Trespassers are hunting on my land

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by SteveD(TX), Dec 22, 2004.

What would you do about the neighbor?

  1. Confront him nicely and ask him to remove his stuff, and please don't hunt on my land.

  2. The same as above, but with a game warden in tow.

  3. Call the game warden and/or sheriff. Try to have him arrested.

  4. Pull his stuff down and sell it on eBay.

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  1. SteveD(TX)

    SteveD(TX) Well-Known Member

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    We have 18 acres of woods in the country. The property is about 1300 feet deep, and a little over 600 feet wide, with a little half acre "ear" at the front that cuts at an angle over to the road. The biggest bulk of my property lies behind a 5 acre parcel that was vacant until two years ago. I tried to buy it, but apparently the owner sold to a relative. They promptly moved in 3 old, raggedy mobile homes, along with the assorted lawn decorations such as washers, junk cars, trash, etc.. Otherwise, our nearest neighbor is a rancher who has 1800 acres of the most beautiful land anywhere.

    No city limits, no building restrictions, no zoning. So anything goes. While driving down our driveway today, I noticed what appeared to be a white PVC pipe standing on end in the woods. Turned out to be a deer feeder. Closer inspection revealed 3 deer stands, and 5 deer feeders spread over about 2 acres. And all on our property, along with some empty beer cans, etc. All are directly behind his property, but anywhere from about 50 to 250 feet inside my property line. Granted, the line is not well marked, however there is a large hickory tree that serves as my corner, and the feeders and stands are within site of the marker, which is still wrapped with surveyor's tape. Two other markers were placed along this boundary (disappeared), but there is no fence. It is HEAVILY wooded and it would be pretty expensive, and serve no other purpose than to keep the neighbors out.

    To top it off, this guy is a total jerk and a drunk. I've already had one run-in over property lines with him when he started digging a huge hole once within 20 feet of my front gate on our property line (I thought he was putting in a septic). I tried to be nice but he got PO'd about it. (Turns out he just needed some dirt and his buddy came over with a back hoe).

    My wife is livid. My first thought is to just go talk to him, show him the survey and take a compass, measure, etc. and point out the obvious problem But she just wants to call the sheriff or game warden. Another problem - this is our lake house; we don't live there. It would be real easy for someone to come and burn down the house, break in, etc. What would you do....?
     
  2. superduperchickenman

    superduperchickenman Well-Known Member

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    it's hard to hold land if your an absantee landholder.
     

  3. Oilpatch197

    Oilpatch197 Well-Known Member

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    Agreed, you don't actually live there! BIG PROBLEM!!! you can't harass him by target practicing with your AK-47 every morning!!

    so, hmm what would I do? let them hunt.

    Unless you can have somone live there, he is going to hunt on your property.

    I guess all you can do is put up signs.

    It is wrong what he is doing, I agree with that since he knows you don't want his stands on your land, he SHOULD remove them!!

    This is sad tho, whenever you got a retreat like that, it is good to be freindly with the neighbors, because when a crime is committed, they'll be the ones calling the cops, they may not call and it could be months later when you find out somone busted in a window and raided the place. :(
     
  4. Buckrun

    Buckrun Well-Known Member

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    When he is not hunting go drop moth balls in the feeders. Dump human urin or fresh dog droppings around the area. Try to do things that he might not notice that will make his hunting unproductive. He may move on to someone elses property.

    Steve
     
  5. mikell

    mikell Well-Known Member

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    A few years ago a farmer friend of mine let me hunt on his property because no one was allowed to hunt there. By the end of the day he had 7 terrstands for sale in his front yard and I had a nice new one for helping.

    mikell
     
  6. Okie-Dokie

    Okie-Dokie Well-Known Member

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    Get a fence of some kind put up just inside your surveyed property line, preferably a 5 wire barb wire fence. Tell him you will help him get his stuff off your land if he needs help. If he gets huffy, or doesn't do it in a couple days let the local sherriff tell him.
     
  7. Windy in Kansas

    Windy in Kansas In Remembrance

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    Send him a certified letter with delivery confirmation stating that within a certain time period you will be asking a game warden to check for illegal hunting on your property. Simply state that you hope none of his hunting equipment is on your property to indicate illegal hunting activities. Is deer baiting illegal where you live? In many states it is.

    If he does not pick up or sign for the letter simply proceed to notify authorities and ask that the property be checked. Show them where it is and the boundries.

    In all likely hood they may already been wanting to catch this person at illegal activity. At least he sounds like the kind of person that would routinely break game laws or other laws such as trespassing.

    Good luck.
     
  8. j.r. guerra in s. tx.

    j.r. guerra in s. tx. Well-Known Member

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    This really chaps my hide - trespassing is not only illegal, in Texas, it is a felony to knowingly hunt land you do not have permission to hunt.

    http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/texaswater/rivers/finalcommreport.pdf

    I would definitely make the warden aware of this situation - as said above, it is likely this individual may already be under investigation and might be another 'nail in the coffin' for making a case.

    You do stand a chance of your property being violated though - poachers are criminals, and not known to be good sports about having one of 'their honey holes' removed peaceably.
     
  9. Mike in Ohio

    Mike in Ohio Well-Known Member

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    Well, having gone through something similar I guess I'll throw in my 2 cents. I would go over and see the fellow and ask him nicely to remove the treestands and to respect your property. Make sure you post the property properly.

    If there are any issues, don't get into it. Go to the sheriff and report it. Tell them you aren't looking to press charges at this point but that you want the person to stay off your property. If the person made any threats, report that. If the person did make threats make it clear to the sheriff that you will consider the person armed and with ill intent if they come on your property. Ask the sheriff to have a chat with the person (or send the game warden out) and explain things to them.

    The real question is whether you have the stomach to deal with the person if they don't get it.

    Subsequently, all bets are off. Understand that you aren't there all the time and that stupid people can do malicious things.

    I have (hopefully had) this sort of problem with one neighbor and he has had his chances. He knows that if I see him on my land I will consider him armed and with ill intent towards me.

    Again, just my 2 cents and your mileage may vary depending on how willing you are to toe the line compared to the other person.

    Mike
     
  10. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

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    I really don't think this will work in your case.But when I first bought my property,couple months later caught my neighbor camped on my property.Got really bad,I really think he thought he was on his property,but when he realized he wasn't he asked if he could camp there the remaining of the Deer Season,I let him.

    Since then he has got upset over a few things but most part we get along,he don't live on the property,knows I hunt over on him,but I also watch for Brush Fires,keep his Cabin from burning and plant a couple Pine Trees each year for him if I have extra.

    Whats funny is we are both waiting on one or the other to sell out.

    big rockpile
     
  11. boren

    boren Well-Known Member

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    I would go talk to the guy. You obviously don't like him, put that aside. Go out to where the property line in and put of something that you can see out in the woods. Something as simple as the bright pink plastic survey tape. It's about 1" wide, tie it to trees/posts/what have on in little ribbon markers down the line. I don't mean like a fence, just little markers down the line. Then you'll know where the boundry is. I think it might be better than the bright yellow no tresspass signs as it won't **** him off as much, yet it's easy to see and forms a line.

    The go over, be nice and ask him not to hunt on your property, and tell him you've put boundry markers. Hopefully you won't be in for a property lines fight, but you've got a good survey right?

    Last month I went out to hunt a forrest from a local logging company that we have permission to hunt on. We waved at the farmer as we passed him on the county road (2 lane track) into the forrest, he waved back and smiled. Thirty minutes into our hunt I run into a DNR officer, we go over my licenses and he asks me to meet back at the trucks. Turns out the farmer was really annoyed at these "damn people tresspassing all over his property" so he called the DNR who sent out the game wardens. We were doing nothing wrong, we had permission, we were on the right property and the DNR officers apologized for wrecking the afternoons hunt. If he had simply asked when we passed him he would have saved a lot of agrevation on his part, two officers Sunday afternoon and our afternoon out hunting.
     
  12. caballoviejo

    caballoviejo Well-Known Member

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    I don't live on my property but go out to it several times a week. I used to have a few problems with hunters - I'd go out and find them on my land. One day someone had parked on my road entry and blocked me from going in - he wasn't on my land though. I laid on my horn till he came.

    He was very apologetic and turned out to be a volunteer fireman and policeman who really wanted to hunt. I took him into my land and said go ahead an hunt that day. Eventually he asked and I agreed that he could be the sole hunter on my property, no charge, he he followed my rules (nothing difficult).

    Now he protects the place, he runs off other hunters and has the connections or knowledge to make them respect him. He has sole right to hunt my place and cherishes it. This year he asked if he could then put up two tree stands and a blind. Otherwise I can hardly tell when he has been there.

    It has turned out to be a very good arrangement for me. He shoots the beavers when he sees them (once got 3 while I was standing by him) and found my boat once when it had floated up in the brush way accross the lake.

    My point is if you can get one good hunter who wil respect your property and wishes he may jealously guard his own interest in hunting your property.
     
  13. Hermit

    Hermit Active Member

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    caballoviejo,

    This sounds like the wisest idea to me. If you are willing to let someone hunt the land, they may be willing to protect it for you. Don't be afraid to stand up for yourself, just be aware of what the consequences might be.
     
  14. Blu3duk

    Blu3duk Well-Known Member

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    You have several problems that are not easily remidied,

    First you yourself have a problem that you wanted the ground and are upset to a degree that you did not get it, so you are angry towardds your nieghbor <----- no i am not a psychcaristrist but i read Lucy on Charlie Brown alot......

    the serious nature of property violations come from your niebghbors lack of understanding you really dont want hunting on your property. It should be posted as such as defined within the parameters of Texas Law. Not posting property leaves a grtey area open for determination by anyone, should you allow hunting then the post should read "hunting with written permission only" and have your address posted anda phone number as well....in my opinion....

    The fact that this nieghbor, has come onto your property and removed property tells me you will have other things disappear if you just tear down the feeders and tree stands so other measures should be used first, such as the mothballs in and around the feeders might do the trick, but even better is going to a zoo and getting a carton of "tiger poop". A five gallon bucket of poop and water will "paint" a large number of trees and brush around the permieter of your property and around those feeders and keep the deer away on someone elses property, yes the down side is you can no longer shoot a deer off your porch, but then if hunting was supposed to be that easy then it wouldf have to be called slaughter. You might need a fresh application of tiger manure e very few weeks to keep it fresh enough to look [smell] like they are in the area.

    Finally a case of barley pop can go a long way as to making friends and getting to know your nieghbor, after all Almighty God gave us the ingrediants to make such, and the knowledge of how to do it, and keep all weapons away from such imbibing for the first few times you do so.....

    Game wardens are a menace to good neighborly relations, and so are police, so while your visiting make sure first you have a couple of those pocket tape recorders turned on, so you can get all the hapenings on tape if you choose to do a confrontation without barley pop, then you will have a good thing to back up thatv you were trying to be the good nieghbor first, and were the victim of abuse..... in other words dont be a hothead going into it. Love Thy nieghbor and if that dont work call the sheriff.

    William
     
  15. Thumbbuddy

    Thumbbuddy Well-Known Member

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    Since you have your property surveyed and know where your markers are have your lawyer send him a letter asking him to show where his property markers are since their seems to be a problem over corners and if you are not satisified have the lawyer to have the property surveyed again and you will do the same, it will cost him money for survey services and if he wont do it get a court case going and it will cost him more money and maybe the court can make him pay your cost, maybe I don't know how the courts work in this case, maybe someone can shed some light on the subject and we will understand what others can do in cases like this.
     
  16. SouthernThunder

    SouthernThunder Well-Known Member

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    If you don't want to cause any big problems. (granted hes the one who has caused the problem to begin with) Find the property line and drive some tee posts in on 25' centers without any communication with the neighbor. This won't cost you too much and you don't have to even string anything on it because all you are doing is putting up a "no-fly-zone". After a couple of days if his equipment is still on your side of the line call the sheriff or... burn it all to the freakin ground while pumping round after round into it from your BAR 50 caliber rifle, slobbering and yelling like a mad man, and letting your dogs run circles around the proeprty. Hmmm... did I mention I don't have neighbors anymore...
     
  17. Oilpatch197

    Oilpatch197 Well-Known Member

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    Hmm, that reminds me!
    We seem to Forget to LOVE our neighbor.
     
  18. bgak47

    bgak47 Well-Known Member

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    I have 17 acres in SE OK that I don't live on.I have a cabin & I go there to hunt & to stay for weekend vacations, & longer getaways when I can. I've been going there for 20 yrs & I have good neighbors. I have a deer feeder & I usually get my deer there. I have no Real way of knowing about what goes on, on my property when I'm not there, but since no one has tried to break into the cabin, & I haven't seen any signs of tresspass, I have to assume that my neighbors are Honest. I have a logging chain accross the driveway to discourage vehichles.
     
  19. reluctantpatriot

    reluctantpatriot I am good without god.

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    If someone is hunting or trespassing on my land, I have zero respect for them and have no reason to be nice to them. I have had three people shoot at me when I had been polite to them. Now I simply show them that I am arm and explain that the safety is off and I have a round in the chamber and they have until the count of five to decide what they wish to have happen.

    Yes, I am pretty anti-social, but being shot at in the past and having people threaten my life has done that to me. I deal with those who invade my space with extreme prejudice, but am very friendly to my friends and relatives.

    As for what to do with the property, remove it and then either sell it or destroy it. If he gets upset about it, and you have the strength to withstand him, tell him that those items shouldn't have been on your land anyway. And also point out that if anything happens to your property, home or other possessions, you will hold him personally responsible and will take whatever measures you see fit to deal with him. Granted, I suggest these things because I have had to deal with death threats and gunshots for a few years before the problem was finally resolved through a new landowner buying the problem neighbor's property.

    I am also tired of doing the "Christian" thing or the "right" thing because being nice to the offender only encouraged them to do more since they didn't see any resistance and the sheriffs department wouldn't even come out. I now use extreme threat of force as my negotiation tool. That and making it clear that they can end up as coyote food if they keep pushing. The have all the opportunity to back down and leave if they wish. I don't force them to be there. But they do understand that any further problems and I have no qualms about terminating them while they are a threat to me and my property.

    My situation has been more dangerous than yours, so take that into consideration when I state my view. I have had to resort to presentation of deadly force because I have had my life threatened a few too many times. Besides, I really don't care if the small town nearby talks about the crazy homicidal nut who will shoot someone on sight. I have yet to shoot anyone and if that reputation serves as a determent, so be it.
     
  20. Mike in Ohio

    Mike in Ohio Well-Known Member

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    And the YOU part of WE seem to have forgotten "Thou shalt not covet thy neighbors posessions".