Trespassing Hunters

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by sickandtired, Oct 23, 2005.

  1. sickandtired

    sickandtired New Member

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    I have had one hunter arrested. I have a restraining order against him. I'm still having problems with him and other hunters trespassing on my property. I'm told that one reason is that I'm a single female living alone. Well, I have 3 Rottweillers and ammunition I'm not afraid to use, but I would like to be able to walk around my property without the fear of getting shot or harassed. Any ideas? I'm considering putting a sound system in the woods. However, I have over 100 acres. This has turned me into an anti-hunter activist. I think they should all burn in hell after my ordeal.
     
  2. WindowOrMirror

    WindowOrMirror ..where do YOU look? Supporter

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    ... while fun, ain't yours to give... let the Lord deal with that.

    What you CAN do is ensure that your lands have hunters kept off. A restraining order is a good idea, but it enrages some with primal minds.

    I know - here in WI - that if you ask people not to hunt your land (when you've a lot of it) that you'll be talked about in the community for years... and if you don't let the snowmobiles come through... pack it up, you ain't gettin' along with ANYONE.

    I'm not certain that keeping hunters off your 100 acres significantly decreases your risk of getting shot - with modern rifles anyhow... inflaming people might increase the risk. But do remember, it IS YOUR LAND... YOU MAKE THE RULES... except for the zoning, taxes, etc...

    R
     

  3. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

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    .................Will not the sheriff\game warden deal with these trespassers on a violation by violation basis ?? It sounds like that they arrest one time and then You're on you're own . Is this one of those situations where the sheriff shows up 4 hours after he was called , AFter the criminals have already Left ?? fordy... :confused:
     
  4. DrippingSprings

    DrippingSprings In Remembrance

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    I am a hunter and this type thing just doesnt happen that much in the south it seems. I almost always see that it is in northern states in every post about it. Down here if your caught hunting on someone elses property without permission it gets expensive. Sounds to me like the biggest problem you have is the law enforcement. I dont condone the hunters but most people will only do as much as they know they can get away with. I am a hunter myself and I will not tolerat anyone hunting on my property without asking me first. Its called private property for a reason. If they are driving onto your property leave them with four flats. Pour water in the gas tank etc. It will work better than the law anyway. Id like to go to places like yours and Hunt the so called Hunters. I bet I would and could changed their attitudes as they make all hunters look bad.
     
  5. dlangland

    dlangland dlangland

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    What I used to do, and my girls used to laugh...Keep a little notebook or chunk of scratch paper in my truck, leave the keys in it, with the vehicle pointing outward, and take off after them to see if I could catch their license plate # to call in to call in. It's a tough job. Deb
     
  6. JAK

    JAK Well-Known Member

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    A good compromise might be to find some good friends that hunt and ask them how you would go about allowing them to hunt but nobody else. You might mention to them that buck you have in mind for yourself, and the other one or two others. If you want to protect the local deer population also, I am sure you can discuss that as well. They might come up with some pretty creative ideas on dealing with trouble makers if you put it to them that way and problems might just go away. If not, you know who to call to discuss matters. Once you get to know them, and things start working out for them, you might have yourself a couple of regular customers for your baked beans and brown bread in the fall, and that fence that needed fixing might find itself fixed, not that you weren't eventually going to get around to it yourself.

    Working with that much land you have to understand the principle of leverage. If you manage your land properly you should be able to manage hunters yourself the same way you manage your land, by having the hunters take most care of the hunters, and the land take most care of itself. :)
     
  7. SpaceCadet12364

    SpaceCadet12364 Well-Known Member

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    As the previous poster mentioned, if you have friends that hunt, go to them. If you don't know anyone that hunts, what about the possibility of "leasing" hunting rights....for a fee, or a share of the harvest? That way, it should make it less dangerous for you, less hassles I would imagine, and some money in your pocket or meat in your freezer. If you figure out a way to allow some hunting, but with whatever limitations that you set since you are the land owner...it seems like it would be less headaches for you in the long run. Offering to lease land for hunting, I would bet that you get a few takers, and it wouldn't take long I would imagine. Instead of the no trespassing signs, which lots of hunters might ignore....you would have signs on the order of "private hunt club", with contact information for interested parties. Nothing says you have to let everyone that wants to on your land....but with limited access that you choose to grant, it is likely that those you allow will do much of the policing for you. :D
     
  8. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    I have noticed where property is posted and the name on the sign is that of a hunt club there is a tendency for the hunters to honor the sign. Where the sign is signed by an individual the hunters seem to ignore and trespass. When a property is leased and hunted by a club these trespassers are reluctant to confront a bunch of "good ole boys". I suggest you post prolifically and become a hunt club president with you signature. Have you contacted the game warden for your area and given him permission to check hunters without contacting yourself? If not, do that also.
     
  9. starwalker

    starwalker Well-Known Member

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    We have 30 acres down here in TN. We once had a doctor "try" to hunt our place. One day he came up to the house and asked if he could cross the property line to hunt or if a deer he is hunting crosses it can he come get it. NO! I too do not allow hunting. He got kind of huffy with me like it's his "right" to be on my land.

    Yea right. I looked at him with an evil look of my own and simply said.....You know there are a lot of caves around here. I catch you on my land and I'll drop you where you stand. No one will ever find your body. I never heard from him again. I think he was a bit intimidated by a woman with a gun strapped to her hip. ;)

    I knew he was a Surgeon because he looked at a cyst I have on my wrist and told me he was an Orthopedic Surgeon. Make an appointment and he could take care of it. 10 years later I still have the cyst and my hand works just fine. :rolleyes:
     
  10. JAK

    JAK Well-Known Member

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    That's some of the leverage I was taking about. This lady knows all about leverage. :)
     
  11. LindaT_AK

    LindaT_AK Well-Known Member

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    Good morning sick and tired. Is your land posted? We had that problem when we moved to Northern maine. We bought 105 acres with most of it prime hunting. No one had been there for years so the hunters had always came up to hunt, with alot of them on our land.
    We just figured we would deal with it during hunting season as we can not stop them from hunting. The best thing we decided is to befriend what hunters we could and several actually asked if they could hunt way back up on our land. I said yes, but if you get something I would love a few venison steaks or some pheasant or whatever. No problem. I'm not a hunter, but I do eat meat.
    I was a bit nervous about going out and about during hunting, but all in all it wasn't bad at all. They all had to drive up the hillpast our place to get to the hunting, so I always knew when they were back there hunting. I did get some pheasant and some deer meat. No sense in making people very mad as they will most likely hunt there anyways.

    Well I'm no longer in Maine. Sold the place and came back home to Alaska to my place here.
    Linda T.
     
  12. DrippingSprings

    DrippingSprings In Remembrance

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    You have to be careful so YOU dont break the law. In some states it is a law that a hunter can go onto others property to recover shot game. he must leave his weapon OFF the property and in some places notify the property owner.

    While I hunt my own property and dont allow others to without asking it would not bother me at all to have someone walk onto my property to retrieve an animal they had shot as long as they leave the guns off the property and attempt to notify me. I have used my tractor to haul one out for a hunter before. Being a good neighbor you know.
     
  13. starwalker

    starwalker Well-Known Member

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    Thank you.
    Me- I have a husband, I'm not single. BUT- He's was a long haul big rig driver back then. I HAD to and HAVE to care for my children. They were just little back then. My dad (WWII Expert Sharpshooter) taught me to shoot since I was a "youngin".

    Someone trying to get in my house. Your darn right they won't like the consequences. :cool:
    And my animals are part of our family. They are my kids. :)
     
  14. lgslgs

    lgslgs Well-Known Member

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    We wear orange, stock up on gas, and schedule a lot of wood chipper and chain saw work for dear season gun week.

    Lynda
     
  15. Be careful, you did say you was a single woman. Not all women have John Wayne blood in them. JAK does have a good point there but if you do not want any hunting at all then your best bet is to call your county game warden. If these hunters are parking on your land and you see their vehicles then take a picture of their vehicles and their license number down and report it to the game warden. Our state has a hotline you can call and your state may have one also. Record your calls so that if anything isn't done then you could take the case to a higher authority. You will have proof of phone calls and pictures. Doing this should really get the wardens on the ball.

    However, after all of this, you may still have the same problem only with new hunters.
     
  16. ET1 SS

    ET1 SS zone 5 - riverfrontage Supporter

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    Webcams are cheap, get some. post them outside. and record everything.

    I once saw motion-activated water-sprinkler heads. Like motion-activated lights they turn on when something walks inside their scanning area. They are nto marketed anymore, but you could easily rig a motion-activation sensor to control a valve which supplies a sprinkler head. Anyone walking along X path, would get wetted down.

    No harm, no fowl and you could get it on tape.

    If anyone is 'stalking' you, you really need a tape recorder on your telephone too. Radio-shack will help you, so it turns on everytime you pick-up the reciever. You need to document everytime these boneheads come onto your property. One more thing; NEVER NEVER NEVER invite any of 'them' onto your property. They will use that one invite as an excuse ...

    I served as an MP, I have seen things.

    Good luck.
     
  17. kuriakos

    kuriakos Well-Known Member

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    As in most matters, laws vary from state to state, but most places all you have to do is post a sign on your property that says "NO PARKING, VIOLATORS WILL BE TOWED AT OWNER'S EXPENSE." Then if they park there you can just call a tow truck to take their car away. Some companies won't charge anything up front and will just hold the vehicle until the owner pays the towing and storage fees, while other companies will require you to pay the tow fee up front and they will hold the vehicle until the owner has reimbursed you. It's basically the same as a private parking lot at a business. Call any towing company...most will know the laws for impounding vehicles from private property.

    Hopefully just posting the sign will keep them off the property, but if you do have to have a vehicle towed, just be ready to deal with an angry hunter when he gets back to find his truck is gone.
     
  18. bgak47

    bgak47 Well-Known Member

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    I'm very sorry to hear this sickandtired, as I'm a hunter & these people make us all look bad. I hunt on my own property & I only allow friends & neighbors to hunt there. I can only say that you need to keep pressure on your local law enforcement & your game wardens, & you need to be careful. Anyone who would willfully trespass is not a hunter, but a criminal.As someone suggested, you might want to consider contacting some of the other local hunters about this. Whether or not you want to allow anyone to hunt on your property,the Ethical hunters that are your neighbors will be interested in helping you because anyone that is a serious hunter is concerned about property rights because the issue effects all hunters who want access to private land. You might want to try a google search for hunting organizations. There is always someone who spoils things for everyone else. Good luck & stay safe.
     
  19. bretthunting

    bretthunting Well-Known Member

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    i also am a hunter and landowner. the best thing to do is make sure that your land is posted no hunting, then you have good grounds for pressing charges.
     
  20. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We've struggled with trespassers hunting our land, and it's a pain in the drain, that's a royal pain in the drain. One time, a fellow was bow-hunting, and FIL caught him on our property. Guy made some story about losing track of where he was, and that he was following a deer he wasn't sure he'd hit, blah blah blah.

    We posted the land, but that is useless, as some of these jerks just rip the signage down and stomp on it. "I didn't see no signs." Right.

    The (nice) neighbor made a good suggestion: Get the metal signs (yeah, I know they're a bit spendy), and nail them with BIG HONKIN' NAILS to the trees.

    I think chipping/shredding during hunting season is a grand idea. :D

    Pony!