Tree w/ small orange fruit??

Discussion in 'Plant and Tree Identification' started by Kstornado11, Oct 25, 2006.

  1. Kstornado11

    Kstornado11 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Anyone know what kind of tree has small, orange colored fruits that sort of resemble tomatoes? Vey large tree, but since the leaves have already fallen, I am at a loss. :shrug:
     
  2. Kstornado11

    Kstornado11 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I found it... it's a Persimmon tree! And the turkeys love 'em! :baby04:
     

  3. swampgirl

    swampgirl Well-Known Member

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    Turkeys! I love 'em. Make a pie with them; very much like pumpkin pie. They have to be ripe first. Use lots of spices & sugar. They can also be eaten when ripe.
     
  4. Zebraman

    Zebraman Well-Known Member

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    Hey Kstornado;Sounds like American Persimmon,They taste Great when they are dead ripe(soft and Squishy).If they are still firm you'll Never eat another one!-
     
  5. Kstornado11

    Kstornado11 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Well, I am trying to figure out how to GET to them, as the tree is HUGE, and we don't have any ladders nearly tall enough. They are starting to ripen, but I fear if they begin to fall, the poultry will beat us to them !! :baby04:
     
  6. Zebraman

    Zebraman Well-Known Member

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    Hey Kstornado11;Any good garden center will sell those wire 'Fruit-Pickers" that you attach to the end of a pole.If its not completely soft don't eat it until it is.Trust Me.-
     
  7. mtman

    mtman Well-Known Member

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    put a tarp under the tree they are better when they fall and after a frost we have 16 of them
     
  8. mary,tx

    mary,tx Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Persimmons store very well just put in a freezer whole. Even if they are picked prematurely, after being in the freezer they will be soft and wonderful when defrosted.

    Last year a friend of my Mom's hurried out and picked all her not-quite-ripe persimmons because it was going to frost. Now, of course, persimmons are best after that first frost, but she didn't know that. Didn't know what to do with them after she picked them, either, so gave a bunch to my Mom, who gave them to me. I stuck them in the freezer, and we have been enjoying wonderful persimmon cake. :)

    As someone else mentioned, don't taste a not-soft persimmon, or you won't want any more. (They are bitter before ripe.)

    mary
     
  9. harrisjnet

    harrisjnet Okie with Attitude

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    Persimmons also make great Jam or preserves.
     
  10. Kstornado11

    Kstornado11 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thanks for all the tips! I have taken your warnings seriously and not dared to taste any quite yet, as they are still pretty firm. We have had a few frosts here already, so I guess now we just wait.... and battle the poultry over them! Maybe I can lure them away w/ the hundreds of walnuts while DH gathers the persimmons.... :baby04:
     
  11. mikee22712

    mikee22712 Member

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    Walnuts they are great to just a lot of work to get them out of shells and hulls
     
  12. PyroDon

    PyroDon Well-Known Member

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    put down tarps or bed sheets and shake the tree .
    mom makes a pudding out of them great stuff but super rich .
    use a pulper to seperate seeds out . When ripe they are very sweet with a dry taste , a bit sriveled and greyish .
     
  13. Kstornado11

    Kstornado11 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I've tried shaking the tree, it doesn't budge! :p I think it's alot stronger than I am. My 3 year old is fascinated by the persimmons, insists I pull an old dog house over under the tree & knock them out w/ a broom handle... but I am no longer able to jump high enough, on top of the dog house, and am afraid I will miss on the way back down & break something, including the persimmons! :help: I think the poultry will win this one. :shrug:
     
  14. PyroDon

    PyroDon Well-Known Member

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    toss a rope up high around it and pull it slightly with the car/truck

    I cheat and put a tire over the loader bucket on the tractor and bump the trees
    ended up with 8 five gallon buckets full last fall
     
  15. suburbanite

    suburbanite Well-Known Member

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    Google 'persimmon' under 'images' first to make sure that is indeed what you have.

    There are two kinds of persimmon, a pointy-acorn shaped one and a roundish flattened one that is a bit like one of those 'donut peaches' in shape. The acorn shaped one is best when it is soft and rather gelatinous inside. The flattish one (Hachiya) is less common and should be eaten when somewhat hard.

    A good web search should give you all the tips you need to make use of your persimmons. I recently heard a convenient way to deal with oversupply of ripe fruit--freeze them. Apparently they freeze to a sherbert-consistency and can be scooped and eaten like ice-cream when frozen.
     
  16. Kstornado11

    Kstornado11 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Well, yesterday the guineas discovered the persimmons, and the turkeys and chickens were standing under the tree, gobbling up what they dropped. They are mostly pretty squishy, over-rioe now.... oh well, the poultry are getting a treat! :rolleyes:
     
  17. RedEarth

    RedEarth Well-Known Member

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    You might want to try one before you call them a loss. The persimons I've seen are really really soft when ripe. Jellyish. Before that they're not so tasty.
     
  18. swamp man

    swamp man Well-Known Member

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    Exactly right.They're really smushy before they're good to eat.Also,they should come off the limb with just the lightest touch.If ya' have to pull on one to harvest it,it's likely not fit to eat.Around here,it usually takes a light frost before they are any good.I climb the tree,and shake it from the top,but PyroDons idea is a good one.Be wary,though.I've gotten stung by saddlebacks several times foolin' around with persimmon trees.They seem to like 'em.
     
  19. sunnygrl

    sunnygrl Well-Known Member

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    what is a saddleback, i did a search and came up with a caterpiller, isthat what you mean, I haven't seen such a thing around here... so was unfamiliar :shrug:
     
  20. countrymouse

    countrymouse Active Member

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    SE Kansas doesn't have the climate to grow those Hachiya persimmons. The fruit of the American persimmon, Diospyros virginiana, are much smaller (actually about the size of an acorn) than their Chinese cousins Diospyros kaki (the big suckers you guys grow out in CA). Some people say the native ones are more flavorful, but I'll leave that up to debate. :)