Toxic Plants

Discussion in 'Working and Companion Animals' started by GoldenMom, Jun 1, 2005.

  1. GoldenMom

    GoldenMom Well-Known Member

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    The following is a partial list of the dangerous types of plants (common names). Please note this list is not all-inclusive.
    Amarylis-bulbs
    Angel Trumpet-all
    Autumn crocus-bulbs
    Azalea-all
    Bittersweet-leaves and fruit
    Black locust-bark, green growth, and seeds from Robinia
    Boxwood-all
    Buckthorn-all
    Buttercup (Ranunculus)-all top growth
    Caladium-all
    Chinaberry-berries, flowers and leaves
    Chinese Lantern-all
    Chrysanthemum-all
    Corydalis species-top growth and corms
    Creeping Charlie-all
    Daffodil-bulbs
    Daphne species and other heath family shrubs-all
    Death camas-bulbs
    Delphinium-all
    Dicentra (bleeding heart)-top growth and corms
    Dieffenbachia-all
    Digitalis_see foxglove
    Eggplant-green growth and sprouts
    Elephant ear plant
    English ivy-berries and leaves
    Foxglove-leaf and seeds
    Geranium-all
    Gladiolus-all
    Ground cherry-green growth and sprouts
    Holly-all
    Horse beans-seeds
    Horse chestnut-flower, sprout and seeds
    Hyacinth-bulbs
    Hydrangea-all
    Iris-all
    Jerusalem cherry-leaf and unripe fruit
    Jimsonweed (Datura)-all
    Jonquil-bulbs
    Larkspur-flowers and seeds
    Lily of the valley-all
    Loco weed-seeds
    Lupine-seeds
    May apple (Podophyllum)-roots
    Mistletoe-all
    Monkshood (Aconitum)-all
    Mushrooms-all of certain types
    Narcissus-all
    Nightshade (Solanum species)-all
    Oleander (Nerium species)-all
    Peony-roots
    Philodendron-all
    Poinsettia-leaves
    Pokeweed (Phytolacca)-roots
    Potato-sprouts, vines, unripe tubers
    Privet-all
    Rosary pea (Abus precatorius)-seed/pea
    Rhododendron-all
    Rhubarb-roots and leaves
    Star of Bethlehem-bulbs
    Tomato-green growth and sprouts
    Trumpet lily-all
    Tulip-bulbs
    Vinca vine-all
    Wandering Jew-leaf
    Wisteria-seeds
    Yew (Taxus)-all

    For more information on these plants and the signs associated with ingestion of these plants, please visit www.aspca.org/apcc.
     
  2. GoldenMom

    GoldenMom Well-Known Member

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    List of Non-Toxic Plants (A-L)
    This list contains plants that have not been reported as having systemic effects on animals or as having intense effects on the gastrointestinal tract. Any plant material ingested by an animal (as when dogs and cats ingest yard grass) may produce signs of vomiting, depression, or diarrhea. These signs are generally mild and self-limiting and often do not require any treatment. Please note that the information contained in our plant lists is not meant to be all-inclusive, but rather a compilation of the most frequently encountered plants.

    A
    Achira
    Acorn squash
    African violet
    Algaroba
    Aluminum plant
    Alumroot
    American rubber
    Anthericum comosum
    Antirrhinum multiflorum
    Arabian gentian
    Aregelia
    Artillery plant
    Aspidium falcatum
    Aubepine
    Autumn olive
    B
    Bachelors buttons
    Ball fern
    Bamboo
    Bamboo palm
    Bamboo vine
    Banana
    Banana squash
    Begonia species
    Belmore sentry palm
    Big shellbark hickory
    Bitter pecan
    Bitternut
    Black haw
    Black hawthorn
    Blaspheme vine
    Bloodleaf
    Blooming sally
    Bluebottle
    Blue bead
    Blue daisy
    Blue echeveria
    Blue-dicks
    Blue-eyed daisy
    Blunt leaf peperomia
    Blushing bromeliad
    Bold sword fern
    Boston fern
    Bottlebrush
    Bottle Palm
    Brazilian orchid
    Bride's bonnet
    Bristly greenbrier
    Broom hickory
    Brodiaea pulchella
    Butterfly ginger
    Butterfly iris
    Bullbrier
    Bur gourd
    Burro's tail
    Buttercup squash
    Butterfly squash
    C
    Caeroba
    Calathea insignis
    Calthea lancifolia
    California pitcher plant
    Callistemon bradyandrus
    Callistemon viminalis
    Callistemon citrinus
    Calochortus nuttalli
    Camellia
    Canada hemlock
    Canary date palm
    Candle plant
    Candycorn plant
    Canna lily
    Cantebury-bell
    Cape jasmine
    Cape primrose
    Carob
    Carob tree
    Caroba
    Carobinha
    Carolina hemlock
    Carrion flower
    Carrot flower
    Carrot fern
    Casaba melon
    Cast Iron plant
    Cat brier
    Cat ear
    Cattleya labiata
    Celosia globosa
    Celosia plumosa
    Celosia spicata
    Chamaedorean
    Chaparral
    Chenille plant
    Chestnut
    Chicken-gizzard
    Chickens and hens
    Chin-lao-shu
    China aster
    China root
    Chinese plumbago
    Chlorophytum
    Chlorophytum bechetii
    Chocolate soldier
    Christmas dagger
    Christmas palm
    Christmas orchid
    Cinnamon
    Cinquefoil
    Cirrhopetalum
    Clearweed
    Cliff brake
    Cocks comb
    Cocktail orchid
    Collinia elegans
    Color-band
    Columnar
    Common camellia
    Common catbrier
    Common garden canna
    Common greenbrier
    Common snapdragon
    Common staghorn fern
    Confederate jasmine
    Coolwort
    Copperlead
    Copper rose
    Coralardisia
    Coral bells
    Coralberry
    Cornflower
    Crape myrtle
    Crataegus phaenopyrum
    Crataegus spp.
    Creeping charlie
    Creeping gloxinia
    Creeping mahonia
    Creeping pilea
    Creeping rubus
    Creeping zinnia
    Crepe myrtle
    Crimson bottlebush
    Crimson cup
    Crisped feather fern
    Crossandra
    Cucumber
    Cushon aloe
    Cushion moss
    Cyrtudeira reptans
    D
    Dainty
    Dainty rabbits-foot fern
    Dallas fern
    Dancing doll orchid
    Davallia bullata mariessi
    Davallia trichomanoides
    Desert trumpet
    Dichelostemma
    Dichorisandra reginae
    Dinteranthus vanzylii
    Duffii fern
    Duffy fern
    Dwarf date palm
    Dwarf feather fern
    Dwarf palm
    Dwarf Rose-Stripe Star
    Dwarf royal palm
    Dwarf whitman fern
    E
    Earth star
    Easter cattleya
    Easter daisy
    Easter lily cactus
    Easter orchid
    Edible banana
    Elephant-Ear Begonia
    Emerald ripple peperomia
    English hawthorn
    Epidendrum atropurpeum
    Epidendrum ibaguense
    Epidendrum
    Episcia spp.
    F
    False aralia
    Fairy fountain
    Fan tufted palm
    Feather fern
    Feathered amaranth
    Fiery reed orchid
    Fig leaf gourd
    Figleaf palm
    Fingernail plant
    Fire weed
    Fish tail fern
    Flame african violet
    Flame of the woods
    Flame violet
    Florida butter-fly orchid
    Fluffy ruffles
    Forster sentry palm
    Fortunes palm
    Freckle face
    Friendship plant
    Frosty
    G
    Garden marigold
    Garden snapdragon
    German violet
    Gherkins
    Ghost leafless orchid
    Ghost plant
    Giant aster
    Giant holly fern
    Giant white inch plant
    Gibasis geniculata
    Globe thistle
    Gloxinia
    Gold bloom
    Gold-fish plant
    Golden bells
    Golden lace orchid
    Golden shower orchid
    Good luck palm
    Grape hyacinth
    Grape Ivy
    Great willow herb
    Green ripple peperomia
    Greenbrier
    H
    Hagbrier
    Hardy baby tears
    Hardy gloxinia
    Haws
    Haws apple
    Haworthia
    Hawthorn
    Hedgehog gourd
    Hellfetter
    Hemlock tree
    Hen and chickens fern
    Hens and chickens
    Hickory
    Hindu rope plant
    Holligold
    Holly fern
    Hollyhock
    Honey locust
    Honey plant
    Honeydew melons
    Honeysuckle fuchsia
    Hookera pulchella
    Horse brier
    Hoya carnosa 'exotica'
    Hoya carnosa 'krinkle'
    Hoya carnosa 'variegata'
    Hoya 'Mauna Loa'
    Hubbard squash
    Hypocyrta spp.
    I
    Ice plant
    Imbricata sword fern
    Irish moss
    Iron cross begonia
    Iron tree
    Ivy peperomia
    Ivy-leaf peperomia
    J
    Jackson brier
    Jacob's ladder
    Japanese aralia
    Japanese holly fern
    Japanese moss
    Japanese pittosporum
    Jasmine
    Jewel orchid
    Joseph's coat
    Jungle geranium
    K
    Kaempferis
    Kahali ginger
    Kenilworth ivy
    Kentia palm
    Kenya palm
    Kenya violet
    Kharoub
    King nut
    King of the forest
    King and queen fern
    Kuang-yen- pa-hsieh
    L
    Lace flower vine
    Lace orchid
    Ladies ear drops
    Lady lou
    Lady palm
    Lagerstroemia indica
    Lance Pleumele
    Large
    Lady Palm
    Laurel-leaved greenbrier
    Leather peperomia
    Leng-fen tu'an
    Leopard lily
    Leopard orchid
    Lesser snapdragon
    Lily of the valley orchid
    Linden
    Lipstick plant
    Little zebra plant
    Little fantasy peperomia
    Living rock cactus
    Living stones
    Locust pods
    Lou-lang-t'ou
    Luther
     

  3. GoldenMom

    GoldenMom Well-Known Member

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    List of Non-Toxic Plants (M-Z)
    M
    Madagascar jasmine
    Magnolia bush
    Mahonia aquifolium
    Malabar gourd
    Malaysian dracaema
    Manila palm
    Mapleleaf begonia
    Maranta
    Marbled fingernail
    Mariposa lily
    Maroon
    Mary-bud
    Measles plant
    Melons
    Metallic peperomia
    Metallic leaf begonia
    Mexican firecracker
    Mexican rosettes
    Mexican snowballs
    Miniature date palm
    Minature fish tail
    Minature maranta
    Minature marble plant
    Mistletoe cactus
    Mockernut hickory
    Mosaic plant
    Mosiac vase
    Moss agate
    Moss campion
    Moss fern
    Moss phlox
    Moss rose
    Mossy campion
    Mother fern
    Mother spleenwort
    Mother of pearl
    Mountain camellia
    Mountain grape
    Mulberry bush greenbrier
    Mulberry tree
    Musa paradisiaca
    Muscari armeniacum
    Muscari spp.
    Muskmellon
    N
    Narrow leafed pleomele
    Natal plum
    Neanthe bella palm
    Nematanthus spp.
    Neanthebella
    Neoregelia
    Nephrolepsis
    Nerve plant
    New silver and bronze
    Night blooming cereus
    O
    Odontoglossum spp.
    Old man cactus
    Old world orchid
    Orange star
    Oregon grape
    Ossifragi vase
    P
    Paddys wig
    Painted lady
    Palm lily
    Pampus grass
    Panamiga
    Pansy orchid
    Paradise palm
    Parlor palm
    Parlor plant
    Parsley fern
    Peace begonia
    Peacock plant
    Pearl plant
    Pearly dots
    Peperomia hederifolia
    Peperomia peltifolia
    Peperomia rotundifolia
    Peperomia sandersii
    Pepper face
    Persian violet
    Pheasant plant
    Piggy back plant
    Pigmy date palm
    Pignut
    Pignut hickory
    Pilea microphylla
    Pilea mucosa
    Pink Brocade
    Pink Pearl
    Pink polka dot plant
    Pink starlite
    Pirliteiro
    Pitaya
    Plantanus orientalis
    Plantanus occidentalis
    Platinum peperomia
    Platycerium alicicorne
    Plumbago larpentiae
    Plush plant
    Polka dot plant
    Polystichum falcatum
    Pony tail
    Porcelain flower
    Pot marigold
    Prairie lily
    Prairie snowball
    Prayer plant
    Prickly bottlebrush
    Prostrate coleus
    Purple baby tears
    Purple passion vine
    Purple waffle plant
    Purpleosier willow
    Q
    Queen's spiderwort
    Queencup
    Queens spiderwort
    Queensland arrowroot
    R
    Rabbits foot fern
    Rainbow orchid
    Red african violet
    Red berried greenbrier
    Red edge peperomia
    Red hawthorne
    Red palm lily
    Red veined prayer
    Reed palm
    Resurrection lily
    Rex begonia
    Rhynchophorum
    Ribbon plant (Chlorophytum comosum)
    Roosevelt fern
    Royal velvet plant
    Rubber plant, baby
    Russian olive
    S
    Saffron spike zebra
    Saint Bernards lily
    Sand lily
    Sand verbena
    Satin pellionia
    Sawbrier
    Scabious
    Scarborough lily
    Scarlet orchid
    Scarlet sage
    Sego lily
    Shagbark hickory
    Shan ku'ei-lai
    Shellbark hickory
    Shiny leaf smilax
    Shrimp cactus
    Silver bell
    Silver berry
    Silver heart
    Silver-leaf peperomia
    Silver nerve plant
    Silver pink vine
    Silver star
    Silver table fern
    Silver tree anamiga
    Slender deutzia
    Small fruited hickory
    Smilax tamnoides vas
    Speckled wood lily
    Spice orchid
    Spider ivy
    Spider plant
    Spotted laurel
    Squarenut
    Squirrels foot fern
    Star jasmine
    Star lily
    Star plant
    Star tulip
    Star window plant
    Strawberry
    Striped blushing
    Sugar pods
    Sulfur flower
    Summer hyacinth
    Swedish ivy
    Sweetheart hoya
    Sweetheart peperomia
    Sweet william
    Sword fern
    T
    Tahitian bridal veil
    Tailed orchid
    Tall feather fern
    Tall mahonia
    Teasel gourd
    Texas sage
    Thea japonica
    Thimble cactus
    Thorn apple (Carateagus oxyacanth)
    Ti hu-ling
    Tiger orchid
    Toad spotted cactus
    Torch lily
    Tous-les-mois
    Trailing peperomia
    Tree cactus
    Tree gloxinia
    Tropical moss
    True cantalope
    Tu fu-ling
    Tulip poplar
    Tulip tree
    Turban squash
    Turf lily
    U
    Umbrella plant
    Urbinia agavoides
    Usambara violet
    V
    Variegated laurel
    Variegated oval leaf peperomia
    Variegated philodendron leaf
    Variegated wandering jew
    Variegated wax plant
    Velvet plant
    Venus fly trap
    Verona fern
    Verona lace fern
    Vining peperomia
    Violet slipper gloxinia
    W
    Waffle plant
    Walking anthericum
    Washington hawthorn
    Water hickory
    Watermelon begonia
    Watermelon peperomia
    Watermelon pilea
    Wax plant
    Wax rosette
    Weeping bottlebrush
    Weeping sergeant hemlock
    Weisdornbluten
    West indian gherkin
    Western sword
    White ginger
    White edged swedish ivy
    White heart hickory
    Whitman fern
    Wild buckwheat
    Wild buckwheat
    Wild hyacinth
    Wild lantana
    Wild sarsaparilla
    Wild strawberry
    Willow herb
    Windmill palm
    Winter cattleya
    Withered snapdragon
    Woolflower
    Y
    Yellow bloodleaf
    Yellow-flowered gourd
    Yerba linda
    Z
    Zebra haworthia
    Zebra plant
    Zinnia sp.
    Zucchini squash
     
  4. GoldenMom

    GoldenMom Well-Known Member

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    Ten Tips for a Poison-Safe Household
    1. Be aware of the plants you have in your house and in your pet's yard. The ingestion of azalea, oleander, mistletoe, sago palm, Easter lily, or yew plant material, by an animal, could be fatal.
    2. When cleaning your house, never allow your pet access to the area where cleaning agents are used or stored. Cleaning agents have a variety of properties. Some may only cause a mild stomach upset, while others could cause severe burns of the tongue, mouth, and stomach.
    3. When using rat or mouse baits, ant or roach traps, or snail and slug baits, place the products in areas that are inaccessible to your animals. Most baits contain sweet smelling inert ingredients, such as jelly, peanut butter, and sugars, which can be very attractive to your pet.
    4. Never give your animal any medications unless under the direction of your veterinarian. Many medications that are used safely in humans can be deadly when used inappropriately. One extra strength acetaminophen tablet (500mg) can kill a seven-pound cat.
    5. Keep all prescription and over the counter drugs out of your pets' reach, preferably in closed cabinets. Pain killers, cold medicines, anti-cancer drugs, antidepressants, vitamins, and diet pills are common examples of human medication that could be potentially lethal even in small dosages. One regular strength ibuprofen (200mg) could cause stomach ulcers in a ten-pound dog.
    6. Never leave chocolates unattended. Approximately one-half ounce or less of baking chocolate per pound body weight can cause problems. Even small amounts can cause pancreatic problems.
    7. Many common household items have been shown to be lethal in certain species. Miscellaneous items that are highly toxic even in low quantities include pennies (high concentration of zinc), mothballs (contain naphthalene or paradichlorobenzene. one or two balls can be life threatening in most species), potpourri oils, fabric softener sheets, automatic dish detergents (contain cationic detergents which could cause corrosive lesions), batteries (contain acids or alkali which can also cause corrosive lesions), homemade play dough (contains high quantity of salt), winter heat source agents like hand or foot warmers (contain high levels of iron), cigarettes, coffee grounds, and alcoholic drinks.
    8. All automotive products such as oil, gasoline, and antifreeze, should be stored in areas away from pet access. As little as one teaspoon of antifreeze (ethylene glycol) can be deadly in a seven-pound cat and less than one tablespoon could be lethal to a 20-pound dog.
    9. Before buying or using flea products on your pet or in your household, contact your veterinarian to discuss what types of flea products are recommended for your pet. Read ALL information before using a product on your animals or in your home. Always follow label instructions. When a product is labeled "for use in dogs only" this means that the product should NEVER be applied to cats. Also, when using a fogger or a house spray, make sure to remove all pets from the area for the time period specified on the container. If you are uncertain about the usage of any product, contact the manufacturer or your veterinarian to clarify the directions BEFORE use of the product.
    10. When treating your lawn or garden with fertilizers, herbicides, or insecticides, always keep your animals away from the area until the area dries completely. Discuss usage of products with the manufacturer of the products to be used. Always store such products in an area that will ensure no possible pet exposure.

    These helpful tips were compiled by: Jill A. Richardson, DVM. Veterinary Poison Information Specialist ASPCA National Animal Poison Control Center 1717 Philo Road, Suite #36 Urbana, IL 61801 (217) 337-5030
     
  5. GoldenMom

    GoldenMom Well-Known Member

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    What To Do For A Poisoned Animal

    Be Prepared for a Poison Emergency: Your animal may become poisoned in spite of your best efforts to secure your home. Because of this, we urge you to be prepared. Your animal companion should regularly be seen by a local veterinarian to maintain overall health.

    Know your vet's procedures for emergency situations, especially ones that occur after usual business hours. Keep phone numbers for the veterinarian, the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, and a local emergency veterinary service in a convenient location.

    Poison Safety Kit: Keep a pet safety kit on hand for emergencies. Such a kit should contain:

    -A fresh bottle of hydrogen peroxide 3% (USP)
    -Can of soft dog or cat food, as appropriate.
    -Turkey baster, bulb syringe or large medical syringe.
    -Saline eye solution to flush out eye contaminants.
    -Artificial tear gel to lubricate eyes after flushing.
    -Mild grease-cutting dishwashing liquid for the animal after skin contamination.
    -Rubber gloves.
    -Forceps to remove stingers.
    -Muzzle. An excited animal may harm you.
    -Pet carrier.

    Call the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center: (888) 426-4435
    A $50 consultation fee may apply. When you call the center, be ready to provide:

    Your name, address and telephone number.
    Information concerning the exposure (the amount of agent, the time since exposure, etc.). For various reasons, it is important to know exactly what poison the animal was exposed to. Have the product container/packaging available for reference.
    The species, breed, age, sex, weight and number of animals involved.
    The symptoms your animal(s) is(are) experiencing
     
  6. james dilley

    james dilley Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I just glanced at the Lists, And I Never knew there were so many plants that would hurt the Pups or the Cats, Thank you for sharing, Is there A list of plants for Cage birds in A Aviery type setting.?? Just wondering.
     
  7. GoldenMom

    GoldenMom Well-Known Member

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    James-I don't know of any list for birds offhand, but if you find one let me know. I'd be glad to have it posted here.
     
  8. GoldenMom

    GoldenMom Well-Known Member

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    Bumping so we don't lose this when we get pruned.
     
  9. longshadowfarms

    longshadowfarms Well-Known Member

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    Sarah, did we have a discussion at one point about common human foods that are poisonous/dangerous for dogs??? I can't find it! Chocolate is pretty common knowledge but I just got something again about grapes and raisins and for some reason onions stick in my mind and avocado????? It seems like the discussion wasn't that long ago but... Hang on, I have an idea! Nope! Still couldn't find it. I remember talking about part of an avocado being poisonous but they also have foods with avocado so it probably wasn't the whole thing? Maybe it got pruned. Rot!
     
  10. GoldenMom

    GoldenMom Well-Known Member

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    Maybe it was back when we lost all those posts. We haven't pruned much yet on this board. My pruning capabilities aren't working right now and Ross has 2 other boards. I'll see if I can't come up with something like that to add onto this thread tomorrow.
     
  11. longshadowfarms

    longshadowfarms Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, Sarah! Here's a list I found on the web that includes all pets. I'm sure it is not inclusive and certainly not everything is poisonous to all pets but it was interesting. Thinking back, I suppose we've been lucky. One of our old dogs used to LOVE to pick grapes off the vine and the kids say that our current Pyr has done that too. He's up at the house now and can't get into the grapes. I suppose to be safe we'll keep him out of there or fence those off.

    Foods Potentially Poisonous to Pets


    The following foods may be dangerous to your pet:

    * Alcoholic beverages
    * Apple seeds
    * Apricot pits
    * Avocados—toxic to birds, mice, rabbits, horses, cattle, and dairy goats
    * Cherry pits
    * Candy (particularly chocolate, which is toxic to dogs, cats, and ferrets, and any
    candy containing the sweetener Xylitol)
    * Coffee (grounds, beans, chocolate covered espresso beans)
    * Grapes
    * Hops (used in home beer brewing)
    * Macadamia nuts
    * Moldy foods
    * Mushroom plants
    * Mustard seeds
    * Onions and onion powder
    * Peach pits
    * Potato leaves and stems (green parts)
    * Raisins
    * Rhubarb leaves
    * Salt
    * Tea (caffeine)
    * Tomato leaves and stems (green parts)
    * Walnuts
    * Yeast dough

    Sources: ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, The Toronto Humane Society, and St. John's
    Poison Resource Center
     
  12. GoldenMom

    GoldenMom Well-Known Member

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    Looks like you've got it covered LSF!
     
  13. lonelyfarmgirl

    lonelyfarmgirl Well-Known Member Supporter

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    morning glory seeds can cause hallucinations
     
  14. TrapperJimsWife

    TrapperJimsWife Well-Known Member

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    can rhubarb leaves go safely into compost?
     
  15. Willowynd

    Willowynd Well-Known Member

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    Hmmm I have 5 of the poisionous plants on the list all over my yard plus grapes planted on my exercise pen fence. Never had an issue with anyone being poisoned, but then again, other than eating an occassional grape, they do not mess with them. Puppies may, but my eyes never leave them when they are not contained and I certainly would not let them munch on my flowers or play in my flower beds. Now, I do wonder about grapes though as grape seed extract is used in some high end kibbles- maybe if they ate a whole bunch? Raisins I could understand- especially in small dogs as drying the grapes concentrates the component that is harmful. But I am wondering if grapes is akin to garlic, a little is beneficial, a lot if harmful.
     
  16. longshadowfarms

    longshadowfarms Well-Known Member

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    One of my Labs used to eat grapes off the vine all the time. I wonder too about how much would be needed to affect them.
     
  17. GoldenMom

    GoldenMom Well-Known Member

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    I sure hope so, I put mine there.
     
  18. GoldenMom

    GoldenMom Well-Known Member

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    I don't think the whole mechanism is understood. Some dogs eat a lot of grapes/raisins and are fine, others eat a few and have serious issues.
     
  19. TrapperJimsWife

    TrapperJimsWife Well-Known Member

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    Northern NY
    we just got a new puppy ...he is chewing everything that sprouts! thanks for this list!
     
  20. stockdogtta

    stockdogtta Well-Known Member

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