traditional wood working

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by cowboy joe, Dec 10, 2004.

  1. cowboy joe

    cowboy joe Hired Hand

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    Any other traditional wood workers out there? Power tools have there place but what I really enjoy is creating simple, functional pieces without the whine of the saw. It's been quite a while since I've done any type of traditional wood working. I have plans drawn up for a new shaving horse & a work bench. Most of my tools are gone (read that as I'm divorced...bet you can figure out where they went) so I'm starting over. I rummaged through my grandfather's old tool boxes and was able to come up with some auger bits, planes, hand saws and the like. They've been sitting in my Dad's garage since my grampa passed many years ago. They need to be cleaned & sharpened but I couldn't ask for better as they remind me of time spent in my grampa's shop when I was a kid.

    I have an older planer blade that I am using for a draw knife. It works for now but I would like to get myself a better one. I've checked the internet but it is always hard to judge the quality of a tool without holding it in your hands. Any recommendations? I'm looking for both a curved & flat bladed knife. Any links to good websites would also be appreciated.
     
  2. jackie c

    jackie c Well-Known Member

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    Lee Valley Tools has a great selection of hand tools, and their mail-order to boot.
    Its excellent quality stuff, I can vouch for that. Here's their web site,

    www.leevalley.com


    ps woould you mind sharing your plans for the shave horse, I make peeled diamond willow stuff and desparately need one! :eek:
     

  3. cowboy joe

    cowboy joe Hired Hand

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    Thanks for the link to Lee Valley Tools...lots of great hand tools! I feel like a kid in a candy shop.

    The shaving horse was designed by a gentleman named John Alexander. He has plans for an end vice pole lathe on the site too.

    http://www.greenwoodworking.com/shorse.htm

    Thanks again.
     
  4. Bob_W_in_NM

    Bob_W_in_NM Well-Known Member

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    Ever catch "The Woodwright's Shop", with Roy Underhill on PBS television? I watch it sometimes and really enjoy it.

    The show's web site URL is:

    http://www.pbs.org/wws/

    There's some good links to go to from there.
     
  5. reitenger

    reitenger Well-Known Member

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    I am a big fan of any woodworking that is more hands on. I started college as a fine woodworking major in Colorado at Red Rocks Community College. They had a lot of classes in the department. One of my favorite classes was making hand planes. We are in the middle of moving onto our new homestead in MO, but I will be more than happy to share anything I can along these lines when I get settled. I have also gotten into reading everything I can about Japanese woodworking as it is still a very hands on process. If you are able to spend some time away from NY, you might check out the Ozark Folk Center in Arkansas. They have hands on classes each spring.
     
  6. jackie c

    jackie c Well-Known Member

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    Oh thank you so much for the site Cowboy Joe, its gonna be alot easier peeling those sticks now. :worship:
    I have bought something from Lee Valley called the Veritas Power Tenon Cutter. A little pricey, but worth it. I know its a power tool, but its awsome!
    I agree with the candy store thing, I get a catalouge every year, and, well, everything I want adds up to about 7-800 bucks worth, a definate wish only list!
     
  7. cowboy joe

    cowboy joe Hired Hand

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    The Woodwrights Shop is one of my favorite shows. Roy Underhill is very talented.

    I started work on my workbench yesterday. I was fortunate enough to find a copy of The Workbench Book by Scott Landis at the public library. There is a great chapter dedicated to japenese wood working. I was amazed how the Japenese use their feet to hold the workpiece. Lots of great ideas in the book...good reading if you have the chance.

    Cash is short so I opted to model my workbench after a unit built by Bob & David Keys out of 2x4s rather than hardwood:

    http://www.terraclavis.com/bws/beginners.htm

    The unit is functional and should provide better support than the paint cans and old door I am currently using. Jackie C...I know the feeling...almost felt like using my teeth to hold some of the poles would have been a better option!

    I was very disappointed with the selection of local lumber. The 2x lumber was all knotted and warped. The knots were not just cosmetic, some went right through while others were large enough to cause concern. It took me almost 30 minutes to find 10, decent boards for the base.

    I've opted to build the entire bench with only hand tools. The bench doesnt have to be pretty as long as it is structurally sound. Good thing...I'm real rusty after a few years of inactivity. I thought it would be a good opportunity to access the condition of my handtools too. Needless to say, most of my chisels & saws are in desperate need of an edge!

    The legs and a few of the stringers are cut and glued up in the basement. I cut the mortises for the main stretchers but probably won't get to the rest until next weekend...figure my time is better spent sharpen my chisels, saws & bits before continuing.