienced with equipment and nobody wanted to work our hours, drive downtown or work out in the weather.

I was laid off in February with a good severance package and am now trying to decide if I want to get back into it. I really miss the big trucks but I really don't miss some of the places I had to go. I"m not sure I want the stress again.
 

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I drive for a local company delivering HVAC products. Drive a 26foot straight truck (box). Its like driving a big pickup. Never much over 90 minutes from home so if I ever had to I could get home quick. Usually drive between 160 and 250 miles per day, 8 to maybe 12 hours sometimes. Can have 10 to 20 plus stops.
Pay is $14.50/hr with great benefits. Been here 8 years and have no plans to leave.
I do my tractor stuff, garden farming and racing on the side.
Guess I am overqualified for my job as I do have a class A license and have driven >the big rigs< locally and regionally. Did not really like it though always push, push, push... Course it was NYC and southern New England.
A side benefit of riding around is finding stuff for sale (or even free) around the countryside. I find stuff all the time. Nice having that big truck to haul it back on.
Another benefit if you need a truck (or company van and flat trailer) once in a while on the weekend we can borrow one for our own use.
To sum it up been driving trucks since FFA in high school being a company driver and having owned a variety of trucks myself.
I like driving and the company I work for but some days traffic is horrible (but I get paid by the hr so if it takes longer I make more lol) and I do my share of heavy lifting.
My thoughts. Tom
 

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Received a call from a truck driving friend a couple of days ago. She has driven for the same company for something like 20 years. Company is now down to four company drivers, of which she is 4th in seniority. Company has started to use owner/operators rather than their own drivers and trucks. Expects to get laid off at any time.

She suspects within a year company will simply become a load broker for existing clients.

She is about one-year away from SS retirement age. She has been asking around with other trucking firms but was told none are hiring company drivers.

End of September I was visiting a friend in SW Indiana. While running errands with him he stopped by a small trucking company. Owner was tying down a tarp over a load. If I understood him correctly he told my friend it was only his second load of the month and it was last week of the month.

Doesn't appear to be a good time to try to get into that profession.
 

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Over The Road has it's down sides.... Companies want experinced drivers so it can take you several years to get a job OTR. The companies like swift that hire straight out of driving schools really suck to work for. And you get payed by the mile which means if you are parked for a week waiting for a load back you are not getting payed and you are spending all your money for a hotel and food.

I stopped driving because I saw too many bad wrecks and knew it would be just a matter of time before I was in one. When you drive 200 k miles a year you are bound to have an accident at some point. I have been involed in several where people around me did stupid stuff and I just happend to be in the wrong place at the wrong time. No body hurt bad or killed in any of them.
 
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