Transplanting plants in Nov?

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by insanity, Nov 6, 2005.

  1. insanity

    insanity Well-Known Member

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    Clarksville TN.
    Hope someone can help.We have moved temporailry untill we can find some land to suit us.Anyway the wife says i gotta move some (most) of her plants to. :bash:
    (9 Roses,2 evergreens,2snowball typ bushes,and lord noes how many Hostas
    and Lillys.)Some have been planted for 6 years. :(

    Any way i need to no what i can transplant, and what i might need to plant in buckets for now.Someone had told her not to transplant things after the first frost.Just plant them in buckets.But my delima is do they need light,heat,water? I can put a few in my shed but i dont want to have a huge light bill from heating it.Im asuming they would just need to stay above freezeing?Humm im really lost.And shes going to kill me if i kill them. :D
    Anything that can be transplanted, can be moved to my grandmothers.She will be glad to have them, and ill be glad not to have to move them again. :rolleyes:

    Oh and im in middle TN.Zone? Temp has been running Low 30,s to high 70,s Several light frost all ready.But one or two roses still have blooms.
     
  2. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Pot the plants. You can use a sheltered area, like next to a building. Surround the plants with bales of straw, and cover the top. The roots will freeze too hard if you just leave them in pots. The straw acts as insulation, much the way the ground would if you'd left them where they were.

    If you put them inside, do not heat the building. An unheated basement would probably keep the right temp. They will not need light, they are going dormant. If the building is going to be as cold as the outside, you might want to bunch them together and treat them as though they are outside, with some sort of insulation around them.
     

  3. Farmer Willy

    Farmer Willy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'd go ahead and transplant them NOW. You have a while before the grouond will freeze in Central TN. This is when trees and shrubs put out new root growth. The tops might look cooked but good stuff is going on underground. I'll be putting in holly, apple and cherry next weekend. Make sure they get a good soaking in. Don't delay on it, you want root growth before the ground freezes. If Mother Nature doesn't want to cooperate and sends cold weather early thickly mound the plants with mulch, it will give them a little extra time to settle in. If you do, make sure to get it off in early spring before new growth breaks.
     
  4. suelandress

    suelandress Windy Island Acres Supporter

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    I'm still planting stuff here in northeast connecticut. anything I don't get to will be in the garage for the winter. Next week will bring really low night temps, but the day time temps are high enough that the ground won't freeze yet for a while. Presumably, your plants are dormant at this point anyway?
     
  5. woodspirit

    woodspirit Well-Known Member

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    The evergreens will have the hardest time of it so keep them hydrated with lots of water and use an anti-transpirant like wilt-pruf. You could also spray the foliage with vegetable oil and that will prevent the loss of water from the needles. Mulch everything well. good luck and have fun.