tree seeds

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Paul Wheaton, Jan 18, 2005.

  1. Paul Wheaton

    Paul Wheaton Well-Known Member

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    Anybody ever done much planting of trees from seeds?

    I found a web site that sells tree seeds, but they seem to have this thing about "Seed requires 60-90 days cold moist stratification" where you coddle the seed for 60-90 days in your fridge before planting. I have to wonder if I just bury it about an inch deep outside in the fall, if that will do the same thing.

    Anybody tried?
     
  2. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    It will do the same thing.
     

  3. Little Quacker in OR

    Little Quacker in OR Well-Known Member

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    :) Keep in mind that most tree types do not "come true"from seeds or nuts. Also, some will rot if put into ground that is too wet and cold at the same time. And, some are meant to pass through a critters system before germinating and they will germinate better with some scaring and roughing up of the surface.

    Then you've got birds, squirrels, gophers and other critters that might love those tree seeds! LOL

    Just some thoughts..If I paid money for them I'd want to keep them safe until spring.

    Have fun..spring is coming, I know it! LOL

    LQ
     
  4. george darby

    george darby Well-Known Member

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    i have had good luck with tree from seed its a cheep way to start with some of the more interesting species that may not be available in your local wooded areas ,potted or bare root seedlings are expensive and many of those you buy are from seed not cuttings ,every species has thier own dormancy requirements many annual and perenial herbacious plants also require stratification /cold treatment/scaring of seed coat a little research and a little time for the seedlings to grow and a high return on your investement can be reached from a pkt of seed to a quantity of seedlings each worth far more than your seed cost ,research on planted nuts show very high rate of rodent loss as compaired to seedling plating in the same enviorment
     
  5. wy_white_wolf

    wy_white_wolf Just howling at the moon

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    What's the website as I seem to have lost the one I had bookmarked?
     
  6. Michael Kawalek

    Michael Kawalek Well-Known Member

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    I have spent a significant amount of money buying tree seeds, but over time I've found local sources for every single tree I was interested in. You'll need to do research into whatever treatment is required. Nut type seeds like walnut or pecan need stratafication, where as honey locust requires soaking in boiling water, and carob needs its seedcoat scarified with sandpaper.

    Do you have a local botanical garden or city park? Those are good places for quantities of seed you can just pick yourself. Is there a college or university nearby? If it's a school that teaches botany or forestry, you are likely to find a large number of species planted for teaching purposes.
    Good hunting,
    Michael
     
  7. RoseGarden

    RoseGarden Well-Known Member

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    Sheffield's Seeds is an online source, I have ordered there many times.

    Overwintering seed in the ground will accomplish the cold stratification as mentioned, but also as mentioned it exposes the seeds to rodents, squirrels, insects etc that can devour the seed before it germinates. Coddling in the refrigerator is often the best policy especially with oaks and other mast bearing trees.
     
  8. vicker

    vicker Well-Known Member

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    put them in damp compost in a ziplock bag and place in the fridge for a few months. They will do great.
     
  9. Jenn

    Jenn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I collected persimmon seed from a local good tasting (astringent!) tree and relatives mailed me seed from grocery store fruit and local fruit in their area. Threw them all into a pit I had from freecycling an unwanted shrub. Pretty soon I'll relocate most of the few dozen twigs all over the place and hope the one I keep there ends up pretty and with nice fruit.

    But that was seed for almost free (postage) by the dozens.
     
  10. Tricky Grama

    Tricky Grama Well-Known Member

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    I have some Eve's Necklace seeds & posted on "Giveaways" to send 2 people some seeds. They do best in zone 7 or below. I will go gather more today & first 5 to PM me w/address I'll send them to you.

    Patty
     
  11. EDDIE BUCK

    EDDIE BUCK Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have planted pecans like that.In the fall, clear out a spot and make a trench, put the pecans in trench and cover.Keep weeded for a couple years then transplant to new location. I think just planting seed here and yonder without keeping the weeds out would be a waste of time. my 2 cent though Eddie
     
  12. Old Vet

    Old Vet In Remembrance

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    I used to work for the Arkansas Forestry Commission at their nursery. You can plaint them now but you will get few plaints. You can store them in your frig and will have more. Use a soil sterilizer to keep the grass down for the first year. Fertilize them well. And keep the area moist all the first year. Then dig them up the next winter and trains plaint them where you want to keep them. Lot of luck. Seeds planted like in the wild are 1% germinated. Seeds planted the way I told you are 90% germinated if they are all good. Plaint them the same distance below the ground as the size of the seed. Small seed are planted shallow and the large seed are planted deep. If your seed is about 1/8 inch then plaint them 1/8 deep. Large nuts need to be planted enough to cover them well. Ask me anything about growing trees from seed and I will answer if possible.