Tree Identification

Discussion in 'Plant and Tree Identification' started by Back2Basix, Aug 11, 2017.

  1. Back2Basix

    Back2Basix Well-Known Member

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    Can't tell you what the leaves look like because they are all standing deadwoods. My property is riddled with them, they seem to be a hardwood, and burn beautifully

    I'm in SW Michigan and it's a pretty wet area if that helps

    20170811_154704.jpg
     
  2. Back2Basix

    Back2Basix Well-Known Member

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  3. mmoetc

    mmoetc Well-Known Member

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  4. Back2Basix

    Back2Basix Well-Known Member

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  5. nate77

    nate77 Well-Known Member

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    Looks like ash to me.

    Our ash trees are also totally devistated here in Indiana.

    Ash is my favorite firewood, it burns great, and is easy to split.
     
  6. Southern Forest

    Southern Forest Member

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    Ash will have opposite-branching. Other trees, such as Yellow Poplar, will have alternate branching. Look at the branches. Do they oppose each other (particularly twigs) or do they alternate from left to right?
     
  7. Back2Basix

    Back2Basix Well-Known Member

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    I think it's ash based on the bark. Tried to look at branching but these are "skeletons" and don't have branches/twigs defined enough to tell

    They've been dead years and years
     
  8. haypoint

    haypoint Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Ash, likely White Ash. When you peal back the bark, you should see the Emerald Ash Borer's S shaped paths. This bug consumes the only living part of an Ash tree's trunk, the cambrem layer, just under the bark. Has killed millions of Ash trees in the past decade since being brought to the US in pallet wood from China.
     
  9. Southern Forest

    Southern Forest Member

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    The borer's give it away as they don't attack Yellow Poplar. The thing about the branches is that the bark on those trees also resembles Yellow Poplar. In any case, we're lucky in the south in that our Green Ash, at least in my area, is not succumbing to invasive attacks. As a forester, I can tell you we're really blessed, even with southern pine beetle taking from time to time. A well-managed forest generally has no problems with insect pests around here. Now timber prices being in the dumps for years is another thing altogether.