Tractor wheels (Farmall)

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by Dreams30, Feb 17, 2005.

  1. Dreams30

    Dreams30 Lady Rider

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    We have an opportunity to purchase an OLD farmall tractor which still runs. I am concerned about the front wheels on the front that are so close together and can cause it to turn over easily.

    Does anyone know if it can be fitted with a wide axle for the front wheels. I know that this is not "restoring" it. I am looking to use it if I can make it safe to use.

    By the way, does anyone know what year they stopped making them with the front wheels that close together?

    [​IMG] This is what I mean
    [​IMG] This is how it is.
     
  2. RyleeM

    RyleeM Active Member

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    It should work okay... Just make sure the wf(wide front axel) you get is very sturdy, as they tend to be much weaker(per husband). As far as stability, once you have a wf on the tractor, it will steer much better as well as be more stable.

    I have a 706 wide front farmall that I just bought at a very good price. What are you paying for this M?
     

  3. Dreams30

    Dreams30 Lady Rider

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    He is asking 2,500 but, it comes with a brushhog and other attachments. Runs good.
     
  4. opus

    opus Well-Known Member

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    You'll pay a lot for a wf end. Super M was my #1 tractor for a lot of years! Wish I still had it.

    Biggest issue with them is the poor hydraulics, and no brakes. It cost quite a bit for a new pump.

    Nice looking piece of steel!!
     
  5. HermitJohn

    HermitJohn Well-Known Member

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    There used to be aftermarket wide front kits for these. If they still exist, suspect they would be pricey new just like aftermarket 3pt hitch kits. Might find used one though at some tractor salvage place. You can also custom make one. Wide front is nicer with loader. Wont be that much more stable on a tall row crop type tractor though. What causes the instability is a high center of gravity. Just the nature of a row crop tractor whether tricycle or wide front. They were designed that way with axles high off ground so they could be used to cultivate crops even at a larger stage of growth without breaking or bending the tops of the plants. A narrow front end went between rows. A wide front would bend the plants. Multiple mechanical cultivations were used to keep weeds down before the super heavy applications of herbicides became popular. Same with harvesting. Trying to remember but there was a utility version of the H and the M. Think utility H was called something like W4 and M a W6. Or maybe the W6 was utility version of SuperH? Not absolutely sure anymore and too lazy to go look it up. Didnt see utility versions much in farming area I grew up in. The utility versions of these row crop tractors came with wide front AND designed with a lower center of gravity like modern utility tractors.
     
  6. opus

    opus Well-Known Member

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    I had one of those aftermaket front ends. I would advise on spending the moeny and getting a factory one. The aftermarket stuck out about a foot in front of the tractor. It put a lot of undo stress on the front end.

    I believe the Schwartz front end was a good one though.
     
  7. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    You're looking at a couple of thousand dollars for the parts, so you'd be better off just finding a tractor that has a wide front end. These narrow ones aren't all bad, you just have to use common sence. You find local tractor wreckers on the Fastrac site HERE Click their parts button and the state your in/near to find the contact details.
     
  8. HermitJohn

    HermitJohn Well-Known Member

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    If cost is an issue, I have seen some wide front ends for tractor fabricated out of front solid beam axle from a truck. Not elegant but functional. If you have some talent welding not too hard to just copy the factory type wide front.
     
  9. milkstoolcowboy

    milkstoolcowboy Farmer

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    Well, if it's a straight M it doesn't have live PTO and from the picture it sure doesn't look like it has a 3-pt. hitch.

    Only the Super M-TA had live PTO from the factory.

    You can find some after-market hand clutch that mounts over the left-brake housing that would get you live PTO. I believe M&W was the original manufacturer that made those after-market clutches, they are hard to find now.

    A good after-market 3-pt. will run $700-$900 new.

    My 1954 Super M has a factory engine-driven hydraulic pump (live hydraulics). I think if you install this after-market it will run you a fair bit more, depending on if you can find used parts.

    Schwartz made an after-market WF, others were not as beefy. You don't see a lot

    My opinion: Straight M for $2500 is no bargain. Super M I'd be interested. I bought my Super M at a neighbor's auction in 1956 and I still use it, but mainly for grinding feed. I used to disk with it, seed oats, plant corn, cultivate, pull the crimper, pull loads of sileage, put the corn picker on it, pull the manure spreader, run the elevator and augers. You get the idea, it's a great tractor, but if you only have one tractor, you might want to get a diesel, WF, live PTO and hydraulics.

    I wouldn't worry about the narrow front tipping over so easy, but you'll get a little exercise turning it.
     
  10. LisaT

    LisaT Well-Known Member

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    There is a place in Kansas called the Steel Wheel Ranch. Has about anything you could want for an old tractor. Specifically John Deere and Farmall. I restored and old M and was able to purchase everything from him. He has a website just can't remember it right now. On the subject of a widefront, a friend of mine had taken the steer axle off of a combine and put it under the front of a farmall H. Worked pretty good except when you would jam the clutch in you would lose your steering. The Alternative to this is to get the pump which mounts under the distributor and is "Live" then.

    Theront
     
  11. Beeman

    Beeman Well-Known Member

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    What do you want to use this tractor for? It would be great as a show piece for parades and will do some simple chores. To use this for a main tractor for a farm might not be worth it.
     
  12. opus

    opus Well-Known Member

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    I paid $1700 for a '52 Super M about 20 yrs ago. It was top shape mechanically. Needed paint otherwise.

    52 HP on the dyno. :O)

    If that helps you any.....
     
  13. LisaT

    LisaT Well-Known Member

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    just did some searching online steelwheelranch.com has a nice website now. They even have a tractor forum on their site. Also great links to other tractor sites.

    Theront
     
  14. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have a narrow front H and a (factory) wide front 300 - which are about the same tractor as you are looking at, H is smaller, 300 is the newer replacement.

    I have a loader on the H, have loaded manure for decades with it. It only has the belly pump, not live, so not a great loader tractor, but works. You can make any of these old long-wheelbase narrow front tractors quite stable with weight on the rear end. I know this topica lways brings up a lot of debate, but there actually is very little difference between narrow or wide front - the wide front still has a kingpin in the front axle, so it will pivot on one point up front _anyhow_, little difference. Wide front will steer better. The stability issue has been _way_ overstated. Set the rear wheels wide, add fluid and/or wheel weights, and you will be far more stable than just adding a wide front.

    My 300 factory wide front does not turn very short. Would not like it for a loader tractor.

    I do have an after-market Schwartz wide front on my Ford tractor - good sturdy wide front. Like it. I was at an auction last week & there was a NOS wide front for a IHC 666 tractor (and others) that sold for $800. It will not be cheap to convert. That company does not exactly exsist any more - I believe the reminats of the Minnesota comapny are now owned by a SD company.

    You can also find them at tractor bone yards. Get a used front end from a junk tractor.

    The M can have a distributor hyd pump put on it, that would give it live hyd flow, much better. Again will be close to $1000 to get all set up. The one in your pic does not have this.

    Narrow fronts were made into the '70s I believe. Were needed for corn pickers and other such implements.

    --->Paul
     
  15. jeffinmaine

    jeffinmaine Member

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    To answer your question.....

    The narrow front tractors were primarily row crop tractors, and they are not as unstable as they may appear. I've used many, and on steep hills without a problem.

    Narrow fronts were available into the 1970's though by then they were rapidly decreasing in number.

    Jeff